Gerund Phrases Learning Goal: Identify and Define effective syntax techniques Apply effective syntax techniques in complex writing tasks Part 1: Matching



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Gerund Phrases
Learning Goal: Identify and Define effective syntax techniques

Apply effective syntax techniques in complex writing tasks
Part 1: Matching

Match the gerund phrases with the sentences. Write out each sentence, inserting and underlining the gerund phrases.




Sentences:

Gerund Phrases:

1. Building the railroad involved ^.

Stephen E. Ambrose, Nothing Like it in the World



a. making notes in the margins of a book

2. God had not struck Westley dead for ^.

Langston Hughes, The Big Sea




b. getting easier to see through until all your failing insides are in plain view and everyone’s business

3. ^ is literally an expression of your differences, or agreements of opinion, with the author.

Mortimer Adler, “How to Mark a Book”



c. building a grade, laying ties laying rails, spiking in rails, filling in ballast

4. In the process of ^ we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds.

Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream”



d. gaining our rightful place

5. Getting old is just a matter of ^.

Barbara Kingsolver, Pigs in Heaven




e. taking His name in vain or for lying in the temple

Part 2: Unscramble to Imitate

In the model and the scrambled list, identify the gerunds. Next, unscramble and write out the sentence parts to imitate the model. Finally, write out your own imitation of the model and identify the gerunds.


MODEL: We had to pray without ceasing and work without tiring.

Maya Angelou, The Heart of a Woman


a. and

b. to study without tiring

c. we had

d. listen without daydreaming

YOU:


Part 3: Combining to Imitate

In the model, identify the gerund phrase. Next, combine the list of sentences to imitate the model. Finally, write your own imitation of the model and identify the gerund phrase.


MODEL: After making ten paper birds, Sadako lined them up on the table beside the golden crane.

Eleanor Coerr, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes


a. This happened before taking the nasty medicine.

b. Before he took it, James put it down.

c. He put in on the sink.

d. He put it down near the toothpaste tube.

YOU:

Part 4: Imitating

Identify the gerund phrases in the models and sample imitations. Then write an imitation of each model sentence, one sentence part at a time.


MODELS:
1. After untangling himself, he ran to the wall.

Mark Bowden, Black Hawk Down

Sample: For preparing herself, she listened to the music.
YOU:
2. He remembered seeing blood bursting through the man’s fingers in a flood, drenching his uniform.

Stephen King, Hearts in Atlantis

Sample: He anticipated hearing the applause filling up the entire theater in a wave, fulfilling his dream.
YOU:
3. Feeding our bellies seemed a more vital job to us than trying to feed our minds.

Christy Brown, My Left Foot


Sample: Sharing my mind was a more acceptable activity to me than attempting to share my heart


YOU:

Part 5: Expanding

The gerund phrases are omitted at the caret mark (^) in the following sentences. For each caret, add a gerund phrase, blending your content and style with the rest of the sentence.


1. Some parents, upon ^, had their hair turn white overnight, were stunned into catatonia, heart attacks, or sudden death.



Keith Donohue, The Stolen Child

2. I remember the bitter fifth-grade conflict I touched off by ^ and ^.

Jon Katz, “How Boys Become Men”

3. ^ and ^ were routine procedures, and Eliza lost her horror of blood and learned to stitch human flesh as calmly as formerly she had embroidered sheets for her trousseau.



Isabel Allende, Daughter of Fortune

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