Changes in light fraction soil organic matter and in organic carbon and nitrogen in compost amended soils



Download 69.84 Kb.
Date02.02.2018
Size69.84 Kb.

16th IFOAM Organic World Congress, Modena, Italy, June 16-20, 2008
Archived at http://orgprints.org/11791

Changes in light fraction soil organic matter and in organic carbon and nitrogen in compost amended soils

Owen, J.1 Lynch, D.2 & Fillmore, S.A.E.3

Key words: snap beans, soil organic matter, nitrogen, carbon, compost

Abstract

Organic vegetable growers can use compost to supply crops with nutrients and increase soil organic matter (OM), but little information is available about the transformations of compost OM over time in organically managed systems. This study examined light fraction soil organic matter (LFSOM) and organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in organically and conventionally managed snap bean cropping systems (continuous beans (CB) and a fully phased beans/fall rye rotation (BR)) following three years of fertility treatments (1x and 3x compost, and 1x synthetic fertiliser, where 1x provided 50 kg ha-1 N). Light fraction C and N increased with compost amendment, with the C:N ratio significantly lower in composted plots than in synthetically fertilised plots. Rotation and weeding method played no role in the composition of LFSOM, or the percentage of LFSOM making up whole soil organic C or N. Light fraction N and C roughly doubled in the 1x compost plots over the three years, compared with synthetically fertilised plots, but was only 2.5 times higher in 3x compost plots. While the addition of 13 t ha-1 C increased whole soil C by 5.6 Mg ha-1, tripling the amount of added C raised whole soil C by 9.9 Mg ha-1. 1x and 3x compost increased whole soil N by 20 and 33%, respectively, compared with the 1x synthetically fertilised plots. The 3x compost treatment only, by reducing bulk density, improved soil physical properties.

Introduction

Soil organic matter has many important functions in promoting crop growth, including provision of nutrients, retention of water, connecting pore spaces and supporting plant-growth promoting organisms (Weil and Magdoff, 2004). When fertilising organic crops with compost, large quantities of organic matter are added to the soil influencing physical properties such as bulk density (Lynch et al., 2005), as well as pools of organic carbon. One densiometric fraction, the light fraction soil organic matter (LFSOM), represents a pool of organic matter intermediate to labile pools of fresh crop residues and recalcitrant pools of humic materials. LFSOM is considered a useful early indicator of changes in SOM due to management practice (Gregorich and Ellert, 1993), and has been used to describe the fate of compost amendments to soil (Lynch et al., 2005; Carter et al., 2004; Grandy et al., 2002). Fertility treatments affect the proportion of LFSOM in the soil, as well as its constituent proportions of carbon and nitrogen (Lynch et al., 2005; Grandy et al., 2002). Other cropping practices may affect LFSOM, including crop rotation (Grandy et al., 2002) and, over the long term, tillage (Murage et al., 2007). This study aimed at determining the effects of three years of fertility regime (synthetic fertiliser vs. compost rates), crop rotation, and weeding tillage on LFSOM and LF C and N.



Materials and methods

A long term organic rotations experiment was established in 2002. The layout consisted of three replicates at two sites, each comprising three strips, to which each was assigned a rotational sequence of continuous beans (CB), or one of the phases of a beans/fall rye two-year rotation (BR). Strips were divided into six plots. To each was assigned a treatment combination (Table 1) of fertiliser and weeding method. Compost had a mean C:N ratio of 19.8, with total nitrogen on a dry matter basis of 1.2%. The 1x compost rate delivered the equivalent of 50 kg N ha-1: the same rate of N applied in synthetically fertilised plots. In herbicide-treated plots, herbicide applications followed commercial practices. Mechanical weeding was carried out twice per season. Treatments are summarized in Table 1. Bulk density cores and soil (0-15 cm depth) samples for organic matter analysis were taken after the completion of the crop rotation cycle, early in 2006. Total soil organic matter was separated into heavy and light fractions using a sodium iodide solution with a density of 1.7 g cm-1 in the manner described by Gregorich and Ellert (1993) and carbon and nitrogen were measured using dry combustion in a LECO CNS analyser. Analysis of variance was used to assess effects of rotation and fertility treatments, and calculations estimated the amount of applied compost C and N, and remaining whole soil C and N.



Tab. 1: Summary of treatments applied in the first rotation cycle (2003- 2005)

Treatment

Source of nutrients

Yearly N-P-K on Beans (kg/ha)

Yearly N-P-K on Rye (kg/ha)

Weeding method

F1x -M

Fertiliser

50-68-82

100-15-60

Mechanical

F1x-H

Fertiliser

50-68-82

100-15-60

Herbicide

C1x-M

Compost

50-28-26

50-28-26

Mechanical

C1x-H

Compost

50-28-26

50-28-26

Herbicide

C3x-M

Compost

150-84-78

150-84-78

Mechanical

C3x-H

Compost

150-84-78

150-84-78

Herbicide

Note: P and K rates are averages for the three years. For fertiliser, rates varied according to soil test. For compost, rates varied according to compost composition.

Results

Compost amendment affected the C and N content, and the C:N ratio of the LFSOM compared with synthetic fertiliser amendment (Table 2). In addition LF C and LF N as percentages of TOC increased with compost amendment (Table 3). Only the 3x rate of compost reduced soil bulk density. Weeding treatment and crop rotation did not significantly affect any of the parameters, though a significant rotation x weeding interaction existed for whole soil C:N showing it higher in mechanically weeded CB plots than in herbicide treated CB plots. In BR, weeding method did not affect whole soil C:N.



Tab. 2: Mean light fraction (LF) carbon (C), nitrogen (N) content and C:N in soil (0-15 cm) from different fertility treatments applied from 2003-2005.

Treatment

LF %C

LF %N

LF C:N

F1x

27.40

1.33

20.42

C1x

29.76

1.58

18.82

C3x

31.40

1.70

18.48

Standard error of mean

0.026

0.019

0.304













Significance










Fertility application

***

***

***

Fertiliser vs. Compost

***

***

***

Rotation

ns

ns

ns

Weeding

ns

ns

ns

ns non-significant, *** significant for P<0.001

Tab. 3: Mean light fraction (LF) carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) expressed as percentatges of whole soil (0-15 cm) organic (O) C and N, and bulk density in fertility treatments over 2003-2005.

Treatment

LF-C as % of whole soil OC

LF-N as % of whole soil ON

Bulk density (g (cm3)-1)

F1x

7.40

6.33

1.30

C1x

13.47

11.86

1.30

C3x

18.86

16.71

1.24

Standard error of mean

0.070

0.076

0.015













Significance










Fertility application

***

***

**

Fertiliser vs. Compost

***

***

~

Rotation

ns

ns

ns

Weeding

ns

ns

ns

ns non-significant, ~ significant for P<0.1 *significant for P<0.05, **significant for P<0.01, *** significant for P<0.001

Tab. 4: Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) applied over three years, and changes to mass of whole soil C and N measured in 2006.

Treatment

Total C applied

(Mg ha-1)

Total N applied

(kg ha-1)

Whole soil C (Mg ha-1)

Whole soil N (kg ha-1)

F1x

0

150

31.6

1950

C1x

13

150

37.2

2340

C3x

39

450

41.5

2604

Discussion

Gains in LFSOM, C and N are expected when amending soils with composts, which are composed of organic matter in varying stages of transformation from labile fresh material toward humic materials. In this study, gains in LFSOM, C and N were not proportionate to compost application rate. This runs contrary to the results of another study which examined corn silage compost at two rates, one double the other, and found that soil C concentrations and total soil C both increased proportionately with compost rate, compared with a non-compost amended control (Lynch et al., 2005). Compost did not transform into more resistant heavy fraction soil organic matter (HFSOM) more quickly in the 3x compost rate than in the 1x compost rate, since HFSOM data showed equal increases in HF C and HF N between synthetic fertiliser and 1x compost as between 1x and 3x compost (data not shown). Other interactions are likely at work, which may be revealed with further study of crop residues returned to the soil during the period of study, crop products exported. Study of plant nutrient data may give insight into the mineralization of organic matter in the different treatments.



Conclusions

Compost application increased whole soil C and N, LFSOM, LF C, LF N, and the LF C:N ratio. Weeding method and crop rotation did not affect these parameters, except in the CB rotation, where mechanical weeding resulted in a higher C:N ratio than did herbicide. Compost amendment at the 3x rate decreased bulk density compared with both 1x compost and synthetic fertiliser. Though the SOM parameters increased with compost application, the increase was not a linear relationship with rate. This may interest growers whose cost of compost (fixed $ per ton) increases linearly with rate.



Acknowledgments

This work was supported by AAFC’s Matching Investment Initiative, Cardwell Farms Compost Products, Western Ag Innovations, La Ferme Michaud and Beatrice Allain.



References

Carter, M.R., Sanderson, J.B., and MacLeod, J.A. (2004) Influence of compost on the physical properties and organic matter fractions of a fine sandy loam throughout the cycle of a potato rotation. Can J. Soil Sci. 84:211-218.

Grandy, A.S., Porter, G.A., and Erich, M.S. (2002) Organic amendment and rotation crop effects on the recovery of soil organic matter and aggregation in potato cropping systems. Soil Sci. Am. J. 66:1311-1319.

Gregorich, E.G. and Ellert, B.H. (1993) Light fraction and macro organic matter in mineral soils. In: Carter, M.R. (ed.) Soil Sampling and Methods of Analysis. CRC Press, Boca Raton, p. 397-407.

Lynch, D.H., Voroney, R.P., and Warman, P.R. (2005) Soil physical properties and organic matter fractions under forages receiving composts, manure or fertilizer. Compost Sci. & Utilization 13:252-261.

Murage, E.W., Voroney, P.R., Kay, B.D., Deen, B. and Beyaert, R. (2007) Dynamics of turnover of soil organic matter as affected by tillage. Soil Sci. Am. J. 4:1363-1370.



Weill, R. and Magdoff, F. (2004): Significance of soil organic matter to soil quality and health. In: Magdoff, F and Weill, R. (eds.): Soil Organic Matter in Sustainable Agriculture. CRC Press, Boca Raton, p. 1-43.

1 Senator Hervé J. Michaud Research Farm, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1045 St. Joseph Road, Bouctouche, New Brunswick, Canada E4S 2J2, E-Mail: OwenJ@agr.gc.ca Internet http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC

2 Organic Agriculture Centre of Canada, Nova Scotia Agricultural College, P.O. Box 550, Truro, Nova Scotia, B2N 5E3, Email: DLynch@nsac.ca Internet http://nsac.ca/pas/staff/dlynch/default.asp

3 Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 32 Main Street, Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada, B4N 1J5 E-mail: FillmoreS@agr.gc.ca Internet www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC



Download 69.84 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page