Training development in support of the operational domain


-13. Training aids devices simulators and simulations (TADSS)



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5-13. Training aids devices simulators and simulations (TADSS)


The training developer selects any appropriate TADSS to support collective task training. If applicable, the TADSS title and numbers are required. TADSS are selected from a search menu in the CAC-approved automated development system and will print out as part of the synopsis report. The training developer should identify trade-offs of training resources (such as equipment, ammunition, and others) in order to identify TADSS as cost-effective training enablers. When appropriate, the training developer links TADSS to support the training of the collective task being developed. Resource information required to support TADSS training (such as contractor personnel requirements, special facilities unique to the TADSS) is pre-populated in the CAC-approved automated development system. The TADSS requirements information will not display for field users, but must be used to determine TSS resourcing requirements. The CAC-approved automated development system links TADSS to the T&EO as appropriate to support collective training.

5-14. Synopsis report


The CAC-approved automated development system allows printing a synopsis report for a collective task. The synopsis report includes all the information entered into the system, allowing review of all collective task information.

5-15. Training and evaluation outline (T&EO)


The T&EO provides the major procedures a unit must accomplish to perform a collective task to standard. The CAC-approved automated development system is set up with a template that systematically guides the training developer through completing the appropriate data fields to generate the T&EO. The task performance specifications in the CAC-approved automated development system include design elements to describe precisely how a specific task or drill is performed, under what conditions the task or drill is performed, and how well a unit must perform the task or drill. A unit evaluator uses a T&EO to determine, at a given time, whether or not the task was performed to the standard under the prescribed conditions.

5-16. QC


Table C-3 provides a collective task QC review checklist designed to manage and document control measures, identify areas to improve, and facilitate timely delivery of collective tasks.

Chapter 6
Drills




6-1. Introduction

a. Purpose. This chapter provides guidance for the analysis, design, and development of drills. A training developer follows the ADDIE process to develop a drill, and follows the basic structural format of a collective task. The purpose of a drill is standardizing actions and responses to one specific situation.


b. Drill definition. A drill is a collective action (collective task or task step) performed without the application of a deliberate decision making process. A drill is initiated on a cue, such as enemy action or a leader’s command, and is a trained response to the given stimulus. A drill requires minimal leader orders to accomplish and is standard throughout the Army. A drill is usually developed from a collective task but may be developed as a stand-alone product.
c. Drill types. There are only two formats for developing drills: battle drills and crew drills. However, there are three types of drills: battle drills, staff drills, and crew drills; staff drills are formatted the same as battle drills. The formats for developing drills are described throughout this chapter.
(1) Battle drill. A battle drill is a collective action (or task) performed by a platoon or smaller element without the application of a deliberate decision making process, initiated on a cue, accomplished with minimal leader orders, and performed to standard throughout like units in the Army. The action is vital to success in combat operations or critical to preserving life. It usually involves fire or maneuver. The drill is initiated on a cue, such as an enemy action or a leader’s brief order, and is a trained response to the given stimulus.
(2) Staff drill. A staff drill is a rehearsed action to support the efficiency of staffs. Battle drills and staff drills use the same format. A staff drill is a collective action (or task) performed by staffs at battalion and above.
(3) Crew drill. A crew drill is a collective action (or task) performed by a crew of a weapon or piece of equipment to use the weapon or equipment successfully in combat or to preserve life. A crew drill is initiated on a cue, accomplished with minimal leader orders, and performed to standard throughout like units in the Army. This action is a trained response to a given stimulus, such as an enemy action, a leader’s brief order, or the operating status of the weapon or equipment.
d. Applicability. The echelon that the drill applies to is key in determining the type of drill required. Company and below do not have staffs, and therefore, train their subordinate units exclusively on battle drills and crew drills. Battalion and above develop staff drills designed to solve a problem or react to a specific situation. See table 6-1.


Table 6-1
Types of drills


Drill type

Echelon

Purpose

Example




Crew drill.

Section/‌team/‌crew.

Actions on a specific piece of equipment or weapon.

Lay a Howitzer.




Battle drill.

Platoon or below.

Action involving fire and/or maneuver.

React to indirect fire.




Staff drill.

Battalion or above.

Physical performance.

React to a FRAGO.



e. Advantages of drills.


(1) Allow Soldiers to perform tasks with rapid efficiency when the task has been practiced repetitively.
(2) Reduce the communication requirements because Soldiers know what they have to do.
(3) Build teamwork.
(4) Save time, resources, and lives.
(5) Minimize the impact caused by personnel turnover.
(6) Help maintain a unit’s training readiness and proficiency.



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