Australian Customs and Border Protection Service Agency resources and planned performance



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Australian Customs and Border Protection Service
Agency resources and planned performance



Australian Customs and Border Protection Servic

Section 1: Agency Overview and Resources 89

1.1Strategic Direction Statement 89

1.2 Agency Resource Statement 91

1.3 Budget Measures 93



Section 2: Outcomes and Planned Performance 95

2.1 Outcomes and Performance Information 95



Section 3: Explanatory Tables and Budgeted Financial Statements 117

3.1 Explanatory Tables 117

3.2 Budgeted Financial Statements 120

3.2 Budgeted Financial Statements Tables 122



Section 1: Agency Overview and Resources 89

1.1 Strategic Direction Statement 89

1.2 Agency Resource Statement 89

1.3 Budget Measures 93



Section 2: Outcomes and Planned Performance 95

2.1 Outcomes and Performance Information 95



Section 3: Explanatory Tables and Budgeted Financial Statements 117

3.1 Explanatory Tables 117

3.2 Budgeted Financial Statements 120

Australian Customs and Border Protection Service

Section 1: Agency Overview and Resources

    1. Strategic Direction Statement


How borders are managed can foster or impede lawful trade and travel. Border control points, systems and processes sit astride supply chains and travel pathways for both licit and illicit trade and travel.

The very design of these points, systems and processes can add to economic competitiveness and productivity, by fostering rapid movement and border entry or exit. Alternatively, they can detract from competitiveness and productivity by impeding entry and exit for legitimate traders and travellers thereby diminishing the efficiency of our national infrastructure. Managed poorly they can increase national security risk and lessen community safety.

The Australian border is a national asset, possessing both economic and strategic value. The border is a complex continuum, stretching onshore and offshore.

The Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS or the Service) is responsible for protecting the safety, security and commercial interests of Australians by delivering effective border protection.

The increasing integration of the Australian economy into the global economy continues to place pressure on facilitation and intervention at the border. The illicit economy is driven towards globalisation by the same factors as the legitimate economy. Organised crime groups are growing and diversifying their interests as access to illicit markets expands and opportunities to disguise illicit movements increase. The increasing volume and complexity of international trade and travel can mask attempts to circumvent the rules of legitimate trade and travel and avoid revenue obligations.

The Service’s core functions are to target and prevent criminality whilst fostering legitimate travel and trade and collecting border revenue and trade statistics.

The Service’s capabilities have been challenged by the pace of these changes in the global environment.

The Government has decided that from 1 July 2015 the Australian Border Force will come into existence as a single operational frontline border protection agency undertaking a range of operations and tasks including daily border control operations; investigations, compliance and enforcement activities; and immigration detention and removal tasks. This will create a single investigations, compliance and enforcement capability that will deal with immigration and customs infringements. The Australian Border Force will be positioned within the Department of Immigration and Border Protection performing the corporate, regulatory and policy functions.

In 2014-15 ACBPS will begin work to deliver reforms towards a more flexible and mobile resource deployment model. ACBPS will create the vocational streams of the future Australian Border Force, upgrade critical intelligence and analytical capabilities and improve enforcement capabilities. This will ensure that interventions at the border are intelligence-led and the future Australian Border Force can become a disciplined, uniformed and when required, armed front-line service.

In 2014-15 the Service will meet the current and emerging challenges at the border through:



  • establishing a Strategic Border Command to institute formal command and control of the border and improve the supporting capability to ensure systematic, informed and deliberate deployment of effort against risk

  • establishing the National Border Targeting Centre to enable the participating agencies to use shared systems and information to provide a nationally coordinated approach to managing the risk posed by travellers and goods and inform better operational responses

  • enhancing intelligence systems and analytical capability required to support better intelligence threat and risk assessments and the needs of the NBTC and partners

  • designing a stable, scalable traveller processing platform capable of supporting next generation gates

  • designing a Trusted Trader programme to foster legitimate trade

  • enhancing technology systems including improvements to computing power to process massive data holdings

  • increasing remote area patrols and procuring three vessels

  • establishing a College to deliver the professional, technical and operational training Border Force officers will need to work effectively within the future border environment.

To implement these initiatives will require finalisation of workforce planning which commenced in 2013-14. This will see a slight drop of approximately 80 ASL over
2014-15 which reflects 2013-14 Machinery of Government changes resulting in the transfer of the Anti-Dumping Commission to the Department of Industry as well as aligning officers’ skills to deliver the future Australian Border Force.

In addition, the ACBPS has been provided funding of $3.7 million in 2014-15 only for the Combating people smuggling –international engagement measure. This measure provides for the continuation of effort in engagement and capacity building activity in the short to medium term to sustain the drop in Illegal Maritime Arrivals. The funding will also provide for locally engaged staff to assist with the ongoing engagement effort which remains crucial to permanently breaking people smuggling business models.

From 2014-15 the government will provide $480.5 million over four years
($711.9 million over six years, including $438.7 million in capital funding). The cost of this measure will be met from within the existing resources of both the Service and the Department of Immigration and Border Protection and improved revenue collection of $208.2 million over four years ($346.6 million over six years) through the use of analytics and detailed data modelling, new processes for revenue collection and a targeted campaign to improve compliance. 


1.2 Agency Resource Statement


Table 1.1 shows the total resources from all sources. The table summarises how resources will be applied by outcome and by administered and departmental classification.

Table 1.1: ACBPS Resource Statement — Budget Estimates for


2014‑15 as at Budget May 2014


Table 1.1: ACBPS Resource Statement — Budget Estimates for
2014‑15 as at Budget May 2014 (continued)



  1. Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2014-15.

  2. Estimated adjusted balance carried forward from previous year.

  3. Includes an amount of $32.6 million in 2014-15 for the Departmental Capital Budget (refer to table 3.2.5 for further details). For accounting purposes this amount has been designated as 'contributions by owners'.

  4. s31 Relevant Agency receipts — estimate.

  5. Appropriation Bill (No.2) 2014-15.

  6. At 30 June 2013 the balance in Special Accounts was transferred to Administered Revenue. There have been no transactions in the Special Accounts in 2013-14. It is anticipated that Special Accounts will be revoked as at 30 June 2014. For further details on special accounts see Table 3.1.2.

All figures are GST exclusive.

1.3 Budget Measures


Budget measures in Part 1 relating to the ACBPS are detailed in Budget Paper No. 2 and are summarised below.

Table 1.2: ACBPS 2014‑15 Budget measures


Part 1: Measures announced since the 2013‑14 MYEFO

Part 1: Measures announced since the 2013‑14 MYEFO (continued)

Prepared on a Government Financial Statistics (fiscal) basis


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