American Studies Pacing Calendar 2014-2015


CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources



Download 303.54 Kb.
Page2/5
Date18.10.2016
Size303.54 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5




First Quarter

August 19 – October 15

Topic: Foundations of American Government

Instructional Time:

7 Days

Cur. pgs. 3-5

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

4.1. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain the purposes expressed in the Preamble and how the United States Constitution preserves those core principles of American society.
1.2 Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited system including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.
2.1 Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view to examine the philosophical contributions of the Enlightenment including the writings of Montesquieu, Locke, and Thomas Jefferson; the early experiences of colonial self-government; and the influence of religious texts including The Bible to the foundation of American political thought.

2.3 Determine the central ideas and importance of the concept of inalienable rights, the social contract or compact, the 27 grievances as stated in the Declaration of Independence, and the discussions of enumerated versus implied powers; and cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain how the protection of these rights were incorporated in the United States Constitution and the federal Bill of Rights as a fundamental purpose of government.



Basic Topics of Government

1. Purpose of Government –Preamble 4.1

  • National Security and Defense

  • Protections from self and others

  • Provide public services (fire, police)

2. Theories of Origin of Nation States 1.2

  • Evolutionary

  • Force

  • Divine Right

  • Social Contract: Hobbes, Locke (Private ownership of Property), Rousseau, Blackstone, Montesquieu

2.1, 2.3

  • John Locke’s Second Treatise on Civil Government Excerpts




  • Rousseau’s The Social Contract Excerpts

  • Hobbes’s De Cive and Leviathan Excerpts

  • Excerpt from Montesquieu’s Spirit of the Laws

  • Excerpt from Blackstone’s Commentaries

C2-C23



Chapter 1-Section 1


Activity: Theories of Origin of Nation States

We the People 1,2,3
Writing Prompt: How did each of the following influence American government? Cite evidence to support your answer.

  • the governments of ancient Athens and Rome

  • the ideas of Locke and Montesquieu





  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources



Comparing Two Passages

Directions: Read the following and then answer the questions that follow.


Locke and Jefferson
Recalling the two weeks he spent drafting the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson said: “I turned to neither book nor pamphlet while writing it.” At the same time, he freely acknowledged the influence of political philosophers who had come before him. Discussing the origin of the Declaration, Jefferson wrote:
“Neither aiming at originality of principle or sentiment, nor yet copied from any particular and previous writing, was it intended to be an expression of the American mind. . . .”
Keeping Jefferson’s words in mind, read the following passage from Locke’s Second Treatise of Government. Here, Locke describes the conditions under which people are justified in overthrowing their government:
“Whenever the legislators endeavor to take away, and destroy the property of the people, or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power, they put themselves into a state of war with the people . . . who have a right to resume their original liberty, and, by the establishment of a new legislature, provide for their own safety and security, which is the end for which they are in society.”



The Declaration of Independence
Now compare Locke’s words to a passage from the Declaration of Independence, in which Jefferson offers a justification for revolution. After explaining that people form governments to preserve their rights to “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness,” the Declaration states:
“That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends [the preservation of our rights], it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and Happiness.”

Compare and Contrast: Use a Venn diagram to cite common themes in these two passages and the critical differences.
Question: Cite textual evidence to identify ways in which Thomas Jefferson built on the ideas of John Locke.





First Quarter

August 19 – October 15

Topic: Foundations of American Government

Instructional Time:

7 Days

Cur. pgs. 6-7

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

3.2 Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.

1.3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

1.4 Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.
Essential Questions

  1. What is government and why is it needed?

  2. How can we as a people solve the problems of modern society to make the world a better place for future generations and ourselves?

  3. Why do governments exist?

  4. What are the characteristics of a state?

  5. What are the four most influential theories of the origin of Nation States? Explain each.

  6. How did democracy develop in ancient Greece, Rome and England?

  7. Was our government created to protect us from ourselves?

  8. What are the elements of “good participation” in a healthy democracy?

  1. Forms of Government (How has it changed over time?) 3.2

  • Unitary

  • Confederation

  • Federation

  • Presidential

  • Parliamentary

  • Democracy

  • Dictatorship

  • Oligarchy

  • Republic, Theocracy

1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Chapter 1-Section 2

Writing Prompt: Read the headlines below. To which type of government do the headlines refer—an absolute monarchy or a parliamentary democracy? Cite specific textual and visual evidence from the headlines, your textbook and other sources to support your answer.

Prime Minister Calls for

Vote of Confidence
Labor Party Members

Resign from Cabinet
New Coalition Government

Seems Fragile







  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources



Suggested Resources and Literacy Connection

Writing Prompt or Group Activity:
Speaker A: The story of history is the story of class struggles. Revolution is necessary to overthrow the ruling class and eventually create a classless society in which no one will be exploited.
Speaker B: The royal power is absolute and the prince need render account of his acts to no one. Where the word of a king is, there is power. Without this absolute authority, the king could neither do good nor repress evil.
Speaker C: Government should leave business alone. It should let the natural law of supply and demand determine what gets produced, how much gets produced, who does the work, the price of goods, rates of pay, and all other economic questions.
Speaker D: Men are born and remain free and equal in right. It is the duty of every government to preserve and protect these natural and inalienable rights.
Directions: Read the excerpts above, and then answer the questions below.
Each of the speakers above expresses a viewpoint on the philosophy of government.

  • Based on your knowledge of world governments, select two of the

theories and list at least two nations that accepted them and were ruled by them.

  • In your opinion, were these theories beneficial or detrimental to the success of the nations as a whole? Support your conclusions with examples.



Activities
Political Culture

  • Analyze majority rule with protection of minority rights/due process


Basic Topics of Government

  • Create a web

  • Group presentation over theories and theorists

  • Create cartoons about the forms of government

  • Students will research different types of government including their basis of power and ability to accomplish goals.

  • Write an article for a journal: Which forms of government best meet the needs of the people?

  • Conduct a Constitutional search to find how the Constitution addresses the weaknesses on the Articles of Confederation.

  • Research political philosophers and write a quote consistent with their perspective. Present this to the class and the other groups will determine the principle that is being addressed.

  • Citizenship Test

  • Voter registration for students

  • Create a campaign poster or political cartoon dealing with an election issue or candidate.

  • Write a letter to a Congressman or other official.

  • Create a class preamble

  • Assess the validity of various “voters’ guides

  • Oyez

  • Cornell Law







First Quarter

August 19 – October 15

Topic: Origins of Colonial Government

Instructional Time:

7 Days

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

1.1 Contrast the essential characteristics of limited versus unlimited governments with an understanding that the United States’ constitutional system established legal restraints on governmental power.

1.3 Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.
2.1 Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view to examine the philosophical contributions of the Enlightenment including the writings of Montesquieu, Locke, and Thomas Jefferson; the early experiences of colonial self-government; and the influence of religious texts including The Bible to the foundation of American political thought.
2.2 Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize the impact of major historic events of the Revolutionary Era and major documents contributing to the formation of constitutional government in the United states including the Mayflower Compact (1620), the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut (1639), the English Bills of Rights (1689), the Albany Plan of Union (1754), the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776), the Articles of Confederation (1781), and the colonial/revolutionary writings of Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, and James Otis.
Essential Questions

  1. What basic ideas about government did the English Colonists bring to America?

  2. How did government first develop in the thirteen Colonies?

  3. What does “limited government” mean?

  1. Basic Topics 1.1, 1.3

  • Ordered

  • Limited

  • Representative

2. Documents/Events/Religious Text 2.1

  • The Magna Carta

  • Petition of Right

  • Maryland Toleration Act

  • English Bill of Rights

  • Great Awakening

  • Enlightenment

3. Colonial Government 2.1

  • Royal

  • Proprietary

  • Charter

4. Evolution of Democratic Government in the U.S. 2.1, 2.2

  • Mayflower Compact

  • Virginia House of Burgesses

  • New England Town Meetings

  • Fundamental Orders of Conn

  • Albany Plan

  • Virginia Declaration of Rights




Chapter 2-Section 1


Chapter 2-Section 1

We the People 4

KIT

Historical Documents, Pgs. 782-790

Activity: The Magna Carta

Chapter 22-Section 2

Chapter 2-Section 1


OSS

We the People 5
Activities

  • Chart the documents (who, what, when, where, why)

  • Colonial Map

  • Timeline of events

  • Identify the central idea(s) found in each of the historic documents of this unit. What importance does each document play in the founding of American government?

  • Compare and contrast the Great Awakening and the Enlightenment and explain how each impacted the formation of American government.

  • The Bible and other religious texts







  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources



First Quarter

August 19 – October 15

Topic: Events Leading to the

Declaration of Independence

Instructional Time:

5 Days

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

1.1 Contrast the essential characteristics of limited versus unlimited governments with an understanding that the United States’ constitutional system established legal restraints on governmental power.
2.2 Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize the impact of major historic events of the Revolutionary Era and major documents contributing to the formation of constitutional government in the United States including the Mayflower Compact (1620), the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut (1639), the English Bills of Rights (1689), the Albany Plan of Union (1754), the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776), the Articles of Confederation (1781), and the colonial/revolutionary writings of Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, and James Otis.
2.3 Determine the central ideas and importance of the concept of inalienable rights, the social contract or compact, the 27 grievances as stated in the Declaration of Independence, and the discussions of enumerated versus implied powers; and cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain how the protection of these rights were incorporated in the United States Constitution and the federal Bill of Rights as a fundamental purpose of government.

Essential Questions

  1. What events lead to the writing of the Declaration of Independence?

  2. What were the issues behind colonists’ protest?



  1. Economic issues 1.1

  • Effects of Mercantilism and salutary neglect

  • Impacts of the Acts of British Law from 1763-1774

  1. Political issues 2.2, 2.3

  • First Continental Congress

  • Patrick Henry – March 1775, James Otis, Thomas Paine – Common Sense, The Crisis, Jan. 1776

  • Second Continental Congress

  • Declaration of Independence: Reasons for separation, New theory of government, Unalienable Rights, Declaration of war





Chapter 2-Section 2

OSS

We the People 6
Chapter 2-Section 2
Activity: Mercantilism

Activities

  • Create or interpret Political Cartoons

  • Writing project – Letters from Colonies to Great Britain, journals, poem

  • Timeline to Independence

  • Annotation of the Declaration of Independence

  • Paraphrase the Declaration of Independence into modern terms

  • Read Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and identify key concepts, words, and/or phrases




  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources


First Quarter

August 19 – October 15

Topic: From Confederation to Constitution

Instructional Time:

3 Days

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

2.2 Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize the impact of major historic events of the Revolutionary Era and major documents contributing to the formation of constitutional government in the United states including the Mayflower Compact (1620), the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut (1639), the English Bills of Rights (1689), the Albany Plan of Union (1754), the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776), the Articles of Confederation (1781), and the colonial/revolutionary writings of Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, and James Otis.
2.4 Evaluate the necessity for a written constitution to set forth the organization or government and to distribute powers among the three different branches of government and the states, or the people.


Essential Questions

  1. What were the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation?

  2. How was the government organized under the Articles of Confederation?

  1. Governmental structure under the Articles of Confederation 2.2

  • Powers of Congress

  • States rights

2. Success of the Articles of Confederation

  • Land Ordinance of 1785

  • Northwest Ordinance of 1787

3. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation 2.4

  • Lack of strong central government

  • Economic: Taxes, tariffs, commerce

  • Violation of personal and property rights: Shay’s Rebellion

  • Difficulty in adding amendments



Chapter 2-Section 3


OSS
We the People 8
Chapter 2-Section 3

We the People 8

Activities

  • Draw a township using the criteria created by the Land Ordinance of 1785.

  • Cause and effect graphic organizer

  • Predict what America might be like today if still under the Articles of Confederation

  • Connection of the UN and EU as modern confederations

  • Write a news report over Shays’ Rebellion (who, what, when, where, why)

  • Conduct a mock interview of Daniel Shays

  • Research connections between issues of private property rights during the Shays’ Rebellion era vs. today, especially regarding modern issues of eminent domain.







First Quarter

August 19 – October 15

Topic: Writing the Constitution

Instructional Time:

5 Days

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

2.5 Analyze the events and major conflicts, beliefs, and arguments which led to the addition of the Bill of Rights to the United States Constitution; and compare the points of view as expressed in Federalist Papers Number 10 and Number 51 and the writings of the Anti-Federalists including Patrick Henry and George Mason.

Essential Questions

  1. On which issues did the Constitutional Convention delegates compromise to achieve ratification of the Constitution?

  1. Writing the new Constitution 2.5

  • Virginia Plan; New Jersey Plan

  • Compromises: Connecticut (Great), Three-fifths, Commerce and Slave Trade

  • Presidential Compromises: Single Executive, Elected to 4-year term by electoral college, Commander-in-chief

  1. Ratification 2.5

  • Federalists: responses to the weakness of the Articles of Confederation, Federalist Papers

  • Federalist No. 10

  • Federalist No. 51

  • Anti-Federalists: lack of Bill of Rights and fear of tyranny

  • Works from Cato, Brutus, and George Mason, Patrick Henry

  • Anti-Federalist Papers



Chapter 2-Section 4

We the People 9, 10
Historical Documents, Pgs. 791-796

Chapter 2-Section 5

We the People 11,12,13,14
Essential Federalist Papers

Essential Anti-Federalist Papers
Activity: Federalist and Anti-Federalist Views






  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources


Suggested Resources and Literacy Connection


  • Graphic organizer for compromises and Federalists/Anti-Federalists

  • Hold a Constitutional Convention to write a class constitution

  • Create and participate in a mock Constitutional Convention

  • Conduct a Constitutional search to find how the Constitution addresses the weaknesses on the Articles of Confederation.

  • Research political philosophers and write a quote consistent with their perspective. Present this to the class and the other groups will determine the principle that is being addressed.

  • Create a timeline of events effecting Constitutional influences

  • Research using the Internet and newspaper articles to find information that deals with Constitutional principles

  • Create political cartoons or editorials reflective of the development of Constitutional government

  • Debate from Federalist/Anti-Federalist differing points of view

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as used in Federalist and Anti-Federalist texts

  • U.S. History Series: The Early Republic: The Federalists pg 17+

  • The Federalist Debates: Balancing Power Between State and Federal Governments from EDSITEment

  • Federalist Documents: Free Federal Teaching Resources

  • Federalist Papers #10

  • Federalist Papers—Complete Collection

  • Anti-Federalist Papers—Complete Collection

  • See Supplement to this guide for additional resources for The Federalists.






Second Quarter

October 20 – December 19

Topic: The Constitution

Instructional Time:

16 Days

Cur. pgs. 13-16

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

1.1 Contrast the essential characteristics of limited versus unlimited governments with an understanding that the United States’ constitutional system established legal restraints on governmental power.

1.3 Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.
3.1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

3.2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3.4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments including tribal and local governments.

3.5. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize how power is separated as well as shared under the American system including the separation of powers and checks and balance, which is designed to prevent abuse of power by any government body at the local, state, tribal, and federal levels.



  1. Six basic principles of the Constitution 1.1 1.3

2. Challenges to federalism over time 3.1, 3.2, 3.4

  • Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions

  • McCulloch v. Maryland - 1819

  • Ordinance of Nullification – South Carolina, 1832

  • Rise of sectionalism

  • Current challenges to federalism 3.5

  • Tribal relationships and responsibilities 3.5

  • Indian Country Media Network

  • Native American Times

3. Articles of the Confederation, Preamble to Article 7


Chapter 3-Section 1
Chapter 11-Section 4

OSS
Constitutional Principles Videos

  • Consent of the Governed

  • Separation of Powers

  • Rule of Law

  • Representative Government


Chapter 25-Section 1

Chapter 3






  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources



Second Quarter

October 20 – December 19

Topic: The Constitution

Instructional Time:

16 Days

Cur. pgs. 13-16

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

2.3. Determine the central ideas and importance of the concept of inalienable rights, the social contract or compact, the 27 grievances as stated in the Declaration of Independence, and the discussions of enumerated versus implied powers; and cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain how the protection of these rights were incorporated in the United States Constitution and the federal Bill of Rights as a fundamental purpose of the government.

2.6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.
5.3.A. Analyze the rights and liberties guaranteed to all citizens in and protected by the Bill of Rights, how they are applied and protected within the states through the 14th Amendment, and sustained through the actions of individual citizens.


Essential Questions

  1. The Constitution is based on which principles?

  2. How does the amendment process illustrate federalism?

  3. What is the difference between formal and informal amendments?

  4. How do the principles of the Constitution provide for a more effective or efficient government?

  5. Thinking back to the original Constitutional principles, would the founding fathers be surprised by the changes in their government over the last 200 years?

4. Formal Amendments/Formal Process 2.3, 2.6

  • Bill of Rights 1-10

  • Civil War 13,14,15

  • Suffrage 15,19,23,24,26

  • Presidential 12,20,22,23,25

  • Housekeeping 11,16,17,18,21,27

5. Informal Amendment Processes

6. Protection of rights 5.3A

  • Writ of Habeas Corpus

  • Bills of Attainder

  • Ex post facto laws

  • Writs of Assistance




Chapter 3-Section 2

Constitution
Chapter 3-Section 3
We the People 15

Chapter 20-Section 3 (pgs 576-578)





  • CH-S = Chapter-Section in Magruders American Government, KIT = Resources in Magruders Teacher’s Kit, WTP = We the People, OSS = Outside Sources




Foundation for the U.S. Bill of Rights

Writing or Group Activity: Comparing Excerpts from Two Documents

from the Magna Carta

from the English Bill of Rights

Directions:

Our Bill of Rights is based largely on earlier lists of rights, especially two sources from England: The Magna Carta (1215) and the English Bill of Rights (1689). As you read, picture what the English monarchs were able to do before these documents limited their power. Look for ideas that grew into our Bill of Rights, then answer the questions that follow.


Questions:

  1. What are three of the ways English monarchs could have treated people unfairly before King John signed the Magna Carta?




  1. Explain which protections in our Bill of Rights have roots in the listed selections from the Magna Carta, and which have roots in the listed selections from the English Bill of Rights.




1. We [the monarch] have granted that the English church shall be free, and shall hold its rights entire and its liberties uninjured. . . .
12. No tax shall be imposed in our kingdom except by the common council of our kingdom, except for ransoming of our body, for making of our oldest son a knight, and for once marrying our oldest daughter. . . .
20. A free man shall not be fined for a small offense, except in proportion to the measure of the offense; and for a great offense he shall be fined in proportion to the magnitude of the offense, and none of the fines shall be imposed except by the oaths of honest men of the neighborhood. . .
39. No free man shall be taken or imprisoned or dispossessed, or outlawed, or banished, or in any way destroyed except by the legal judgment of his peers or by the law of the land.
40. To no one will we sell, to no one will we deny, or delay right or justice.”

“That levying money [taxing] without grant of parliament . . . is illegal.
That it is the right of the subjects to petition the King. . . .
That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in parliament, ought not to be [challenged or questioned] in any court or place out of parliament.”



Suggested Resources and Literacy Connection




  • Bill of rights flip chart, mobile, model, scavenger hunt

  • Research current event articles and/or political cartoons which illustrate the 6 basic principles of the Constitution

  • Research current events which give examples of current attempts of the nullification of federal law (i.e. national healthcare, immigration, medical marijuana)

  • Using a natural disaster (i.e. Mississippi River flooding, Hurricane Katrina, May 3, 1999 tornado) identify the proper role of city, state, and national governments within the scope of “federalism”

  • If you were to propose an amendment to the Constitution, what would it be and why would you propose it?

  • Concept circle to illustrate the informal amendment process

  • Describe a scenario to illustrate a modern example of how the protections of writ of habeas corpus, bills of attainder, ex post facto laws, and writs of assistance are still important today

  • Chart whether specified topics are “state” or “federal” in scope

  • Tribal commonality of the 5 governments

  • Equal Rights Amendment

  • Balanced Budget Amendment

  • Flag Burning Amendment







Second Quarter

October 20 – December 19

Topic: Three Branches of Government--

Legislative

Instructional Time:

20 Days

Cur. pgs. 17-18

OC³ and Essential Questions

Topics/Content

Suggested Resources and Activities

1.3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.
4.2.A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

4.2.B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representations such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

2.3. Determine the central ideas and importance of the concept of inalienable rights, the social contract or compact, the 27 grievances as stated in the Declaration of Independence, and the discussions of enumerated versus implied powers; and cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain how the protection of these rights were incorporated in the United States Constitution and the federal Bill of Rights as a fundamental purpose of the government.

3.3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4.2C Describe the process in which public policy is formulated into law including both the constitutional and operational procedures utilized in the modern legislative process.

4.2F Apply the principles of limited government, federalism, checks and balances, and separation of powers to the workings of the three branches of government in real world situations including current issues and events.


Legislative 1.3

  1. Structure: Article I of the Constitution 4.2A, 4.2B

  • Organization of Congress

  • Strict versus liberal construction

2. Senate

  • Advice and consent on treaties

  • Confirm executive appointments

  • Conduct trials of impeachment

  • Filibuster and cloture

3. House of Representatives

  • Tax legislation

  • Votes on Articles of impeachment

  • Reapportionment 4.2B

  • Redistricting

  • Term limitations

4. Powers of Congress 2.3

  • Delegated powers: Article I, Section 8 –Expressed, Implied (Elastic, Necessary and Proper Clauses), Inherent

  • Prohibited Powers: Article I, Section 9

  • Reserved Powers: 10th Amendment 3.3

  1. How a Bill Becomes a Law 4.2C


  1. Congress Structure/Committees 4.2C

  • Current Events and Issues 4.2F


Chapter 10-Sections 1,2
Chapter 12-Section 1

Chapter 10-Sections 3,4

Chapter 10-Sections 2,4


Chapter 4-Section 1

Chapter 11


Chapter 12-Sections 3,4

Activity: How A Bill Becomes Law

Chapter 12-Sections 1,2


Download 303.54 Kb.

Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page