Dancing Towards Respect Part One: Respect for Yourself Years 11-13 Level 6-8 Duration: 12-16 lessons



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Dancing Towards Respect

Part One: Respect for Yourself

Years 11-13

Level 6-8

Duration: 12-16 lessons (approximately)
This unit, written by Julie Cadzow, takes students on a movement journey towards respect for themselves. They will identify characteristics of selected emotions and explore ways to control their emotions through dance. They will compose movement sequences alone and with others, and will consider the idea of ‘balance’ as not only a still shape in dance but also as a sign of respect for themselves and something to be attained in their emotional lives.
RESPECT:

  • To treat with consideration

  • To treat with esteem, or high regard

  • To recognise

  • To honour

  • To look up to

In order for people to show respect towards others, it is necessary for them to have self-respect.

In order for people to be able to respect themselves, they need to be aware of their own emotions.
Emotions determine the quality of our lives. They occur in every relationship we care about – in the work place, in our friendships, in dealing with family members, and in our most intimate relationships. They can save our lives, but they can also cause real damage. They may lead us to act in ways that we think are realistic and appropriate, but our emotions can also lead us to act in ways that we regret terribly afterward.

Paul Ekman, (2003) Emotions Revealed. London: Phoenix

Included in this unit are two possibilities for NCEA assessment.

Many schools have multiple levels in their dance classes and for this reason the unit allows for all students to participate in every activity, with a specific NCEA assessment opportunity for Levels One Dance 1.1 (AS 90001), Part 1 and Level Two Dance 2.2 (AS 90294) at the end of the unit.

Level Three students could use this work to develop ideas for Dance 3.1 (AS 90594): Produce a Dance for Performance, or work together to produce a sequence to be performed for Dance 3.2 (AS 90595): Perform a Solo or Duet Dance Work to an Audience. (The achievement standards for these are not included).
Key Competency

Thinking and Managing Self

Students will critically reflect upon and analyse the way they respond to a variety of situations. They will consider different points of view and explore different ways to react to emotions such as anger and sadness. They will create movement and still shapes to represent selected emotions.


Key Words

Respect: To treat with consideration, to recognise, admire or honour

Emotion: A feeling and its distinctive thoughts, psychological and biological states and a range of propensities to act. (Daniel Goleman)

Motif

A repeated gesture or phrase that is developed in a variety of ways and is like a signature to a dance



Augmentation

A dance device where a motif is developed by making the movements larger in space or time



Embellishment

A dance device where a motif is developed by adding detail to a move, such as a hand gesture or an arm movement



Insertion

A dance device where a motif is developed by including new movement material into the motif (e.g. a roll)


Resources

Page 5: Emotions: Biological Reactions and facial expressions Photocopied to A3

Page 6: Worksheet 1: What does an emotion look like? One per student

Pages 9-11 Families of Emotions: Photocopied, cut, laminated (if desired) and organised into packs for groups of three or four students

Page 17: Worksheet 2: How we express our Emotions One per student

Pages 27-31: AS 1.1 Compose Movement Sequences ‘It’s About Balance’

Pages 32-35: AS 2.2 Choreograph a Solo Dance ‘It’s About Balance’

Pathway Cards: (Pages 36-41) Photocopied and laminated

Post Box question sheets (Pages 42-49)


Music Suggestions

A wide range of music is listed below. Select as appropriate for the students.



Chillout Sessions 10 Disc 1: Idlewild Blues: Outkast (12)

Chillout Sessions 10 Disc 2: Cowboys: Dusty Kid (14) - instrumental

Chillout Sessions 10 Disc 2: Karma Car: Brooka Shade (15) - instrumental
Deep Forest – Pacifique: La Legende Part 2 (2) Night Village (3), La Baiser (6), L’ile Invisible (8)

Electronomicon: Pitch Black – Reptile Room (1), Electric Earth Part 2 (3)

Moods: Ian Anderson – In a Stone Circle (4)

Oceania: Oceania – Kotahitanga (Union), 11

Te Vaka: Lakilua – Tutuki, 3

The Black Seeds – On the Sun Tuk Tuk (1), Shazzy Dub (8)

The Corrs – Erin Shore (instrumental), Moods 3

Watermark: Enya – River (9)

Waves: The Southern Drop – Dan Sperber & Luke Casey: ‘Relaxomatic’ (4)

Whale Rider: Lisa Gerrard – Biking Home (4)
Achievement Objectives

Level 6

Developing Practical Knowledge in Dance

Develop and demonstrate their dance skills in at least one selected dance genre/style and explore the use of a variety of dance technologies.



Developing Ideas in Dance

Select and use choreographic devices, structures, processes and technologies to develop and give form to dance ideas.



Communicating and Interpreting in Dance

Describe, explain and respond to the ways in which dance uses elements, devices, structures, the performers, and production technologies to communicate ideas, feelings and experiences.


Specific Learning Outcomes

Assessment opportunities are suggested throughout this unit.

Assess only those most appropriate for your students. It is not necessary to assess every Learning Outcome.

LO1: Students can identify selected emotions and situations in which these emotions may occur

LO2: Students can create group and solo still shapes based on emotions

LO3: Students can create movement along air and floor pathways to represent emotions

LO4: Students can develop a motif using the dance devices of augmentation and embellishment

LO5: Students can develop expression in their dancing by performing movement based on emotions, and reactions to emotions

LO6: Students can compose movement sequences based on balances and the idea of emotions

LO7: Students can participate in activities about self-respect


Suggested Learning Sequence

Activities One to Seven focus on emotions.

Many of the activities require group work. Although the aim is for students to begin to recognise and understand their own emotions it is also for them to feel safe and secure while participating in the activities. No student should be left to flounder alone, nor should ‘fingers be pointed’.
Emotions

Activity 1. What we do when…

All human beings experience similar biological reactions to certain emotions.

The causes of the emotions may differ from person to person and between cultures, but the biological reactions and the facial expressions are almost the same.

These reactions were thought to help protect early humans in the dangerous times in which they lived. The necessity for ‘flight or fight’ (the body instinctively preparing itself to either stay and defend itself or to run away) was crucial for survival. The way we live today is very different from those early times. In most parts of the world, the dangers are much reduced, but we still experience those same biological reactions.




  • Before showing the class the biological reactions chart, ask the students what they think their bodies ‘do’ when they are angry, afraid, disgusted, sad, happy and surprised.




  • Show them the chart and have them practise the facial expressions to match each emotion in front of mirrors (if possible).



  • Give each student the ‘What does an emotion look like?’ handout. They are to draw the facial expression on the head of a person experiencing the emotion indicated.



  • They then draw a body shape under the head to match the emotion. Students need to consider the overall body position. Will the body be in an open shape or a closed shape?

An open body shape could be more upright and strong, with the head held erect and the arms held away from the torso. A closed body shape could be hunched, bent or curled with the head lowered, and arms close to or across the chest/torso.






Emotions: Biological Reactions and Facial Expressions

Anger

  • A rush of hormones, such as adrenaline, provides energy for action.

  • The heart rate increases.

  • The blood flows to the hands (perhaps originally to prepare to strike or to enable an easy grasp of a weapon).

  • The eyebrows are pulled together and down and the eyes open wide so that the upper eyelids push against the eyebrows

  • Lips are tensed and pressed together

Fear

  • The body ‘freezes’ for a short moment so that the brain can determine whether to run away or stay and fight

  • Blood moves away from the face (which creates a feeling of ‘blood running cold’) and causes the skin to appear paler

  • Blood moves into the skeletal muscles so that the body is ready for action

  • The upper eyelids rise, the jaw drops and the lips pull back towards the ears.

Disgust

  • The nose wrinkles and the upper lip rises. (This was thought to be an attempt to close the nostrils to block out an unpleasant odour.)

  • When one corner of the mouth tightens and rises slightly, the expression could also be contempt.

Sadness

  • The metabolism slows and there is a corresponding drop in enthusiasm and energy. This reaction possibly kept early human beings close to their homes and away from danger

  • The mouth is open, corners of the lips drop and the eyes look downwards

Happiness

  • There is increased brain activity that inhibits or holds back negative thoughts. The lips curl up from the sides into a smile and the muscles around the eyes contract.

Surprise

  • The eyebrows rise. This is thought to have opened the eyes wider, allowing increased light onto the retina. Vision is clearer and more information is provided to tell the brain what was happening.




References:

Ekman, P. (2003). Emotions Revealed. London: Phoenix

Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam Books
Activity 2. Worksheet One: What does an emotion look like?

Use knowledge of your own emotions and the information from the ‘Emotions: Biological Reactions and facial expressions’ page to:



  • Draw/sketch a facial expression for each emotion

  • Draw/sketch a body shape to match each emotion



Anger Fear Disgust



Sadness Happiness Surprise



Activity 3. Emotions in Sculpture

Students organise themselves into groups of four. Working in pairs, they exchange their Activity 2 ’What does an emotion look like?’ worksheets with the other pair. Using the sketches, they select one. One student becomes the ‘clay’ ready to be moulded and the other student becomes the sculptor who tries to arrange the ‘clay’ into the exact body shape shown on the sketch.


Method: Invisible String

The ‘clay’ stands in a neutral position.

The sculptor taps with a finger a body part on the ‘clay’, which they pretend attaches an invisible string from the sculptor’s finger to that body part. The sculptor can then slowly ‘pull’ the string with the body part attached into the required position. Gradually the selected emotion will begin to appear from the ‘clay’. The facial features should be left until the rest of the body is in place.
When each of the lumps of ‘clay’ has been moulded into an emotion, the sculptors try to guess the emotion being expressed of the other pair.

The sculptors could also move around the other groups and guess the emotions.

Each emotion could also be photographed for analysis later.

The pairs then swap roles and repeat the exercise.


Activity 4. Emotions in Sculpture – group tableau

Working in groups of four as for Activity 3, they repeat the activity but one sculptor moulds the other three into one tableau. The sculptor will need to consider the positions of each of the pieces of clay and their relationship to each other.

How will each piece of clay be positioned?

Will they be in contact with each other?

Where will they each be focussed?

What body bases will they use?


Once the trio is in place, other sculptors come and try to read the emotion being expressed.

Photographs of each tableau should be taken at the completion of each tableau, to be analysed later.



Questions to be asked using the photographs:

What emotion can you see?

What information tells you this?

Where are they focussed?

What body shapes are they using?
Assessment Opportunity: LO2: Students can create group and solo still shapes based on emotions
Activity 5. Mirror an Emotion

Working in pairs (or threes as required), one student moves in slow motion into one of the six emotions explored so far (anger, fear, disgust, sadness, happiness and surprise). The partner mirrors the movements as accurately as possible, and then takes over leading into another emotion.


The students should:

  • Hold each emotion shape for eight seconds before the new leader begins the transition into the next emotion shape




  • Change levels during the transition between each emotion shape




  • Try not to talk

After some rehearsal, make groups of two pairs, and have one pair perform while the other watches and tries to identify the emotions being expressed. Discuss what they saw and then swap roles.


Assessment Opportunity:

LO2: Students can create group and solo still shapes based on emotions



Families of Emotions

There are many, many emotions. The six discussed so far have been chosen as ‘starters’. The next activities involve classifying emotions into groups or families and then attempting to identify them.



Activity 6. Families of Emotions

Organise students into groups of three or four and give each group a pack of the cards below. They are to organise the cards into families of similar emotions, with the emotions in capital letters as ‘heads’ of the families.





ANGER


SHAME


FEAR


SURPRISE


DISGUST

Annoyance




HAPPINESS

Dread



HOPE

Contempt



LOVE

Sorrow



SADNESS

Excitement





Hostility


Joy

Terror

Amazement


Scorn

Kindness

Dejection


Humiliation


Bliss

Regret

Astonishment


Guilt

Friendliness

Embarrassment


Expectation


Desire

Fury

Outrage

Nervousness

Anxiety

Revulsion

Distaste

Grief

Loneliness


Relief

Pride

Shock

Wonder

Trust

Affection

Longing





Answers: Families of Emotions



Emotions


ANGER

Annoyance


Hostility


Fury

Outrage



FEAR

Dread

Terror

Nervousness


Anxiety



DISGUST

Contempt

Scorn

Revulsion


Distaste



HAPPINESS

Joy

Bliss

Relief

Pride



HOPE

Excitement


Expectation


Desire

Longing



LOVE

Kindness

Friendliness

Trust

Affection



SADNESS

Sorrow

Dejection

Grief

Loneliness



SHAME

Humiliation


Regret

Guilt

Embarrassment




SURPRISE

Amazement


Astonishment


Shock

Wonder




Activity 7. The Pathway of an Emotion
Copy and laminate (if possible) the six pathway cards on pages 36-41

Show the students one of the cards.


Questions:

  • Describe this pathway

  • If you were moving along a pathway like this, what might you be feeling?

  • How do you know?

  • What movements could you be using?

  • How fast would you be travelling?

  • What could be a reason for you to be feeling this way?

  • What is going to happen when you arrive at the end of the pathway?

Repeat with the other cards.


Explore travelling across the dance space following each of the pathways.
Explore creating each of the pathways in the air using different body parts.

What types of movements could we use when we are: angry; sad; happy; in love; surprised or embarrassed?


Work in pairs or groups and explore movements that could be associated with each of the above emotions.
Working alone or in pairs, the students are to select any two emotions, two floor pathways (or one floor pathway and one air pathway) and two different locomotor or non-locomotor movements related to their selected emotions.
Compose a short movement sequence combining the pathways and locomotor/non-locomotor movements.
Rehearse and perform for another pair.
Questions:

What did you see?

What emotions were being expressed?

How did you know?


Assessment Opportunity:

LO3: Students can create movement along air and floor pathways to represent emotions


Activity 8. Identifying an Emotion
Using the cards from Activity Six - Families of Emotions and a roll of masking tape:


  • Each student selects one card and keeps it hidden from the other students




  • They then use masking tape to stick the card on the back of one of their class members, without telling them what the emotion written on the card is.




  • Student must identify the emotion card on their back by:

    • Moving around the room to some lively music. They could use different types of locomotor movement as suggested by the teacher or improvised by the students.




    • The teacher stops the music and students pair up with the nearest person next to them.




    • They read the cards on each other’s backs without verbalising them.




    • Again without verbalising, the students take turns to perform a likely pathway and movements associated with the emotion written on their partner’s back, as explored in the previous activity (The Pathway of an Emotion)







    • After four or five times stop the game. Each student should now have had at least four different interpretations of their unknown emotion and have performed at least four possible pathways and movements associated with those emotions.




    • Ask the students to guess what their emotion is and take their card off to check.




    • Questions: Did you guess your ‘emotion’ or guess one in the same ‘family’? What movements and facial expressions did the people who helped you use? What pathways did they use?

    • Express the emotion your way

Organise the students to sit down and think alone. None of these questions have to be answered verbally.
Using the emotion card that was stuck on your back, think of a time when you were feeling that emotion.

Think about the situation you were in at the time.

What made you feel the emotion?

What action did you take?

Was this an appropriate or inappropriate way to react?


    • Make up a sixteen-count movement sequence as follows:

      • Counts 1-4 A still shape to represent your emotion

      • Counts 5-8 Four steps along a pathway that describes your emotion and uses relevant locomotor movement

      • Counts 9-12 Locomotor or non-locomotor movement to represent the situation that caused the emotion

      • Counts 13-16 A still shape to represent your reaction to your emotion




    • In pairs or in groups of three, the students rehearse their sequences together – each performing their own sixteen-count sequence but with other performers. (In this way, students who are not yet confident solo performers will still be performing their own choreography but the audience’s attention will not just be upon them.)

The pairs or groups should consider the positioning of their still shapes, where they each travel and how their movements may relate to the others, to provide the most interest for an audience.



    • Questions for the audience:

What did you see?

What emotions were expressed?

How did you know?

Describe their opening still shape?

What was the most memorable moment?

This activity can be repeated using different emotion cards and with students choreographing their sixteen-count sequences in pairs.


HANDLING OUR EMOTIONS WITH SUCCESS
The next activities demonstrate some ways in which we can begin to have more control over how we express our emotions.
Activity 9. How we express our emotions

Worksheet Two


Ask the students to complete Worksheet Two by themselves. Assure them that no one else will read what they write unless invited to by them to do so. The goal is for the students to write truthful answers and to think clearly about how they reacted to an emotional situation.

Assessment Opportunity (if appropriate for the class):

LO1: Students can identify selected emotions and situations in which these emotions may occur.




A situation that made me become very:

My reactions/what I did

The consequences of my reactions

What I might need to change about my reactions if it happens again

A situation that made me become very: Angry











A situation that made me become very: Anxious/worried











A situation that made me become very: Sad











A situation that made me become very: Embarrassed









Worksheet Two: How We Express Our Emotions

Activity 10. Handling Our Emotions
We don’t have much control over what we become emotional about, but it is possible, though not easy, to make some changes in what triggers our emotions and how we behave when we are emotional.

Paul Ekman Emotions Revealed



Anger

Anger is never without a reason, but seldom a good one.

Benjamin Franklin


Reframing a situation more positively is one of the most potent ways to put anger to rest.

Diane Tice


Brooding fuels anger’s flames. Seeing things differently douses those flames.

Daniel Goleman


Class discussion 1: Strategies to deal with anger

What can you do when you know you are in a situation where you are going to become very angry with someone?

Here are some possible suggestions. Discuss the effectiveness or value of each one.


  • Tell yourself to STOP!

  • Concentrate on staying calm

    • Take a deep breath

    • Think about something happy that occurred today

    • Think about something good about the person

    • Feel your pulse

  • Think about why you are angry

    • What actually happened?

    • Was it your fault?

    • Is your reaction fair?

    • Did the person intend to do what they did?

    • Does someone need to apologise?

    • If you apologised would you feel better?

  • Distract yourself

    • Break eye contact with the person

    • Look at the ground

    • Turn on an angle to the person

    • Walk away

  • Try and think about the situation from the other person’s point of view

  • Try and explain how you feel and why

  • Leave the situation

  • Go back and discuss it later with the person when you next see them

What are some other possible solutions?

Now look back to Worksheet Two. Add to the last column some of the suggestions discussed that may be useful for you.


Class Discussion 2: Strategies to use when anxious or worried

What can you do when you know you are in a situation where you are going to become anxious or worried about something?


Here are some possible suggestions. Discuss the effectiveness or value of each one.

  • Relax

    • Breathe slowly

    • Flex the muscles in different parts of your body and then relax them. Flex and relax your face, neck, shoulders, arms, hands, fingers, chest, buttocks, legs, feet, toes

    • Lie down and listen to some relaxing music

  • Think about why you are anxious/worried

    • Will the event really occur?

    • Is it useful to keep on worrying?

    • What can I do to make the situation easier?

    • What can someone else do to make the situation easier?

    • Make a list of steps to take

  • Think about something else – a distraction

    • Watch a DVD

    • Ring a friend

    • Do some exercise

    • Read a book

What are some other possible solutions?


Now look back to Worksheet Two. Add to the last column some of the suggestions discussed that may be useful for you.
Sadness and Embarrassment
Discuss in small groups some tactics for dealing with embarrassment and sadness.

Share your ideas with the whole class and add any that you think may be useful to Worksheet Two.


Activity 11. Dancing about an Emotional Situation

This activity uses the dance devices of augmentation and embellishment and the dance elements of time and energy.


Motif = A repeated gesture or phrase that is developed by the use of dance devices and is like a signature to a dance.

Augmentation = A dance device where a motif is made larger in space or time

Embellishment = A dance device where detail is added to a motif, such as a hand gesture or an arm movement

Quality = a way of using energy in a dance, for example percussive, vibratory, collapsing

Tempo = the speed of the movement in dance or of the underlying beat in music
If the students have not yet explored the devices, take the class through some simple exercises:
Augmentation

  • Perform a simple wave action. This becomes a motif.

  • Wave to the person next to you

  • Wave with your other arm

  • Wave with one arm and then the other arm, quickly and then in slow motion

  • Begin waving one hand on a low level and keep waving as you rise slowly to tip toe

  • Begin your wave as far to the right as you can reach and continue it with your left hand as far to the left as you can reach

  • Wave frantically as if you are trying to gain someone’s attention, beginning on a low level and finishing on a high level

Embellishment

  • Wave with both hands at the same time

  • Add a wiri as you wave

  • Change the air pathway of your wave from side to side to a zigzag to the floor

  • Use your foot to wave at the same time as your hand


Note also: Abstract movement = Movement to represent an action – not mime
Organise the students into pairs, or groups of three or four.
Situation 1: You are very angry because your sister read some private messages on your cell phone

Situations 2: You are embarrassed because you were laughed at in class

Situation 3: You are very worried about an essay you have to write

Situation 4: You are very sad about a friendship that has broken up
Task:

  • The students select a situation from the choices above, or they may make up their own ones




  • Create a group tableau to represent the emotion

  • Create a short mime sequence to describe the situation that caused the emotion

  • Create an abstract movement phrase for the situation:

    • Select three important actions from the mime sequence

    • Augment or embellish each action. Be as imaginative as possible.

    • Accent (or perform with more strength) a movement from each action

    • Perform each action using a different amount of ‘weight’ (heavy, weak, light, firm)

    • Change the quality of each action – explore the words: explosive, collapse, sharp, vibratory (as if a person is sobbing)

    • Link each action with transitions that use movements and pathways that relate to the situation

  • Mime a short sequence that describes a helpful tactic for dealing with the emotion

  • Create an abstract movement phrase for the tactic by:

    • Selecting three important actions from the mime sequence and augmenting or embellishing them

    • Linking each action with transitions that use movements and pathways that relate to the situation

  • Complete the dance with a tableau of how you may feel after ‘dealing’ with the situation in a successful way.

Think about: Focus, Formations and Feelings

Rehearse the dance and perform for the class.


Questions for the audience:

What did you see?

What did the dancers do?

Describe what happened in the dance?

What movements did they use to communicate the idea?

How did they communicate their tactic?

How do you think they felt after ‘dealing’ with their situation?

Could they have done anything else?

What was most effective and why?

Assessment opportunity:

LO4: Students can develop a motif using the dance devices of augmentation and embellishment

LO5: Students can develop expression in their dancing by performing movement based on emotions, and reactions to emotions
Activity 12. Respect

One meaning of respect is ‘to treat with consideration’.

The following activity can be organised as a general class discussion, a small-group discussion or a ‘Post Box’ activity as explained below.

Questions:

What does respect mean to you?

Does everyone deserve respect? Why/why not?

What is self-respect?

Is self-respect important? Why/why not?

In what ways would a person with little self-respect treat him or herself?

How does a person develop self-respect?

How might a person behave who has no self-respect?

In what ways would a person with little self-respect treat other people?
Post Box – Respect

Equipment: Eight question sheets, many small pieces of paper and eight containers


The questions in the box above have been written on single A4 sheets of paper.

(See Pages 41-49)


Photocopy and place them around the room.
Give each student eight small pieces of paper. Allow ten minutes for the students to move around the room, answering each of the questions on separate pieces of paper and placing their responses into the appropriate containers.
When everyone has answered each question, divide the class into eight groups and give each group one of the response containers. The groups read their allocated responses and summarise the answers given by the class members.
Hold a report-back session for each summary, with discussion as appropriate.
Assessment Opportunity (if appropriate for the class):

LO7: Students can participate in activities about self-respect


Activity 13. It’s About Balance
The goal is balance, not emotional suppression: Every feeling has its value and significance.

Daniel Goleman


Balance and Dance

Students working individually:



  1. Explore balances with a body base of:

  • Two feet

    • Leaning as far forward as possible

    • Leaning as far back as possible

    • Leaning to one side

    • Legs bent, legs straight

    • On toes

    • On heels

    • On outside or inside of feet

  • One foot (arabesques)

    • Lifted leg to the back, side, front, crossed in front, bent and straight

    • Grounded leg straight, bent

    • Spine twisted

    • Interesting arm positions

    • Focus on different body parts, on the floor, out into general space, to the ceiling

  • One foot and one hand

  • One knee and one foot

  • One knee

  • One knee and one hand

  • Bottom

b) What other possibilities are there?




  1. Explore holding one balanced position, moving slowly off balance, suspending the position until the last possible second, before ‘falling’ smoothly while changing the body base into a new balance.

For example, begin in an arabesque, tilt backwards into a balance on one foot and one knee, lean to one side, extending the front leg high to one side and tilt carefully onto the buttocks, and roll around onto the knees.

Improvise a short sequence of four balances with four different body bases accompanied by some slow music.

Repeat the sequence with some faster music – ensuring that the balances and falls are controlled at all times


  1. Using a motif

Create an interesting shape you can hold for eight counts. Call this your motif.

Tilt off balance for eight counts; use the momentum to travel in a light run across the floor for eight counts and take eight counts to reform into the motif.

Repeat with different off balance tilts, travelling directions and locomotor movements.

Music, light drumming or the shaking of a tambourine could accompany this activity.




  1. Now imagine your motif is your ‘neutral’ emotion – one where you are calm and controlled.

  • Think of a situation where you became angry and create a shape that you can move into from your neutral one that represents this. What does the shape look like? Should it be angular or smooth? What arm positions will you choose? Where is your focus?

  • Next, imagine the tilting is your way of changing from a calm state into an angry state. ‘Grow’ into your ‘angry’ shape.

  • Change the tempo and weight: Travel very quickly along a straight pathway using strong and angular movements as if you are very angry and then slow down and make your movements softer, as if you are using a tactic to control your anger.

  • Change the accent: Repeat the above, but accentuate at least two movements to help communicate the idea of anger.

  • Gradually ‘grow’ back into your neutral shape (motif) – calm and controlled.

  • Repeat with situations where you became happy, sad, embarrassed and anxious, using a different pathway for each one.

  • Repeat in the 32-count pattern as for Activity d)




  1. Work with a partner. Perform as you did for Activity e) but now accommodate another person. Begin close together and explore moving away and returning as you perform the movements associated with each emotion.

  • Try to make the different emotion shapes as clear as possible

  • Try connecting your emotion shapes with your partner’s.


Assessment opportunity:

LO4: Students can develop a motif using the dance devices of augmentation and embellishment

LO5: Students can develop expression in their dancing by performing movement based on emotions, and reactions to emotions

LO6: Students can compose movement sequences based on balances and the idea of emotions



Assessment

All of the Learning Outcomes have been included in this assessment sheet. It is not necessary to assess every Learning Outcome. Use only the ones that are most relevant for your students.





Respect for Yourself Name: _________________


Learning Outcome

Working towards

Achieved

Achieved with Merit

Achieved with Excellence

LO1: The student can identify selected emotions and situations in which these emotions may occur













LO2: The student can create group and solo still shapes based on emotions














LO3: The student can create movement along air and floor pathways to represent emotions













LO4: The student can develop a motif using the dance devices of augmentation and embellishment













LO5: The student can develop expression in his or her dancing by performing movement based on emotions, and reactions to emotions













LO6: The student can compose movement sequences based on balances and the idea of emotions














LO7: The student can participate in activities about self-respect













Comment:



NCEA Assessment Opportunities
There are two opportunities for achievement standards to be gained. Select as appropriate for the level of the students.
Achievement Standards
Level 1 Dance 1.1: AS90001 Compose Movement Sequences

(Part One only. Part Two and Part Three can be achieved in Units Two and Three of this resource.)


Level 2 Dance 2.2: AS90294 Choreograph a Solo Dance

DANCE 1.1 Compose Movement Sequences Number AS90001, Version 4


Dancing Towards Respect Part 1 “It’s About Balance

(Written by Julie Cadzow and Patrice O’Brien)
Teacher Guidelines:
Context/setting:

This assessment resource has been written to assess learning gained from Part One of Dancing Towards Respect – ‘Respect for Yourself’.


Conditions:

This assessment resource has been written for students to compose a solo dance in an ABA structure, but it could be adapted for a duet.



Resource requirements:


  1. The teacher will need a set of cards that have an emotion written on them. To enable students to demonstrate their learning from the unit it is important that all the emotions are positive ones, e.g. happiness, love, pride etc. (See Page 12 of ‘Respect for Yourself’)

  2. Appropriate music provided by the teacher from which the students can choose accompaniment.

  3. Authenticity sheets for students to sign as verification that the composition is their own work if the teacher has not observed the process.

  4. A video camera to record work for formative feedback and moderation purposes.


Additional information:

It is important that students do not know ahead of time that the movement sequence for Section A will be manipulated to make Section B. This knowledge can constrain their movement selection and make the process of composing contrasting movements more difficult. Therefore all instructions should be given orally until step 5 where the students begin to refine and rehearse their dances. Then the instructions sheet can be used as a check.

It could make the process of composing Section B more accessible for students if they begin composing by just turning Section A into the opposite emotion. Once they have experimented with this, introduce ideas about tempo, quality, accent, weight and size of movement. Reinforce that the order of the movements cannot be changed.

Judgments should be made holistically on the weight of evidence provided by the student. For example, if most aspects of the choreography are fulfilled and produce a dance that looks interesting and imaginative, the lack of an imaginative balance at the end should not affect the result. However, the intent of the brief as described in the boxed section of the student instructions must have been achieved.

It’s About Balance’


Student Instructions Sheet
This is one of three opportunities you will have this year to compose a movement sequence to gain AS 90001. This sequence is a solo sequence that will be danced by you.
To achieve excellence in this standard you must select and combine movements in original and imaginative ways to make a dance sequence about controlling emotions.
Although this achievement standard is assessing your choreography, you will need to perform your sequence well so that your choreography looks effective. The movements need to be clear and precise, showing that your sequence is rehearsed and not improvised.
You will be given some time in class to develop your sequence. You may also wish to work on it in your own time. It must be at least 45 seconds long, but it is recommended that you aim for 1 minute.
No costume is required for the performance of the sequence but appropriate clothing should be worn. You will be given a choice of music or you may perform without music.
Your sequences will be assessed within normal class time in the dance room with front facing away from the mirrors. The performances will be videoed for moderation.
The Brief
You are to compose a solo sequence that is at least 45 seconds long, which uses an ABA structure and contrasts in the time and energy of the movements, to show two opposite emotions.
Your sequence should also:

  • Finish both Section ‘A’s in a controlled and imaginative balance

  • Use tilt, suspension, falling off-balance and momentum to represent a change in the emotion shown in Section A – Transition 1

  • Use changes in tempo, accent, weight and quality to contrast the Section A emotion from the Section B emotion

  • Include a short abstract movement phrase to represent a way of dealing with an emotion – Transition 2

Steps in the Process


  1. Your teacher will give you a card that has an emotion written on it. You are to compose a phrase or short sequence of movement (about 15 seconds in length) that shows the emotion.

Finish this phrase in an interesting balance shape that represents the emotion.

This is Section A of your composition.




  1. You will then repeat the movement from your A section, but by changing the time and energy of the movement, you will create a new phrase/sequence of movement that shows the opposite emotion. For example, if you were given happiness on your card you will now be changing your composition to be about sadness. Pride could become embarrassment, and friendliness could become hostility. Finish the phrase in a still shape that represents the emotion you have been expressing.

This is Section B of your composition.


  1. The next step is to create a transition between Section A and Section B. The movement in this transition represents something that has happened to change the emotional state shown in Section A to the contrasting emotion shown in Section B. From the balance shape performed at the end of Section A, use tilt, suspension, falling-off-balance, and momentum to show this.




  1. Another transition is needed between Section B and Section A. To create this transition phrase you will move from the still shape at the end of Section B to show a tactic or diversion that can help to change from the emotional state in Section B back to the emotional state shown in Section A. To do this you will first mime the movement and then abstract that movement into a dance phrase.




  1. You can now put together, refine and rehearse your dance ready for assessment. It has the following structure:

  • Section A – Movement that shows an emotion, finishing in a balanced shape

  • Transition 1 – A catalyst that changes the emotion

  • Section B – Section A repeated with time and energy changes and finishing in a still shape, to show a contrasting emotion

  • Transition 2 – Abstract movement that shows a tactic to reverse the emotion

  • Section A – The original phrase, finishing in a balanced shape

Assessment Schedule: Dance 1.1 AS90001 ‘It’s About Balance’

Evidence

Achievement

Achievement with Merit

Achievement with Excellence

The students present an original composed solo movement sequence, which is appropriate to the brief and is at least 45 seconds long.

Clearly demonstrates contrasting emotions using an ABA structure with transitions between sections.

The sequence shows appropriate use of:



  • An asymmetrical balanced shape at the end of each Section A.

E.g. A body base of one foot with one arm raised above the shoulder

  • Transition 1: Tilt, suspension, off-balance and momentum.

E.g. A tilt forwards with minimal suspension into a short run

  • Variations in time and energy

E.g. If the emotions are happiness and sadness, Section B is performed slower and the movements are weaker and less defined

  • Transition 2: Mime and abstract movement

E.g. A still shape from Section B, followed by small arm movements to mime the turning of a page in a book, followed by a large arm movement swinging from one side of the body to the other



Clearly demonstrates contrasting emotions using an ABA structure with transitions between sections in an interesting movement sequence composition.
The sequence shows deliberate and effective use of:

  • A clearly asymmetrical balanced shape at the end of each Section A.

E.g. A body base of one foot with the torso leaning towards one side, and purposeful use of other body parts in the shape

  • Transition 1: Tilt, suspension, off-balance and momentum.

E.g. A tilt to one side or backwards, with an extension of the body shape during the suspension, flowing into a movement involving a different body base and arm gestures

  • Variations in time and energy

E.g. If the emotions are happiness and sadness, Section B is performed slower and heavier, with more than one accented movement and a collapse to the floor

  • Transition 2: Mime and abstract movement

E.g. A still shape from Section B, followed by a change in facings, small arm and head movements to mime the turning of a page in a book, followed by a turn into a dynamic leap


Clearly demonstrates contrasting emotions using an ABA structure with transitions between sections in an imaginative movement sequence composition.
The sequence shows skilful and perceptive use of:

  • A strongly asymmetrical balanced shape at the end of each Section A.

E.g. A body base other than the feet, with purposeful use of the torso and other body parts in the shape

  • Transition 1: Tilt, suspension, off-balance and momentum.

E.g. The torso initiates a tilt to one side, with a purposeful extension of the body shape during the suspension, flowing into a turn, fall, roll or slide

  • Variations in time and energy

E.g. If the emotions are happiness and sadness, Section B is performed with a decreasing tempo, heavily accented movements, a vibratory movement (perhaps to represent sobbing) and a collapse to the floor

  • Transition 2: Mime and abstract movement

E.g. A still shape from Section B, followed by a movement initiated by the torso to flow into a change of levels, performing small arm and head movements to mime the turning of a page in a book, followed by an imaginative roll




DANCE 2.2 Choreograph a Solo Dance


Number AS90294, Version 2

It’s About Balance’



Student Brief

You are to compose a 1-minute solo sequence in an ABCA structure, based upon work completed during the ‘Respect for Yourself’ dance unit.

Your sequence will show a contrast from balance to off-balance and back to balance, which will represent times when you are calm and in control of your emotions, times when you are not and the regaining of that balance.
Section A: A short sequence, including a balance and a movement phrase or gesture, to represent yourself when you are calm and in control of your emotions. This is a motif.

Section B: Use the dance devices of augmentation and insertion to develop the motif from Section A to represent a change of emotions. You must move from balance to off-balance, a moment of suspension and include movement along a pathway that clearly communicates the new emotion.

Section C: Use the dance devices of embellishment and insertion to develop the motif from Section A to represent a method you could use to control your new emotional state, such as a diversion or tactic. Include movement that clearly communicates the idea of the diversion or tactic and shows a regaining of balance.

Section A: A repeat of the opening of the sequence, finishing in a balance.


Your sequence must:

  • Be at least 1 minute long

  • Be in an ABCA structure

  • Use the dance devices of augmentation, insertion and embellishment to develop a motif

  • Travel along a clear pathway using movements related to an emotion

  • Include a movement phrase to represent a diversion or tactic to employ when controlling your emotions.

  • Use balanced and off-balance movements

  • Begin and end in a controlled and imaginative balance


You must also complete the Choreographic Intent worksheet (Page 34). This must be handed to your teacher prior to your assessment.

Vocabulary
Motif

A repeated gesture or phrase that is developed in a variety of ways and is like a signature to a dance



Augmentation

A dance device where a motif is developed by making the movements larger in space or time



Embellishment

A dance device where a motif is developed by adding detail to a move, such as a hand gesture or an arm movement



Insertion

A dance device where a motif is developed by including new movement material into the motif (e.g. a roll)



Diversion/tactic

A activity to use to control your emotions, such as going for a walk, calling a friend, relaxation exercises or reading a book



Suspension

Moments in time where you are off-balance before gaining balance, such as the top of a roller coaster, before it travels down the track



The assessment will be on ______________ in Room _________

Your sequence will be videoed to confirm assessment judgements.
The music will be ____________ or you may perform in silence.
You must wear clothing that is suitable for dance.

You may choose a costume or clothing appropriate for your idea if you wish.


DANCE 2.2 Choreograph a Solo Dance Number AS90294, Version 2

It’s About Balance’





Choreographic Intent Name ___________________
My balanced shape The pathway I chose




I chose the balance shape to represent me when I am feeling calm because:

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
A description of my motif:

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


I developed the motif by:

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


I chose the pathway because:

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


The 'tactic' I chose to 'control' my emotions and a description of how I represented this:

_______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

My final balance How I feel about my choreography




DANCE 2.2 Choreograph a Solo Dance


Number AS90294, Version 2


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