Joshua Lamoreaux also listed as Josue Lamoureux and Josué Lamoureux


[All children of Daniel Lamoreaux married English.]



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[All children of Daniel Lamoreaux married English.]


Assimilation of the French refugee into the body politic of England [and the American Colonies] came about through the use of the English Language, by intermarriage, and a lack of desire to remain an isolated group.” Reaman, C. Elmore , The Trail of the Huguenots in Europe, the United States,

South Africa and Canada, p.10 & 83

1758 by June Putnam Co, NY Daniel Lamoreaux's son, John, appears in the Southern Precinct later Putnam Co.

"I believe John is the Lamoureux Referred to by Blake;" "Daniel's son, Isaac, the longest resident of Duchess (i.e. Putnam) County of the family. Isaac arrived in 1761.

"Current View of Daniel Lamoreaux"

David Kendall Martin, 2/1974, New York

“…I have gone over many of the Dutchess County tax rolls- all of them for the Lamoreaux areas of interest, and I am sure that no Lamoreaux is listed there before June 1758 when John appears in the Southern Precinct, …Joshua does not appear until June 1765 in the same precinct – but there is no assessment for 1764, so he could have moved into the area between June 1763 and June 1764; in the same precinct at that time are: (John?), James (my line), and Isaac.The latter three continue to be listed in the Southern Precinct: June 1766, June 1767, June 1768, June 1769. In June 1770, James and Jeshua are there but I can’t find Isaac. The same for June 1771. About this time tha Southern Precinct was broken up into several precincts and in 1772 we have James, Isaac, and Joshua in the Philipse Precinct; in 1773 we have Joshua in Philipse and James in Charlotte (which is now the area of Hyde Park where he remains unil the lists stop in 1779; Isaac is in Charlotte also until 1779; Joshua stays in Philipse Precinct in 1773, 1774 (so the fence viewer must be Joshua’s son and not my James as some have said), and 1775. There is no list for 1776, and I have not found Joshua in 1777, 1778, or 1779, but he might well be there but not taxed – the Revolution was in full swing at this point.” [Note added: “Joshua’s son was born 1762, only 6…” so it can’t be him.]



Notes of David K Martin, in a letter to Isabelle 1974

1758 July Duchess Co, NY James, Josué Lamoureux & Elizabeth Ogden's 1st child, is born in Duchess Co, NY

(later Putnam Co) Family Records

Philipstown, NY Archive Record [says B 1760 it has no Suzanna] .

James Lamoureux lived to be 111 years, 4 months. Died in Canada, 1869.

[Sets Birth date at July 1758.] [Did he set his birth place?]

Toronto Newspaper "...rol", on County News page

Brougham, 25 Oct 1938
Daniel Lamoreaux Children

"Of the second generation we have Daniel's [Lamoureux] nine children and the three children of his two sisters. This number is probably incomplete. We are certain of seven sons of the family name, one son named Chaperone, one son named Dusjean, two daughters of Lamoureux origin, and one daughter of the Chaperone origin.

"During Daniel's [Lamoureux] lifetime the family seems to have been kept well together, but after his death, perhaps influenced in some degree by the restlessness of the people just before the Revolution, his sons began to scatter. The Revolution introduced another disturbing element, sending two of his sons into exile. Only one of them remained near the old homestead, two went to Orange Co, and one (with two of Andrew's sons) to Albany Co. It was a period of comparative poverty, hard work, hard living, much ignorance, and large families. All of Daniel's sons, so far as I have records, had large families, the smallest 7 children, the largest 13. They were all typical pioneers, however, and they met the hardships of pioneer life bravely and cheerfully. When Daniel settled at Philipstown, he was in the backwoods, as I have said, for the Indians still lived in that vicinity, and hunting and trapping filled no small part of the settler's regular life. His sons were accustomed therefore to the rough fare and simple wants of the backwoodsmen, and their outlook upon life was unquestionably that of the frontiersman who have done so much to make the early history of our country."

"The Lamoureux Record", Oct 1919, AJ Lamoureux, in Yesteryears Magazine
1760 Westchester Co, Susanna, Josué Lamoureux & Elizabeth Ogden 2nd child is born

New York Family Records - Josué will mentions Susanna

“…Joshua was in Westchester Co in 1760, so he must have moved from Yorktown area or Philipsburgh (Westchester Co) area to Philipstown, Dutchess Co, between April 1760 and June 1764. The Militia list states he was born in Westchester Co, and as Daniel’s child b 1737 was bp. at Bedford Presbyterian Church, I think Joshua was born in nearby Yorktown. I agree with Mackenzie; although we have no proof,”



Notes of David Kendall Martin, letter to Isabelle, 1974

1760? Yorktown-Philipsburgh “…Joshua [Lamoreaux] was enlisted in 1760, aged 21 … he had a child born 1760,

Westchester then he must have been married about 1759, so I would look for Elizabeth Ogden in the area of Yorktown-Philipsburgh in Westchester

Notes of David K Martin, letter to Isabelle 1974

From Colonies to Country, Joy Hakam, p

His [Daniel Lamoreaux's] son, Joshua, was in Westchester Co. when he enlisted in the militia in 1760 and his[Daniel’s] eldest son, Andre, who had married in 1743, Elizabeth Covert of Cortlandt Manor, was there in 1779, apparently in that part later know as Yorktown where he was in the census for 1790 & 1800, & where he died in 1809. It is my belief that this is where Daniel also had lived…”



David Kendall Martin, 2/1974, New York

1760 England George III becomes king of England

From Colonies to Country, Joy Hakam, p

1760 Mar 27 Rumbout, Twins, Charity & Elizabeth, born to "John Lamoreau" are christened

Dutchess, NY [These would be g-child of my Daniel.] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Computer

printout, Birth & chr of Presbyterian Church , Rumbout,

Dutchess Co, NY 1744-1844, film # 1,002,749 item 5

Phillipstown, Elizabeth & Charity 6th & 7th Jean (John) Lamoreaux & Elizabeth Rice

Putnam, N York [mother may have been Charity Davenport ]

Elizabeth later Md Gilbert Lent Charity later MD Thomas Davenport

[Where is Rumbout? Part of Philipse? This family was Presbyterian too.]



Joshue is listed on Westchester Co Muster Roll in 1760

The French and Indian War

1700 - 1749 New York State Continuous fighting with the French (& Indian)

pre-revolution War out of Niagara H. Swiggett

1754-1763 “French & Indian Wars harass frontier settlements.”

New York Area Key, p4

“…the Fighting against the French and Indians resumes and continues

American Colonies "the last of the series of struggles between French and English for dominance

in America." "New York ... was vitally interested in these campaigns." p 199

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

    1. “The French and Indian War. This was the American phase of a world-wide nine years’

war that was waged between 1754 and 1763.”

The great War for the Empire began over the specific issue as to whether the upper Ohio valley was a part of the British empire …or…of the French empire.”

A conflict… was doubtless inevitable …force was applied in 1752… This was followed by the plundering, capture or killing of every English-speaking trader in the upper Ohio valley…

“…it was determined late in 1753 to send young George Washington…

During the first four years …the over-all advantage was with the French…the British regulars and American colonials suffered one stunning reverse after another.

“…the frontier settlements in what is now central New York, central Pennsylvania, western Maryland and western Virginia were deserted while thousands of families fled eastward in panic from the torch, sword, and tomahawk carried by the French and their Indian allies.”



William Pitt “…promised the colonies a liberal reimbursement of their expenses, were they to do their part in the effort by furnishing men for the colonial line…”

Finally, both British regulars and the American colonial line became seasoned wilderness fighters. …In the main, both sides tended to observe well-established principles of strategy and tactics. The war… witnessed the transfer to America of European methods of fighting…”



“The French and Indian War,”Encyclopedia Britannica, 1969, vol 9 pg 864-6

1760 Apr 23 Westchester Co [Joshua Lamoreaux enlisted in the militia in 1760. Probably the French & Indian War]

New York Muster roll lists "Joshua Lumerix"; …5' 8";…Black hair & black eyes"

"Inlisted 23 Apr[1760] - age 21, born in Westchester Co, cordwainer, Volunteer in Capt.

Phil.Verplanck's Co."

"Men raised and passed in the Co of Westchester for Captain Jon'th Haight Company, May ye 13, 1760."

Muster Roll, 13 May 1760 Capt. Haight Co

State of NY, Report of the State Historian 1897,

Colonial series v 2 [From Isabelle] Mesa FHC US, NY, H2, 3

[Isabelle says he fought with Brittish 18 Months. WHERE is this reference?]
1760-age 21 Yorktown-

Philipsburgh “…Joshua was enlisted in 1760, aged 21 … he had a child born 1760, then he must

New York have been married about 1759, so I would look for Elizabeth Ogden in the

area of Yorktown-Philipsburgh in Westchester

Notes of David K Martin, letter to Isabelle 1974

"Eighteenth-century British military records... Recruits tended to be around twenty years of age and averaged 5' 7” in infantry regiments, a bit taller in the elite regiments such as the dragoons. Most were urbanites either by birth or migration, of lower or lower-middle class background, and possessed of occupational skills no longer in great demand. The textile industry, for example... Shoemakers, pliers of a craft that also had begun to feel the effects of mechanization and overcrowding, likewise enlisted in extraordinary numbers." p 173

The World Turned Upside Down, Ferling, John, 1988.

Capt. Jonathan Haight had a company of men mustered in the French and Indian War in 1759 from Westchester County. My ggggg-grandfather, Ebenezer Robinson served in that company. They might have been in northern Westchester Co. since many of the people in that company later lived in lower Dutchess County.

There is a mention of this company, and others from the area, moving out to Albany for a major engagement in either 1760 or 61. I would need to look through my notes.”

Wade Robinson, posted on RootsWeb in response to my inquiry Oct 2001

His source is?? “Muster roles of NY Provincial Troops" Ernest F. DeLancy, A Heritage Classic

NOTE: [1760 was pre-Revolutionary War. They were probably mustered for fighting the French & Indian War]


1754-1763, American Colonies This muster roll would be for “…the Fighting against the French and Indians resumes

pre-revolution and continues" “the last of the series of struggles between French and English for

dominance in America."

"New York ... was vitally interested in these campaigns."

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes, p 199

The muster rolls for colonial military service were destroyed in the 1911 Capitol fire. Rolls abstracted in Third Annual Report of the State Historian… 1897 (Albany; 1898), pp 437-1130; and in “Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops, 1755-1764,” Collections of the New York Society for the Year 1891(New York: 1892).



New York State, City & Church Archives, Mesa Family History Center

1760 May 13 Westchester, The Muster Roll of 13 May 1760 for Capt. Haight Co lists Joshua Lamoreaux

NY "Joshua Lumerix" "Inlisted 23 Apr - age 21, born in Westchester Co, cordwainer, Volunteer in Capt. Phil. Verplanck's Co." Enlisted by Capt. Haight

"Men raised and passed in the Co of Westchester for Captain Jon'th Haight Company, May ye 13, 1760."

Muster Roll, 13 May 1760 Capt. Haight Co

State of NY, Report of the State Historian 1897,

Colonial series v 2 [From Isabelle] Mesa FHC US, NY, H2, 3

[Isabelle says he fought with Brit 18 Mo. WHERE is this reference?]
His [Daniel Lamoreaux's] son, Joshua, was in Westchester Co. when he enlisted in the militia in 1760 and his[Daniel’s] eldest son, Andre, who had married in 1743, Elizabeth Covert of Cortlandt Manor, was there in 1779, apparently in that part later know as Yorktown where he was in the census for 1790 & 1800, & where he died in 1809. It is my belief that this is where Daniel also had lived…”

Daniel’s [Lamoreaux] son, James, also seems to have married a girl from Cortlandt Manor about 1754.” "Current View of Daniel Lamoreaux"



David Kendall Martin, 2/1974, New York

1760 Sept 6 “…the French gov general“…was obliged on Sept. 8 1760, to surrender… Montreal…”

& Cuba in 1762. Peace Treaty in 1763- cession of Louisiana

“The French and Indian War,”Encyclopedia Britannica, 1969, vol 9 pg 864-6

1760 Oct 30 King George II died.

1760 George III is crowned king of England

From Colonies to Country, Joy Hakam, p

  1. “…in 1761, …New Rochelle, which village, as well as Fordham, was considered within

the spiritual jurisdiction of Westchester Village, then the only parish in the county. The French church was named Trinity, and received, at this time, a charter from George the Third, dated 1762.” It mentions

“…the removal of the sacred edifice, to make way for the highroad to Boston…”



Fosdick, L. J., The French Blood in America, p 242

1761 "Daniel [Lamoreaux's] son, Isaac, the longest resident of Duchess (i.e. Putnam) County

of the family. Isaac arrived in 1761.”

"Current View of Daniel Lamoreaux"

David Kendall Martin, 2/1974, New York

1762 Phillipstown, NY Jerusha (Rhoda), Josue' Lamoureux & Elizabeth Ogden 3rd child, is born

now Putnam Co Family Records

"…of Pickering, Duchess Co, NY"("Jerusha Earl" is Buried in Kirtland, Ohio.)

Archive Record - Ancestor File

1763 French & Indian War ends - The treaty of Paris was signed, ending the conflict between

English & French, giving the English control of North America east of the Mississippi.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes p 199

1763 NYC "The 22,000 people of NYC were crammed into the area that the financial

district now occupies, with the rest of Manhattan, and all of Queens, Kings, Staten Island, and northern NJ lying almost empty.

The American Revolution, Edward Countryman

1763 Yorktown Jesse, 8th child of Andre LMOREAUX & Elizabeth Covert Worchester, N York Md Jane Whetmore 1782 –

[This Jesse went into Canada -in 1783 with Brother Daniel & uncle, Josué.]
1764 Duchess Co, NY Jemima, Josué Lamoureux & Elizabeth Ogden's 4th child, is born

Philipstown, NY. Family Records

[As an 82 year old widow in Canada, Jemima is listed as a Presbyterian.]
1765 Stamp Act; "...emigration,(to Canada) beginning as early as the Stamp Act crisis

in 1765, took place throughout the revolutionary period and even beyond."

Victorious in Defeat, Wallace Brown, 1984, p 30

1765-1775 Philipse Josue' Lamoureux is on the tax rolls on Philipse Patent.

[Where is this source for this early year? from D.K. Martin ]

1765 Westchester Co. Westchester Co farmers, protesting the feudal practices of valley manor lords rebelled. [This was a preview of the war to come.]

The Lordly Hudson, Carl Cramer

1766 Putnam Co, NY “St Philip’s Church in the Highlands, - … The church itself is said to have been built in 1766

by certain subscriptions both in Courtlandt Manor and the lower end of Philipse Upper Patent,’ … dedicated …August 9th, 1767.’ …’We could not have gone through with our undertaking but for entering into an agreement with the people on the lower end of Philipse Patent, …when we obtained a missionary he should be settled for both places, so as to make but one congregation of the whole: To preach every other Sunday at the house of Jacob Mandeville.’ …’in the lower end of Philipse Patent,’”

“…1771 …granted the church a special charter… a glebe farm of 200 acres of land… ‘given by Beverly Roninson…for the use of the Rector officiating one half of the time in the Highlands.”

1775 – Later pastors left “…for seventeen years there was no settled pastor.”

“…It appears that the glebe or parsonage farm mentioned above was not formally given by deed to the church by Beverly Roninson, although the church had possession of it. After the Revolution this farm was, like the rest of the land of Colonel Robinson, confiscated, …”



History of Putnam Co NY, William S Pelletreau, 1975; p 540-2

1768 Philipse Upper Josué Lamoreaux listed on rent rolls at property of B. Robinson B-in-law of Benedict

Patent, Arnold, officer for G Washington, headquartered at West Point just across the river.

Duchess Co. Arnold & André met at Peekskill to exchange plans for West Point to give to British; for

New York which Andre' was caught& hung in 1780. Washington, as commander of West Point, was

staying on Robinson's property at the time. Arnold escaped and went to England. "Robinson had left by this time."

Early Settlers of Putnam Co, F C Haacker 1946

1768 Mr Lambert, surveyor, made a map of the Philipse Patent, (including Water Lot # 2)

after the partitioning of the patent among the heirs of Adolph Philipse showing the location of the 8 tenants of that date.. . . J. Lamarkee [Joshua] is listed as leasing

Philipse's Upper the NE corner of Water Lot #2 on the Hudson River, Philipse's Upper Patent. One of

Patent 8 tenants. 'The properties are on the Lambert Map." "All of these properties were

leased,not owned, ... our entire county [Putnam Co] was Philipse or Highland Patent, owned by members of the Philipse family." [Putnam Co was Duchess Co till 1812 when it was formed. The Old Albany Post Road runs North & South through the west part of his plot.] [They are listed also on lot #8.]

Letter dated 1976 from Putnam Co Hist Society to Isabelle Cluff

Lambert's Map on file at Columbia Univ, Library NYC, film #529,189

I have a copy of the map - akrc

1768 May 9 “To the PUBLIC [Figure of stage wagon, drawn by four horses.] THAT the Stage - Waggons,

kept by John Barnhill, in Elm-Street, in Philadelphia, and John Mercereau, at the New-Blazing Star, near New-York, continues their Stages in two Days, from Powles-Hook Ferry, opposite New-York, to Philadelphia; returns from Philadelphia to Powles-Hook in two Days also; they will endeavour to oblige the Publick by keeping the best of Waggons and sober Drivers, and sets out from Powle Hook and Philadelphia, on Mondays and Thursdays, punctually at Sunrise, and meets at Prince Town the same Nights, to exchange Passengers, and each return the Day after: Those who are kind enough to encourage the Undertaking, are desired to cross Powles Hook Ferry the Evenings before, as they must set off early: The Price for each Passenger is Ten Shillings to Prince Town, and from thence to Philadelphia, Ten Shillings more, Ferriage free:

There will be but two Wagons, but four sets of fresh Horses, so it will be very safe for any Person to send Goods, as there are but two Drivers; they may exchange their Goods without any Mistake. Persons may now go from New-York to Philadelphia, and back again in five Days, and remain in Philadelphia two Nights and one Day to do their Business in: The Public may be assured that this Road is much the shortest, than any other to Philadelphia, and regular Stages will be kept by the Publick's obliged humble Servants,



JOHN MERCEREAU, and JOHN BARNHILL.”

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. - 1323, May 9, 1768.

Quoted in:Documents Relating to the Colonial History of New Jersey Vol XXVI - Pages158-9

[Mercereau are related to Masse & therefore Lamoreaux.]

1769 Philipse Patent Joshua Lamoreaux on Philipse Lot #2: & James Lamoreaux & Beverly Robinson also.

"The Lamoreaux were a French family, and were settled on the Post road still farther

north, their tract embracing the north-east corner of the lot."

History of Putnam Co NY, William S Pelletreau, 1975; p 545-7

1770 Beethoven is born.

1770 July 9 Philipstown, P, NY Joshua Lamoreaux Jr., Josue' & Elizabeth 5th child, is born Duchess Co, NY (later Putnam Co) Family Records

1770 Aug 18 Putnam Co, NY “St Philip’s Church in the Highlands, - This church was originally a chapel, and was

united with St. Peter’s Church at Peekskill, the history of which has been written with careful minuteness by the lamented historian, Bolton. The first charter of this church was granted August 18th, 1770,…first trustees were Beverly Robinson, [6 more including Thomas Davenport] … built about two miles north of Peekskill… The church itself is said to have been built in 1766 ‘by certain subscriptions both in Courtlandt Manor and the lower end of Philipse Upper Patent,’ … dedicated …August 9th, 1767.’ …’We could not have gone through with our undertaking but for entering into an agreement with the people on the lower end of Philipse Patent, …when we obtained a missionary he should be settled for both places, so as to make but one congregation of the whole: To preach every other Sunday at the house of Jacob Mandeville.’ …’in the lower end of Philipse Patent,’”

“…1771 …granted the church a special charter… a glebe farm of 200 acres of land… ‘given by Beverly Roninson…for the use of the Rector officiating one half of the time in the Highlands.”



1775 – Later pastors left “…for seventeen years there was no settled pastor.”

“…It appears that the glebe or parsonage farm mentioned above was not formally given by deed to the church by Beverly Roninson, although the church had possession of it. After the Revolution this farm was, like the rest of the land of Colonel Robinson, confiscated, …”



History of Putnam Co NY, William S Pelletreau, 1975; p 540-2

1770’s "The Huguenots of New Rochelle, New York, the only [group of people] still speaking

French..."

Victorious in Defeat, W Brown

1770"s NY "Joshua's [Lamoreaux] land was in Newburgh, NY. and he left with or immediately or 1780 after the 'Arnold Treachery'". Arnold was a Huguenot family.

Duane LaMoreaux, Letter July 1991 states British records

were sold to U of Mich and are at Ann Arbor

[Where is Newburgh?]

Duane also states Joshua never learned to read & write.

[I am undecided as to whether Joshua could read & write.. Some of his documents are signed with an "X"

others seem to be signed by his signature. See later petitions, akrc]
1770's Duchess Co, NY Josue' Lamoreaux "Resided at Duchess Co, NY... was obliged to leave his

property to the value of two hundred pounds N York currency in land and movable estate ... Beside services as a vollintear at the outpost with Col Dellincar (Delancy) was taken prisoner and wounded and very badly treated while with them But got exchanged and remained till the treaty of peace"

Loyalist Petition #271 & 273 & cover

20 Mar 1786 Fredricton, NB, Dept of Nat'l Resources,

[I think this means he & family remained in New York City, Morrisania, Long Island or etc.]

[Morrisania was not evacuated till 1783] [Where are the records of DeLancy’s group?]

[Find DeLancy history]
1770's Peeks Kill, NY Josué Lamoreaux's nephew Daniel's petition says "...formerly of Peekskill,

West Chester, New York ... his aged father & numerous family were all faithful to his majesty ... were exceedingly persecuted and all driven from a very valuable and pleasant farm ... served 18 months with Cole. James De Lancy at Morisania

Morisania, NY [Daniel says he built a house at Morisania] --- a very Hazard and important

Post where there was attacks and continual apprehension from an enraged and cruel Enemy ---where he rec. no pay except rations, nor did he choose to live or enrich him self by Plunder" [See 1779 Aug 5]

"That for his loyalty, he has in the vigor of his youth, lost his native Country -- the Hopes of a pretty Patrimony, his tender Parents and affectionate Friends ..."

Loyalist Petition #148 by Daniel Lamoureux, 30 Mar 1786

Fredricton, New Brunswick Dept of Nat'l Resources,

Guerrilla warfare raged over the "neutral ground of Westchester County where James De Lancey's Westchester Refugees (many of whom later settled in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick) were known to their enemies as "cowboys" and "cattle rustlers."

Victorious in Defeat, Wallace Brown, 1984, p 19

"...To add to the confusion, the three battalions of De Lancey's Brigade had been reorganized into two before leaving New York, and the men themselves did not always set down correctly their new battalion number, ..." Many of the De Lancey 2nd battalion (over 100 people) were killed in the wreck of the "Martha' in the Fall Fleet, Oct 1783.

The Loyalists of New Brunswick, E.C. Wright, p 180

[Is this our De Lancey? I really think so They "annexed" cattle.]
1771 A colonial census is taken; this is the last of the colonial census

History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement..., Shonnard & Spooner

1771 Putnam Co, NY “St Philip’s Church in the Highlands, - “…1771 …granted the church a special

charter… a glebe farm of 200 acres of land… ‘given by Beverly Roninson…for the use of the Rector officiating one half of the time in the Highlands.”

1775 – Later pastors left “…for seventeen years there was no settled pastor.”

“…It appears that the glebe or parsonage farm mentioned above was not formally given by deed to the church by Beverly Roninson, although the church had possession of it. After the Revolution this farm was, like the rest of the land of Colonel Robinson, confiscated, …”



History of Putnam Co NY, William S Pelletreau, 1975; p 540-2

1772 “New Paaltz Church … Built in 1772 at the site of the LaFevere House.

[later] The Huguenots were absorbed by the Dutch Church.”

The Huguenot Migration in Europe and America, It’s Cause & Effect, C. Malcom B Gilman

1772 Mar 24 Philipstown, NY South Precinct is subdivided into Southeast, Fredricsburgh,

and Philips Precincts

Early Settlers of Putnam Co, F C Haacker 1946

1772 Apr 5 Philipstown, NY James Lamoreaux is listed as a "fence viewer" for Phillipstown.

Joshua is mentioned.

[Daniel is said to be the only Male descendent of Andre so this James should be his son, Jacques born 1731. James is 41. Josué is 33.]

History of Putnam Co, Pelletreau

"The Lamoreaux were a French family, and were settled on the Post road still farther north, [from the junction of Post road & Philipstown turnpike?] their tract embraced the northeast corner of the lot. [this is listed in Lot 2, Philip Philipse river lot, the middle one Joshua Lamoreaux, is on Lot 8 of the division of lot 2 in 1768: and James is the only one listed in town records in 1772.]

"The town records of Philipstown, or rather of Philipse Precinct, begin in 1772, and are contained in a paper covered book out of which a large gap has been eaten by the mice. From these records we transcribe the following:

“’At a town meeting in Philipse Prscinct, in Dutchess County, on the 5th of April, 1772.

… “’Joseph Haight and James Lamoreaux, fence viewers.” p 545-547

1777- Joshua is mentioned in assessment of Philipse Precinct... assessed "1” p 127 -...Elisha Lamoreaux is "2" p 128 - Beverly Robinson was highest at "70" next there are two at "15" and one at "12" All rest of the 160+ are 5 and under. Most are "1's" No other Lamoreaux.

"The foregoing list signed by ...Assessors ... no evidence of actual amount of property possessed by the persons named. … Beverly Robinson[a man] was highest at "70" next there are two at "15" and one at "12" All rest of the 160+ are 5 and under. Most are "1's" ..."[Daniel is said to be the only Male descendent of Andre so this James should be his son, Jacques born 1731. James is 41. Josue' is 33. Elisha, Andrew's son, is 23.]

History of Putnam Co, William Pelletreau p 127-128

John Lamorieaux is listed p125 on “List of taxable inhanitants of Philips Patent”, p 121 … “Fredricksburg Precinct.” p 122.

History of Putnam Co, William Pelletreau p 121-125

"Philipse Lot No. 2 - The central part of Philipstown consists of Lot No. 2 of the Philipse Patent, and fell to Philip Philipse, in the partition and division in 1754. The next information we have concerning this tract, is its survey and division into eight lots, and a map made of them by David Lambert, the surveyor, in 1769. The original map is now among the Philipse papers. The owners of the lots are mentioned by their last name, except the Davenports. Their full names were probably: Lot ... 8 Joshua Lamoreaux." "...Names of earlier settlers.. mention made in various records such as surveys of highways & minutes of town meetings" Lamoreaux not listed in 1745

"The names of the early settlers on this tract are only to be learned from mention made in various records such as surveys of highways & minutes of town meetings. The earliest names found are in the survey of highways in 1745:" [Lamoreaux name not listed in 1745. akrc]

The proximity of this region to the Hudson River rendered it far more easy of access than the central portion of the patent, and the fertile portions were soon settled by nem who held farms as tenants of Philip Philipse and after of his children. The following list includes the persons whose names appear on the town records between 1772 and 1782, and includes the people living in Putnam Valley, which was then a portion of Philipstown: … James Lamoreaux…”

Among the earliest settlers…

The Lamoreaux were a French family…”



History of Putnam Co, Pelletreau

"When Benjamin Franklin became postmaster of the colonies he improved the roads so the mail could be carried more efficiently. These new roads were called post roads."

"Until the middle of the 19th century, most American roads were made of dirt. Some were surfaced with gravel or oyster shells. With ice or snow on them they often became impassable. Spring thaws made them turn to mud... Some roads were made with rough logs; dirt was put on top of the logs. These roads were called corduroy roads."

From Colonies to Country, Joy Hakam, p 58.

1773 New York A will left £1000 to Trinity Church “in trust for the First French Congregation of New

York which should adopt the Angilican liturgy.”

Records of the French Church of Staten Island, LDS Film #509,193 item #7

1773 Sept 18 N America Total eclipse of the sun

There were four total solar eclipses between 1773 and 1778 on Sept. 18, 1773, March 1, 1775, July 5, 1777 and June 24, 1778. Of these, only the September 15, 1773 eclipse was likely to have been visible over North America.”



Was anything happening in the sky between 1772 and 1776?” NASA, http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/ask/a11791.html

1774 May 2 Daniel Lamoreaux records his son Andrew and Elizabeth [Covert] had a son Isaac born

Daniel's hand made account book. I have a copy, akrc.

1775 New York Andrew Lamoreaux, Josue' & Elizabeth Lamoreaux’s 6th child, is born.

[Later killed by a falling tree, died after 1797 Mar 6]

Family Records

1775 King George proclaimed the colonies were in Rebellion.

1775 Joshua Lamoreaux - According to Memorials written later, by John McCord

Lamoreaux, Joshua "joined the British Standard" in 1775. Family tradition states they were in the worst area of fighting. War started 1775 even before Declaration.

See later petitions

"Perhaps the hardest condition for both sides to bear during the years of the long fight in the (Hudson) valley was the bitter dissension among neighbors."

The Lordly Hudson, Carl Cramer

[Daniel's sons are listed on both sides of the fighting.]
1775 Paul Revere makes his famous ride.

1775 May Unied States "Congress were acknowledging and declaring themselves, and all the inhabitants

within the now United States, to be the Loyal and faithful subjects of Great Britain."

14 months later the Declaration of Independence. p 152

History of New York During the Rev. War, Vol 1 Thomas Jones
Children of Daniel & Jeanne Masse Lamoreaux in 1776

"Of the second generation we have Daniel's nine children and the three children of his two sisters. This number is probably incomplete. We are certain of seven sons of the family name, one son named Chaperone, one son named Dusjean, two daughters of Lamoureux origin, and one daughter of the Chaperone origin.

"During Daniel's lifetime the family seems to have been kept well together, but after his death, perhaps influenced in some degree by the restlessness of the people just before the Revolution, his sons began to scatter. The Revolution introduced another disturbing element, sending two of his sons into exile. Only one of them remained near the old homestead, two went to Orange Co, and one (with two of Andrew's sons) to Albany Co. It was a period of comparative poverty, hard work, hard living, much ignorance, and large families. All of Daniel's sons, so far as I have records, had large families, the smallest 7 children, the largest 13. They were all typical pioneers, however, and they met the hardships of pioneer life bravely and cheerfully. When Daniel settled at Philipstown, he was in the backwoods, as I have said, for the Indians still lived in that vicinity, and hunting and trapping filled no small part of the settler's regular life. His sons were accustomed therefore to the rough fare and simple wants of the backwoodsmen, and their outlook upon life was unquestionably that of the frontiersman who have done so much to make the early history of our country."

"The Lamoureux Record", Oct 1919, AJ Lamoureux, in Yesteryears Magazine

The 1776 ages of Daniel & Jeanne Lamoreaux's children were:

Daniel, 56; Andrew, 55; John, 53; Peter, 50; Elizabeth (who did she marry?), 48; James, 45; Isaac, 43; Susanne (who did she marry?), 39; Joshua, 37.

Daniel & Jeanne Lamoreaux's grand children's [the ones I know of] ages were:

Daniel, Elizabeth, Susanne, (I have no record of any marriage or children)

Andrew & Elizabeth Covert Lamoureuxs of Cortlandt Mannor, Yorktown, Westchester, NY; Isaac, 32, md; John, 31, md; Elisha, 27, md Hill; Elizabeth (Drake,) 25, md; Andrew, 22; Daniel, 19; Peter, 15; Jesse, 13; Phebe, 10.

John & Charity Davenport Lamoureux of Cornwall, Orange Co, NY; or John & Elizabeth Rice: [Was Jane oldest?] Thomas, 32, md; Jane (Horton,) 28, md; Joshua, 27, ?md; John, 22; Susanna (later Prindle), 20; Elizabeth (later Lent), 16; Charity (later Davenport), 16; Martha (later Reynolds), 14; Isaac, 13; Phebe (later Prindle), 11; Robert, 7; Daniel, 5; Hannah, 2.

Peter & Phebe Wood Lamoureux of Orange Co, NY: Jane (prob Flourance), 27, Jane md; Isaac, 25; Joseph, 23; Luke, 20; Peter, 17; Suzannah (later Davenport), 15; Phebe (later Clark), 13; Jesse, 11; John, 9; Andrew W, 5.

James & Hannah Clement Lamoureux of Philipstown, Dutchess Co, NY: Daniel, 22; Aaron, 16; Peter, 12; William, 8; Catherine (later Smith), 5; James, 3; John, 2; George was born 1778.

Isaac & Hannah Tomkins Lamoureux of Phillipstown & Hyde Park., Dutchess Co, NY: Andrew, 10; Mary (later Tompkins), 8; John, 7; Fanny (later Culver), 5; Timothy, 3; James, 2; Sarah (later Tompkins), 1; Susan (later Albertson), was born 1778; George was born 1780; Hannah (later Ostrom), was born 1784; Elizabeth (later Carpenter), was born 1786; Phebe (later Cornwell), was born 1789.

Joshua & Elizabeth Ogden Lamoreaux of Phillipstown, Dutchess Co, NY & Westchester Co, NY.& NYC: James, 18; Susanna (later Waters), 16; Jerusha (later Earl), 14; Jemima (later Wright), 7; Joshua, 6; Andrew, 1; Isaac was born 1777; John McCord Lamoreaux was born 1779.

[Where are Aaltie's kids? Were they all raised together with the Lamoreaux children?]
1776 July 4 Declaration of Independence is signed

NOTE: The Loyalist families were forced to evacuate their Hudson River farms and go into New York City by 1779 through 1783. Housing was crowded and inadequate. Parts of the City had been burned. Food was rationed out by the British.]
Loyalist who sincerely felt that armed revolt was unjustified looked upon their rebelling neighbors as deserving of the hangman's noose, and those sympathetic with the Colonial armies were even more strongly convinced that Tories were traitors and should suffer the consequences."

The Lordly Hudson, Carl Cramer, 1958

During the American Revolutionary War, inhabitants were equally divided between the patriots and the Loyalists. Most of them signed the Association Tests, but not so many joined the militia, and a number of the later were branded as out and out Tories. After the war ended, those who had vacillated, or gone definitely over to the ‘enemy’ were highly unpopular and many moved to the wilds of Pennsylvania.”



Carl William Smith, “A Line Of Descent, French Huguenot Émigré, Andre’ Lamoreaux, 1660-1706,”
1776 "Many of the younger generation joined the army as patriots,

... some, Joshua being among them, had fled northward into Canada to escape imprisonment or even death.

"The Life History of David B Lamoreaux, Edith Ivans Lamoreaux

[This is a bit jumbled. Joshua did leave but not till after the end of the war, 1783. He was wounded, captured and traded. He and his family probably were in NYC till the end of the war. Although they are not on any Vitualling list in NY City, they left NY City on a British Summer Fleet to go into Canada.]

NOTE: The Loyalist families were forced to evacuate their Hudson River farms and go into New York City by 1779 through 1783. Housing was crowded and inadequate. Parts of the City had been burned. Food was rationed out by the British.]



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