District profile Haripur Introduction



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Sub Total-Ghazi

28,182

14,596

13,586

2. Qazi Pur

Qazi Pur*

3,391

1,706

1,684

Aldo Jabbi

2,455

1,264

1,191

Hassanpur

2,223

1,086

1,137

Jammu

1,304

645

659

Mian Dheri*

3,784

1,859

1,925

Chak Mirpur

172

98

74

Mirpur Ghari

129

62

67

Naqarchian

1,610

805

805

Sheikh Choor

1,353

645

707

Sub Total-Qazi Pur

16,421

8,171

8,250

3. Nara Amazai

Kali Lar*

1,893

961

932

Charoona

1,447

741

706

Charwai

2,032

1,033

999

Nara*

827

445

382

Bringwal

219

105

114

Bela

1,310

663

647

Dheryan

295

152

142

Kupla

778

408

370

Shah Muhammad Ghari

773

413

360

Shingrrri

2,072

1,009

1,063

Parba*

3,400

1,735

1,665

Degra

1,080

571

509

Kuprri*

5,260

2,600

2,660

Sub Total-Nara Amazai

21,386

10,838

10,548

4. Sirikot

Sirikot*

16,785

7,677

9,108

Gojra*

1,897

895

1,002

Bail

1,964

941

1,023

Garhan

2,221

1,048

1,174

Sub Total-Sirikot

22,867

10,561

12,306

5. Kundi Umer Khana

Salam Khand*

3,305

1,484

1,820

Kundi

7,151

3,435

3,716

Umar Khana

1,903

903

1,000

Mohat*

1,351

687

665

Dall

9,721

5,223

4,498

Sub Total-Kundi Umar Khana

23,431

11,732

11,699

6. Kotehrra

Kotehrra*

4,914

2,467

2,446

Amgah

1,295

639

656

Darchitti

1,616

823

793

Tahlikot

2,093

1,104

989

Bagh Dara

1,187

617

570

Badros*

4,866

2,374

2,492

Dhoke

586

308

278

Jabbar

497

269

228

Kala Katha

515

262

253

Khoi Dara

1,249

663

586

Padarra

703

377

326

Khairbarra*

1,957

980

977

Bandi

1,197

614

583

Chamiari

2,164

1,082

1,082

Garra

3,960

1,940

2,020

Pipliala

6,368

3,164

3,204

Sub Total-Kotehrra

35,168

17,685

17,483

7. Baitgali

Baitgali*

2,671

1,274

1,397

Amb

466

210

256

Kaneer

1,803

821

981

Ashra*

827

394

434

Cahkli

1,709

807

903

Choora

1,887

928

959

Devi

2,845

1,442

1,403

Gali

3,574

1,838

1,736

Keya*

709

357

352

Khabal*

1,242

678

564

Sithana*

480

234

246

Barag

1,054

561

493

Laqab

591

296

295

Sub Total-Baitgali

19,857

9,839

10,018

Total Tehsil Ghazi

167,313

83,422

83,891

Grand Total-District Haripur

1,024,497

511,439

513,058

*Patwar Circle Source: Census 1998.
Socio-Ethnic Features


Total Households

Approx: 146,357

Average HH Size

Approx: 7 Persons

Male & Female Ratio

49.92 : 50.08 %

Population Density

2.22 Persons/Acre

(550.26 Persons/sq km)

Rural & Urban Ratio

88% : 12%

Literacy Rate

Approx: 65%


The area is inhabited by the present tribes since early 14th century. They mostly came from central Asia and Afghanistan. The different territories of the district remained parts of different reigns by Turkish, Durani, Sikh, Ghakar, Pashtun and British dynasties. Major tribes / casts in the districts are Tareen, Dilazak, Tahirkheli, Gujar, Awan, Mishwani, Pathan, Ghakar, Jadoon, Syed, Tanooli and Turks. Tareen live in some villages in the plain areas of the district i.e. Darwesh, Rehana and Pandak. They are ethnically Sarabani pathan and have a long history of resistance to both the Sikhs and the British. They came to Haripur on the invitation of the Gujars whom they gradually replaced.
Exiled by Mughal emperor Babar from Afghanistan, they came to Peshawar valley and then extended to other parts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa including Haripur. They inhabit some villages in the plain i.e. Sarai Salah, Ail Khan and Shah Muhammad etc. The Tahirkheli / Tarkheli is a sub cast of Utmanzai Pashtun and occupy the extreme south western part of the district along the district near to Attock. They have more population in Ghazi.
Gujar is one of the oldest inhabitant tribe of the district. They form a major portion of the total population of Haripur. They live sparsely in the whole district but concentrate in the villages i.e. Kot Najeebullah, Mang, Chamba Pind and villages surrounding Khanpur. Awan is another big tribe, next to Gujar, in the district. It is the most prominent cast of the region and lives in almost all areas of the district, while they have concentrated population in Sikankarpur, Changi Bandi, and other villages situated along side river Daur. Notable sub clans are Kutab Shais, Khokhars and Chuhans. Mishwani is considered as a Pashtun tribe and mostly dwell in western villages of the district i.e. Kundi, Umar Khana, Siri Kot, Dasso Mera and Bakka etc.
Ghakars are the descendants of Sultan Said Khan, who founded Khanpur in the late 16th century. They always supported the different ruling dynasties and secured a favor from them. In the near past they owned most of the Khanpur villages and lands. At the moment they have a prominent role in politics of the district and have a great say in the area. Jadoon is originally a Pathan tribe that migrated from Gadoon Swabi centuries ago and lives mostly in Bagra, Kholian and Kailag villages.
Syeds are further divided in sub sects of Bukhari, Tarmizi, Mashadi and Gillani. They are scattered throughout the district. Tanoli is the third tribe of the district and have two sub sections of Hidwal and Pallal. Basnished from across the Indus by Yusafzai the tribe settled in the Haripur and at the moment live in upper and lower Tanawal. Turks are the descendants of the past Turk rulers of the area. They ruled the area in 15th -17th centuries but gradually supplanted by Pathan and Ghakar tribes. Now they have a small population and mostly live in Mankarai, Nartopa and Pharhari villages.
Besides these native tribes, about 1% population has migrated to the district from other districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa or other provinces, while a considerable population (about 100,000 persons) of Afghan refugees is residing in the district for last three and half decade. There are three refugees’ camps i.e. Panian.1, Panian.2 and Padana while some people live outside the camps. Although, they are living amicably with the host communities, still they have an impact on the business and labor opportunities in the district.
Most of the people are Muslims, though belonging to different schools of thoughts i.e. Suni (Deubandi and Barilwi) and Shia. Only 0.1% of the total population is Christian, 0.1% is Ahmadi/Qadyani, and 0.2% population belongs to other religions. According to the 1998 District Census Report, Hindko is the predominant language in the district, representing 68% of population, followed by Pashto (28.9%), Punjabi (1.8%), Urdu (0.5%) and Gujri (0.8) is also spoken is some parts of the district. There is a great trend of modern and religious education. Literacy rate in the urban areas is more than 70% while that in rural areas is up to 50% but it is increasing year by year.

(Source: Census 1998 & Primary data from the communities)



Abodes

Most of the population lives in villages. About 88% of the total population dwells in rural areas while 12% have their abode in towns and /or Haripur City. In rural areas, 89.21% HHs live in their own houses, 4.89% lives in rented and 5.90% live in free of rent houses / or on tenancy. In urban localities 69.75 % houses are owned by the dwellers, 25.59 are rented and 4.65 are free of rent. About 82% houses are pacca, 4% houses are semi pacca and 14% houses are dirt in rural areas, while in urban areas 92% houses are pacca, 2% houses are semi pacca and 6% houses are dirt. More than 95% houses have electricity and about 75% houses have drinking water supply.

(Source: Census 1998 & Primary data from the communities)
Food and dress

Usually bread of cereal i.e. wheat and maize is used with pulses, meat/beef, vegetables and dairy products. Rice is also a favorite dish in the district. Break fasts usually consists of bread, tea and some kind of Tarkari. Common people in the district wear traditional dress of Shalwar, Qamiz and blanket/chadar as per season, while chapple and shoes are the mostly used foot wear. Educated and well up people are more inclined toward to western dress. Women also use different kind ornaments.

(Source: Census 1998 & Primary data from the communities)


Marriages

Marriages are mostly arranged ones. Ceremonies are held at engagements and weddings. Usually a girl is engaged after getting 15 year old while a boy is engaged at 25 and more. Although huge expenses on weddings and dowry still exist there is a declining trend in other customs like wedding procession called Janj carrying the bride in a palanquin or Doli and other celebrations. (Source: Census 1998 & Primary data from the communities)


Funerals

People (men and women) participate with one another during deaths. After funeral / burial rites, alms are distributed among the poor. Friends and relatives of the bereaved family serve guests with food as no cooking is done at deceased’s house. Condolence continues for three consecutive days at the mosque or the nearest Hujra. (Source: Census 1998 & Primary data from the communities)
Social Institutions

There are always muhallah or hamlet based mosques also used for community meetings regarding issues of common interest. Although some well up people have big Hujras but not communal. Most of the people have their private guest rooms and the aforesaid Hujras are used on very special occasions by the common people. There is either a political based or tribal based leadership in the district and there is no regular Jirga system but need based. In the district, a good social capital exist in form of civil society organizations i.e. NGOs, Cos, WOs, VOs, LSOs, art & literary societies and sports clubs etc. Some religious Madaris and organizations are providing platforms to different religious sects/schools of thoughts (Source: Primary data from the communities)


Climate


Month Wise Mean Temperature, Precipitation and Relative Humidity, District Haripur

Month

Mean Temperature oC

Precipitation (millimeters)

Relative Humidity (%)

Maximum

Minimum

January

12.6

1.8

64.8

59.1

February

13.4

2.9

113.6

61.0

March

17.8

6.9

142.3

57.0

April

23.3

11.4

111.8

51.4

May

28.2

15.5

81.6

42.0

June

32.4

19.7

85.3

41.2

July

29.6

20.1

258.3

66.7

August

28.2

19.3

261.3

47.7

September

27.8

16.8

96.9

62.3

October

24.9

12.0

56.9

51.3

November

20.1

7.2

31.9

49.4

December

15.0

3.4

61.5

55.9

Annual

22.8

11.4

1,366.2

56.0


(Source: Census 1998)
Climate of the district is hot in summer and cold in winter. Spring and autumn are the transitional seasons between summer and winter. December –February are the coldest months and the temperature falls down to 30 C – 10 C. A gradual increase in the temperature starts from the month of March and it remains moderate till April. From May onward it gets hotter day by day and goes up to a climax of 350 C – 400 C in June. It remains hot till September and decline of the mercury starts from October onward. October-November have moderate temperature with a gradual downward trend.
February-April (spring) and July-August (monsoon) get more rains i.e. approximately 509.6 mm of the total annual rain of 1366.2 mm is received in the two months of July and August. High mountains of Muslim Abad UC in the east and Nara Amazai UC in the western north also get snow in January-December. The mean maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation and relative humidity of the district recorded at Kakul Metrological station is reflected in the table above.
A gradual change in the climate has been observed by the local communities in the past twenty –fifty years. The temperature and rainfall schedule is becoming erratic year by year, causing adverse impact on farming and other routines of the community e.g. due to severe drought, farmers are giving up crops which need more water and work load of women is increased in form of water fetching / collection. Erratic rains lead to floods in rain fed stream that cause damages to agriculture lands and other infrastructure while it also degrade range lands perpetually. (Source: Census 1998 & Primary data from the communities)

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