Asteroid Affirmative



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Gonzaga Debate Institute 2011

U.S.S. Reliant Asteroid Detection Aff

Asteroid Affirmative


Asteroid Affirmative 1

**Inherency** 19

Current Programs Fail 20

Current Programs Fail 21

Not Enough Funding 22

Not Enough Funding 23

Not Enough Funding 24

No Current Programs 25

**Asteroid Impact Advantage** 26

Asteroid Impact Inevitable/Likely 27

Asteroid Impact Inevitable/Likely 28

Asteroid Impact Inevitable/Likely 29

Asteroid Impact by 2036 30

Impact Outweighs - Magnitude > Probability 31

Impact Outweighs - Probability > Timeframe 32

Impact Outweighs - Probability 33

Impact Outweighs - Probability 35

Impact Outweighs Nuclear War 36

Small Asteroids = damage 37

Small Asteroids = damage 38

Small Asteroids = damage 39

Small Asteroids = damage 41

Small Asteroids = damage 42

Small Asteroids = damage 43

Huge Asteroid on the way 44

Huge Asteroids on the way 45

Asteroid Impact  Biological Destruction 46

Asteroid Impact  Ice Age 47

Asteroid Impact  Ice Age 48

Asteroid Impact  Miscalculation 50

Miscalculation - Likely 53

Miscalculation - Likely 54

Miscalculation – Timeframe 55

Asteroid ! – Miscalculation 56

Asteroid Impact – Nuclear War 57

Asteroid Impact  Wildfires 58

Wildfire ! – Poverty 59

Wildfire ! - deforestation 60

Asteroid ! – Global Communications 61

Asteroid Impact  Agriculture Disruption 62

Agriculture Disruption ! – Food Shortages 63

Food Shortage ! - War 64

Starvation ! = D Rule 65

Starvation ! = D Rule 67

Starvation ! = D Rule 68

Starvation ! = D Rule 69

Asteroid Impact  Supersonic Shockwave 70

Asteroid Impact  Extinction 71

Asteroid Impact  Tsunamis 73

Tsunamis ! - Economy 74

Tsunamis ! – Underwater Landslides 75

Asteroid Impact  Climate Change 76

Asteroid Impact  Climate Change 77

Asteroid Impact > Climate Change 78

Climate Change ! – Disease 79

Asteroid Impact – Laundry List 80

Asteroid Impact – Laundry List 81

Asteroid Impact – Laundry List 82

Asteroid Impact  Ozone Depletion/UV radiation 83

Asteroid Impact – Harms Ocean Life 84

UV-B Radiation  DNA damage 85

UV-B Radiation  Multiple Impacts 86

UV-B Radiation  Disease 87

Disease !  Extinction 88

Disease !  Extinction 89

UV-B Radiation ! – Plant Growth 89

UV-B Radiation ! – Ocean Biodiversity 91

Ocean Biodiversity ! – Economic Collapse 92

Biodiversity ! – Cultural Identity 93

Biodiveristy ! – Extinction 94

Biodiveristy ! – Extinction 95

Biodiveristy ! – Extinction 96

Exploding Asteroid  Kill Millions 97

Exploding Asteroid  Tsunamis 98

Ocean Impact More Likely 99

Ocean Impact More Likely 100



**Asteroid Mining** 101

Asteroid Detection  Mining 102

Asteroid Detection  Mining 103

Asteroid Detection  Mining 104

Asteroids = resources 105

Asteroid Mining = Profitable 106

Asteroid Mining = Good Idea 107

Asteroid Mining = Economically Feasible 108

Asteroid Mining = Safer & Cheaper 109

All Asteroids can be mined 110

We Have The Tech 111

Mining Solves Economy 112

Mining Solves Economy 113

Economy ! – War 114

Asteroid Mining – Platinum 115

Platinum k2 Oil Dependence 116



**Solvency** 117

Space Based Detection Key 118

Space Based Detection Key 119

Space Based Detection Key 120

Space Based Detection Key 121

Space Based Detection Key 122

Detection – Adaptive Membrane Telescopes 123

Detection – Adaptive Membrane Telescopes 125

Detection – Adaptive Membrane Telescopes - Feasible 126

Detection – Ground Based 127

Deflection – Tractor Beams 128

Deflection – Propulsion 129

Deflection – Asteroid Trapping 130

Deflection – Asteroid Trapping 131

Deflection – Laser Ablation 132

Deflection – B612 Spaceship 133

Deflection – Nuclear 134

Early Detection key 135

Early Detection key 136

Early Detection key 137

Early Detection key 138

Detection Key To Deflection 139

Detection Key To Deflection 140

Detection Key To Deflection 141

Detection Key To Deflection 142

Detection Key To Deflection 143

Plan Key Now 144

USFG Key 145

USFG Key 146

**Add-Ons** 147

Science diplomacy 148

Science diplomacy 149

Impact Extensions 150

Impact Extensions 151

**AFF Answers To** 152

AT U.N. CP 153

AT Privitization 154

AT Privitization 155

AT Privitization 156

AT Politics – Plan Popular 157

AT Politics – Plan Popular 158

AT Politics – Plan Popular with Public 159

AT Politics – Plan Popular 160

AT Poltics – Lobbying 161

AT Politics – NASA Lobbying 162

AT Politics – NASA Lobbying 163

AT Politics – Bi-partisan 164

AT Politics – Congress 165

AT: low probability 167

AT Nuclear Deflection Bad 168





1ac



Observation 1: Inherency
The only detection available for PHO’s are radar telescopes that can see a shallow distance from Earth’s surface. More power is needed.

Bucknam and Gold in 08 [Mark and Robert “Survival” (00396338); Oct/Nov2008, Vol. 50 Issue 5, p141-156, 16p PN] [PHO - potentially hazardous object]

Though radar telescopes, such as the giant 305m dish at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, enable rapid and accurate assessments of PHO size and orbit, they are only useful when the objects pass within a few million kilometres of Earth. NASA recommended against developing a radar specifically for finding and tracking PHOs, stating that ‘orbits determined from optical data alone will nearly match the accuracy of radar-improved orbits after one to two decades of observation’.15 Existing radar telescopes should be used as far as possible to refine predictions of Apophis’s trajectory – either confirming or ruling out the potential for an impact in 2036. In addition to fielding new Earth- and space-based sensors as suggested by NASA, former astronaut Rusty Schweickert called for placing a transponder on Apophis during a close approach in 2013 to help determine whether a 2036 collision is likely.16 This could save years of worrying, or give us extra years to prepare and act. Such a mission would cost on the order of a few hundred million dollars.


There is no funding for more detection telescopes-these are key to survey threatening NEOs

IRWIN I. SHAPIRO et al in 10,( Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Chair FAITH VILAS, MMT Observatory at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, Vice Chair MICHAEL A’HEARN, University of Maryland, College Park, Vice Chair ANDREW F. CHENG, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory FRANK CULBERTSON, JR., Orbital Sciences Corporation DAVID C. JEWITT, University of California, Los Angeles STEPHEN MACKWELL, Lunar and Planetary Institute H. JAY MELOSH, Purdue University JOSEPH H. ROTHENBERG, Universal Space Network, Committee to Review Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies Space Studies Board Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS, http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~planets/sstewart/reprints/other/4_NEOReportDefending%20Planet%20Earth%20Prepub%202010.pdf)

The second mandate, the George E. Brown, Jr. Near-Earth Object Survey section of the 2005 NASA Authorization Act, directed that NASA detect 90 percent of near-Earth objects 140 meters in diameter or greater by 2020. However, what the surveys actually focus on is not all NEOs, but the potentially hazardous NEOs. It is possible for an NEO to come close to Earth, but to never intersect Earth’s orbit and therefore not be potentially hazardous. The surveys are primarily interested in the potentially hazardous NEOs, and that is the population that is the focus of this chapter. Significant new equipment (i.e., ground-based and/or space-based telescopes) will be required to achieve the latter mandate. Neither the White House budgeted nor Congress approved new funding for NASA to achieve this goal, and little progress on reaching it has been made during the past 5 years.



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