Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: Population and Mobility Patterns



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ABORIGINAL PEOPLES IN CANADA NEWFOUNDLAND – MIDDLE SCHOOL

Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: Population and

Mobility Patterns



Lesson Overview:


Students will use the 2001 Census Data to identify the aboriginal populations of Canada, their reasons for internal migration and compile the data in table and circle graph format. Generalizations will be made of how these migration patterns are affected by the pull factors of their diverse environments.

Grade Level:


Grades 6-8

Time Required:


Two 50-minute classes
Curriculum Connection (Province and course):

Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation Curriculum for Social Studies General Curriculum Outcomes
People, Places and Environment General Curriculum Outcome:

Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the interactions among people, places and the environment:


Grade 6 - Social Studies- Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Can be modified for other grades and province


GCO 10 - Increasing global interdependency and technological change affect sustainable living and cultural empathy

  • 10.1 Recognize that Canada’s population and its distribution will continue to change.

  • 10.4 Recognize that the future of Canada requires cooperation and understanding.


GCO 5 - People are organized into groups and have common and specific goals

  • 5.2 Recognize how selected formal groups contribute to community life in Canada.


GCO 8 - People in the past overcame challenges as they developed their society

  • 8.1 Analyze the factors that influenced aboriginal peoples, Europeans and others settled in Canada.

  • 8.3 Examine traditional features of selected aboriginal cultures in Canada.


Grade 6 -Math- Newfoundland and Labrador

GCOF: Students will solve problems involving the collection, display and analysis of data.

  • F4 use bar graphs, double graphs and stem-and-leaf plots to display data.

  • F5 use circle graphs to represent proportions.


Grade 7 - Foundation for the Atlantic Canada Technology Education Curriculum

SCO 1.05: Students will be expected to work effectively in a variety of communications media
SCO 1.06: Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding of how communications technologies are used to build new knowledge from existing information
SCO 1.07: Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding of how communications technologies are used to create, modify and disseminate information

Link to Canadian National Geography Standards:


Essential Element #2: Places and Regions

  • How culture affects places and regions


Essential Element #4: Human Systems

  • Population density, distribution and growth patterns

  • Patterns of culture in Canada and the World

  • Human migration patterns (forced/voluntary)

  • Types and patterns of human settlement


Essential Element #5: Environment and Society

  • Limits and opportunities of the physical environment for human activities


Geographic Skill #2: Acquiring Geographic Information

  • Use a variety of research skills to locate and collect geographic data


Geographic Skill #3: Organizing Geographic Information

  • Prepare various forms of diagrams, tables and charts to organize and display geographic information.


Geographic Skills #4: Analyzing Geographic Information

  • Use statistics and other quantitative techniques to evaluate geographic information

  • Interpret and synthesize information obtained from a variety of sources - graphs, charts, tables, diagrams, texts, photographs, documents, and interviews.


Geographic Skill #5: Answering Geographic Questions

  • Make generalisations and assess their validity.


Link to Statistics Canada data source:

www.statcan.ca

Click on English

Click on Community Profiles

Click on 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey Community Profiles


Additional Resources, Materials and Equipment Required:

  • Computers with Internet access

  • Student activity sheets (attached)

  • Overhead and transparency of map showing where Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples reside: (www.atlas.gc.ca/site/english/maps/peopleandsociety/population/aboriginalpopulation/abo_2001 )

  • Computer linked to LCD projector


Main Objective:

Students will research the population of Canada’s Aboriginal groups, their rates of mobility along with reasons for this internal migration. Students will chart their findings in tables and graphs.



Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:



  • Use technology to identify characteristics of a cultural group.

  • Display geographic information in a chart.

  • Interpret a chart of geographic information to answer questions.

  • Analyze chart data to represent findings in a circle graph.

  • Form conclusions about how the migration trends of aboriginal people are influenced by the diverse challenges of their environments.

  • Recognize that Canada’s aboriginal populations will continue to be migratory.



The Lesson:








Teacher Activity

Student Activity

Introduction

Open the lesson by asking the students to orally define the terms aboriginal, Inuit, Métis and Indian. Discuss where these groups reside throughout Canada.



Students answer using prior knowledge or refer to class notes and the map of Canada’s Aboriginal population.





Lesson Development

Distribute the student activity sheets on the “Mobility of Aboriginal Populations”.


Use a computer and LCD projector to demonstrate how to access Census 2001 data - “The 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey Community Profiles” ( www.statcan.ca )
or
Display on the overhead the website (www.statcan.ca ) and the steps to access “The 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey Community Profiles
Ask students to complete the table on the activity sheets using the profile.
Record the data supplied by students’ research on a blank activity sheet on the LCD projector OR record research on a blank activity sheet on the overhead.


Students will logon to the StatCan website, and follow teacher direction to read the census data.
Students will use information contained within the census to complete the activity.
Students will supply data from their tables to complete class chart.

Conclusion

Have students supply answers to questions based on their findings such as :



  • Can you see any regional similarities of pull factors resulting in mobility?

  • How do the provinces differ in aboriginal groups?

  • What do you notice about regional differences in population?

  • Do you think the geographical location of the communities affects the increase or decrease of aboriginal populations?

  • Do you think the geographical location of the communities increases the pull factors of migration for aboriginal groups?

Distribute Activity Sheet 2 to students to plot “Reasons for Mobility” of two communities researched in the census.

Together students will discuss the answers using prior knowledge and the information contained in the class chart and map.


Students will select two communities from tables on Activity Sheet 1 and complete circle graphs. If needed students can refer to Math book pages 178-85.




Lesson Extension:

As a follow-up activity, have the students conduct a survey of individual classes within the school to discover the aboriginal population of each class, and their migration patterns. The results could be compiled into a bar graph for analysis of influencing factors. As a follow-up activity, have the students complete sections of the 2006 Census Teacher’s Kit (http://www22.statcan.ca/ccr06/ccr06_000_e.htm), and analyze the pull factors of the class.


Assessment of Student Learning:

  • Student activity sheets could be graded for accuracy of data recorded.

  • Administer a quiz on information contained within tables and charts.




Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: Population and Mobility Patterns

Student Activity 1







Vancouver BC


Whitehorse YK


Yellowknife NT


Iqaluit NU


P

o

p

u

l

a

t

I

o

n


Total Population










Total Aboriginal Population










North American Indian










Métis










Inuit










M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


% of Adults who always lived in the same community










% of Adults who did not move in the past 5 years










% of Adults who have moved in the past 5 years













R

e

a

s

o

n

s

F

o

r
M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


Family (%)










Work (%)










School (%)










Better Housing (%)










Availability of Services (%)

















Happy Valley- Goose Bay NL


Lennox Island, PE


Eskasoni , NS


P

o

p

u

l

a

t

I

o

n


Total Population








Total Aboriginal Population








North American Indian








Métis








Inuit








M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


% of Adults who always lived in the same community








% of Adults who did not move in the past 5 years








% of Adults who have moved in the past 5 years








R

e

a

s

o

n

s

F

o

r
M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


Family (%)








Work (%)








School (%)








Better Housing (%)








Availability of Services (%)














Burnt Church, NB


Montreal, QC


Ottawa - Gatineau ON


P

o

p

u

l

a

t

I

o

n


Total Population








Total Aboriginal Population








North American Indian








Métis








Inuit








M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


% of Adults who always lived in the same community








% of Adults who did not move in the past 5 years








% of Adults who have moved in the past 5 years








Mobi

l

i

ty


Family (%)








Work (%)








School (%)








Better Housing (%)








Availability of Services (%)
















Winnipeg, MB


Regina, SK


Edmonton, AB


P

o

p

u

l

a

t

I

o

n


Total Population








Total Aboriginal Population








North American Indian








Métis








Inuit








M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


% of Adults who lived in same community








% of Adults who did not move in the past 5 years








% of Adults who have moved in the past 5 years








R

e

a

s

o

n

s

F

o

r
M

o

b

I

l

I

t

y


Family (%)








Work (%)








School (%)








Better Housing (%)








Availability of Services (%)










Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: Population and Mobility Patterns

Student Activity 2
Aboriginal Populations: Reasons for Mobility
1.



2.

Canadian Council for Geographic Education (www.ccge.org)

Statistics Canada (www.statcan.ca)


Directory: resources -> learning centre -> lesson plans docs -> migration
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