Uepc proposal form



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UEPC PROPOSAL FORM



  1. School of Liberal Arts, Department of Kinesiology, Course number 122, Advanced Strength and Conditioning




  1. Prerequisites: BIO 13/14: Human Anatomy, KINES 110: Exercise Physiology




  1. This is an advanced course, which requires students to apply content from anatomy, physiology, exercise physiology, biomechanics, and nutrition with high-level concepts of human physical fitness development.

C Course Objectives: This course examines the advanced methods

and techniques associated with the design of strength and conditioning programs to enhance human performance in sport and fitness. Emphasis will be placed on proper form and utilization of various workout designs to complement larger training goals.  Students will gain experience in the theoretical and practical aspects of designing individual and group workout sessions, periodization, and programming to enhance progression. Students will use an evidence-based approach to critically analyze current research to develop and justify conditioning programs and techniques for a broad range of sports and activities.



  1. Justification for this course:

Many of the Health and Human Performance (HHP) majors in the Kinesiology Department pursue jobs in the health and fitness industry. Currently there is a void in the curriculum of courses that prepare students to take the certification exams necessary to work in these fields. The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) is a well-respected and internationally recognized organization that offers two certifications: (1)Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and (2) NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer (NSCA-CPT). This course will not only prepare students to take these certification exams, but will qualify the HHP program under the NSCA guidelines as an accredited academic institution of higher education in strength and conditioning.

A. Expected Learning Outcomes (Should these mirror those on the course syllabus? The syllabus lists 11 LOs, while there are 19 listed here…)



  • Students will critically analyze functional movement patterns and apply appropriate corrective strategies in an extensive written analysis.

  • Students will physically employ corrective strategies prescribed by their classmate for a period of 4 weeks.

  • Students will demonstrate and explain appropriate biomechanics in strength and conditioning techniques.

  • Students will critically analyze current concepts in stretching and verbally defend their stance on the topic.

  • Students will demonstrate the importance of evidenced-based practice through the written analysis of current peer reviewed journals in strength and conditioning.

  • Students will observe and evaluate professionals in strength and conditioning settings and will provide a written critical analysis of their role in their respective professions.

  • Students will demonstrate professional and ethical behavior during their on-site observations.

  • Students will demonstrate ethical and respectful behavior toward their peers during laboratory and classroom activities.

  • Determine appropriate strength testing techniques in the evaluation of athletic performance.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of strength, agility, balance, coordination, speed, power, and flexibility in sport and conditioning performance.

  • Define the most effective types of flexibility training and prescribe stretches for each major muscle group.

  • Teach proper resistance training exercise and spotting techniques.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of pre-season, in-season, and post-season strength and conditioning training in sports.

  • Develop a sport-specific resistance training program that includes training frequency, load, exercise type, and progression

  • Design a safe and effective plyometric training program that incorporates proper equipment and the correct execution of exercises.

  • Design and implement speed, agility, and speed-endurance training programs to maximize physical performance.

  • Develop a sport-specific aerobic endurance training program based on training status, sport season, and recovery requirements.

  • Describe the importance of periodization to strength and conditioning programs.

  • Discuss the specific components of planning and designing a strength and conditioning facility including the development of policies and procedures, and facility maintenance and risk management.



B. This evidenced-based course fits in with the college mission of

searching for the most valid and current research. The goal is to discourage students to continue to follow the authoritarian or traditional approach where techniques and concepts are passed down and followed without question. The students will be analyzing and critiquing techniques and concepts currently in use and determining their validity. A student-centered approach will also be incorporated into this course making the students participants in their own learning process. Perhaps this section could be expanded upon? It seems like this course also fits with the College’s mission of valuing and understanding the whole person.

c. Student evaluation:


In this course students will critically analyze functional movements in their classmates and develop a comprehensive program with corrective strategies to optimize functional daily movement and athletic performance. After implementation of these corrective strategies they will analyze and critique the effectiveness of their program design.
Students will search and analyze current literature on stretching and verbally defend their stance on the topic.
Students will design a fitness facility and specify the clientele, equipment, building specifications, health and safety components, and liability prevention.
Students will apply course concepts to design a strength-training program for a specific individual with regards to their health status, goals, and access to equipment.
Students will observe and evaluate local strength and conditioning professionals and will provide a written critical analysis of their role in their respective professions.
Students will review current peer-reviewed literature and provide a written analysis of the topics of their choice related to the field of strength and conditioning.
Students will demonstrate and explain the proper mechanics used in performance testing and weight lifting.
Pass/fail grading will not be an option in this course.


  1. Student Population:

This is an upper division course to be completed during the student’s junior or senior year. This course is designed for the Health and Human Performance majors in the Kinesiology Department. A solid understanding of human structure and function are essential to the concepts of this course. Students must complete human anatomy and exercise physiology before entering this course. An idea class size would be 20 students. Is this a class that health science student may enroll in?


  1. Relationship to present College curriculum:

This uses the foundation of information students obtain in anatomy, exercise physiology, biomechanics and nutrition and allows students to apply this information in advanced concepts. Students have found this course complements Kines 119: Therapeutic Exercise and Physical Therapy Modalities providing an in depth understanding of how to apply strength and conditioning principles to individuals returning to sport or activity after an injury or surgery.


  1. Any extraordinary implementation costs:

There are no additional special equipment or space needs.



  1. Library Resources: Pending

Review of Library Resources

New Course Proposal in Kinesiology: Advanced Strength and Conditioning
For the 2013-2014 budget year, the Kinesiology materials allocation was $10,962, an increase of 42% over last year’s budget. The increase is in part due to the across the board increase to the library’s budget, but also because of the increase in Kinesiology enrollment, increase of library instructions sessions and reference service usage of students in the department, and increased circulation by Kinesiology faculty and students. This amount is used to purchase new monographs in the all of the areas of Kinesiology taught at Saint Mary’s College for the undergraduate and graduate majors, as well as students taking Kinesiology courses as electives. With the increase, the department and librarian have much more freedom to enhance areas of the collection that may be lacking and focus on new areas of study, including advanced strength and conditioning.
The following is a sample of book titles selected from the current collection that are related to the stated topics of interest to the course:

  • Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning / Baechler & Earle, eds. (2008)

  • Strength Training Anatomy / Delavier (2006)

  • Sports Injuries Guidebook / Gotlin, ed. (2008)

  • NCSA’s Guide to Sport and Exercise Nutrition / Campbell & Spano, eds (2011)

Many Library of Congress Subject headings are assigned to the area of strength and condition. The following are a few represented in our catalog and the numbers of material is each:



  • Physical Education and Training (74)

  • Sports Medicine (57)

  • Muscle Strength (12)

  • Physical Fitness (105)

  • Exercise Physiology (22)

  • Athletic Performance (4)

  • Exercise Therapy (5)

Overall, the collection reflecting topics of strength and conditioning are adequate and timely. Though, a particular gap in our current collection is practical and clinical manuals (noticed particularly in the area of performance and therapy). While we have a sampling of these types of material, it has not been a focus in collecting and must be purchased in the future out of the allocated kinesiology budget.


Many existing online periodical literature databases will provide support for this course, including Physical Education Index, an index of periodicals related to topics ranging from physical education to sports medicine, and PubMed and Nursing and Allied Health Source.

In addition to these area-specific resources, students and faculty researching strength and conditioning can also benefit from our subscriptions to databases in other disciplines, such as Psychology (PsycInfo / PsycArticles), and other databases more related to scientific and medical topics (SpringerLink and Wiley Interscience, two premier science periodical literature collections). Web of Knowledge, a database incorporating Arts & Humanities, Science, and Social Sciences Citation Indexes, is also a useful, high-end resource.


Should this course consist of a research assignment, the Kinesiology librarian will be available to work with the instructor and offer any need information literacy instruction, in a full guest lecture, shorter hands-on workshop, or online tutorial.

Respectfully submitted,


Sarah Vital

Reference and Instruction Librarian

October 15, 2013


  1. Course credit and grading options:

This is a 1.0 credit course. 3.10 hours per week are spent in the classroom with a lecture/discussion format, and 2 hours per week are spent in the lab.


  1. Prerequisites: BIO 13/14: Human Anatomy and KINES 110: Exercise Physiology



  1. Course description (for College catalog):

This course examines the advanced methods and techniques associated with the design of strength and conditioning programs to enhance human performance in sport and fitness. Emphasis will be placed on proper form and utilization of various workout designs to complement larger training goals.  Students will gain experience in the theoretical and practical aspects of designing individual and group workout sessions, periodization, and programming to enhance progression. 


  1. Course content: Syllabus with Course Calendar

Department of Kinesiology

KINES 122 - Advanced Strength and Conditioning


9:40 – 11:10 TTH Instructor: Megan Toma

1.00 CREDIT Office: Saint Joseph Hall

Telephone: 631-4932

Email: mtoma@stmarys-ca.edu

Course requirements: Human Anatomy, Exercise Physiology
I. Course Description: This course will provide the student with an advanced understanding of the principles and methods necessary to design comprehensive strength and conditioning programs that enhance fitness and athletic performance. Students will use an evidence-based approach to critically analyze current research to develop and justify conditioning programs and techniques for a broad range of sports and activities. This course will also prepare the student for certifications in personal training and strength and conditioning.

II. Course Introduction: Welcome to Foundations of Advanced Strength

and Conditioning! I am pleased to have you

in the course and I intend to provide a student-centered approach where you will be engaged in your own learning process. Please come to class ready to listen, ask questions and participate in lab activities. I want you to have a great learning experience, so please bring any questions or concerns to my attention.


III. Required text: Essentials of Strength and Training and

Conditioning. Baechle, T. 2008

Testing will consist of two quizzes, two midterms, and a final exam. Students will also complete a take-home practice exam for the CSCS certification. There will be NO make-up exams unless prior arrangements are made with the instructor.
IV. Requirements: Two typed journal reviews will be required. In addition, the student will fulfill 6 hours of observation with a CSCS certified strength and conditioning

coach or a NSCA Certified-personal fitness

trainer and turn in a three-page typed observation paper.

Regular attendance is considered mandatory and more than 3 absences will result in a grade reduction. Students are responsible for supplementary reading.


Cell Phones: All cell phones are to be put away during class time.
Course Communication: Students should check their Saint Mary’s email and the course Moodle site on a regular basis for course communication.

Grading policy for late work: All course assignments must be completed on the due date. Work submitted after the due date will result in a 10% point loss of the possible points.


V. Grading Grading will be broken down as follows:

3 major written exams 100pts/ea

2 quizzes 30pts/ea

Dynamic stretching 20 pts/ea

2 journal reviews 30pts/ea

1 observation paper 50pts/ea

Program design 45pts

Facility Design 30 points

Homework assignments 5 pts/ea

CSCS practice exam 40 points


Grade scale: letter grades will be assigned according to the following percentiles.

A = 95-100 A- = 90-94.9 B+ = 85-89.5 B = 80-84.9

B- = 75-79.9 C+ = 70-74.9 C = 65-69.9 C- = 60-64.9

D+ = 57-59.9
VI. Educational Opportunities Because of the interactive nature of this course,

a variety of instructional methodologies will be used including:



  1. lecture

  1. labs

  1. group activities

  1. video tapes

  1. slides

  1. guest speaker(s)

  2. Power point

VII. Learning outcomes: At the successful completion of this course the student should be able to:



  • Determine appropriate strength testing techniques in the evaluation of athletic performance.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of strength, agility, balance, coordination, speed, power, and flexibility in sport and conditioning performance.

  • Define the most effective types of flexibility training and prescribe stretches for each major muscle group.

  • Teach proper resistance training exercise and spotting techniques.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of pre-season, in-season, and post-season strength and conditioning training in sports.

  • Develop a sport-specific resistance training program that includes training frequency, load, exercise type, and progression

  • Design a safe and effective plyometric training program that incorporates proper equipment and the correct execution of exercises.

  • Design and implement speed, agility, and speed-endurance training programs to maximize physical performance.

  • Develop a sport-specific aerobic endurance training program based on training status, sport season, and recovery requirements.

  • Describe the importance of periodization to strength and conditioning programs.

  • Discuss the specific components of planning and designing a strength and conditioning facility including the development of policies and procedures, and facility maintenance and risk management.

VIII. Grading Criteria (how grades are determined for assignments):

Abstracts (30pts): Each student will collect two professional journal articles on course related topics in strength and conditioning. The student will write a thorough review making sure to include all of the important points the authors are trying to convey. Also include at least three positive and three negative aspects of the article. Finish your paper with your opinion, personal experience or suggestions on how the article could be improved. Please attach a copy of the original article to the abstract. Due dates are listed on the attached schedule. Abstracts are graded according to content, grammar and spelling. Please be aware that magazine and newspaper articles will not be accepted.

Listed below are a few of the peer reviewed journals available in the library:



  • Journal of Athletic Training

  • The Physician and Sports medicine

  • American Journal of Sports Medicine

  • Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

  • Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

  • National Strength and Conditioning Journal

  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  • Physical Therapy

Each abstract is worth a total of 30 points. The points are broken down as follows:

1. Format: typed, minimum of two pages, journal info. With the journal name, date, article title and authors name on top of paper – use AMA citing: 5 points

2. Abstract is a thorough review, including all relevant points: 15 points

3. Grammar and spelling: 5 points

4. Copy of original article: 2 points

5. Last paragraph of personal opinion: 3 points

Link to some of the kinesiology journals: http://library.stmarys-ca.edu/subjects/physed/periodicals.html

AMA citing:

Authors last name, first initial. Title of article. Journal Name. Date;volume #, (Issue #)

Marrs, H. Study Strategy Predictors of Performance in Introductory Psychology. J Instr Pshchol. 2009;36(2)

Clinical experience - Each student will complete 6 observation hours shadowing a local strength and conditioning coaches or certified personal trainers. Upon completion of these hours the student will then submit a typed, three page minimum paper detailing their experience. A detailed description of this assignment will be available on Moodle.


Program Design project - Each student will design a periodized strength and conditioning program for a specific sport, and specific player position. The rationale for this program will need to be supported with current literature. The students will present this project to the class and will receive a grade for the paper and a peer grade for the presentation.
LABORATORY ACTIVITES: Students must dress appropriately for all labs and be prepared to participate in lab activities. Students must demonstrate and evaluate proper techniques and will practice instructing various skills with classmates.
Accommodations:

Reasonable and appropriate accommodations, that take into account the context of the course and its essential elements, for individuals with qualifying disabilities, are extended through the office of Student Disability Services. Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the Student Disability Services Coordinator at (925) 631-4164 to set up a confidential appointment to discuss accommodation guidelines and available services. Additional information regarding the services available may be found at the following address on the Saint Mary’s website: http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/academics/academic-advising-and-achievement/student-disability-services.html



Academic Honor Code

Saint Mary’s College expects every member of its community to promote and abide by ethical standards, both in conduct and exercise of responsibility towards other members of the community. Academic Honesty must be demonstrated at all times to maintain the integrity of scholarship and the reputation of the College. Academic dishonesty is a serious violation of College policy because, among other things, it undermines the bonds of trust and honesty between members of the community and

betrays those who may eventually depend upon the College’s academic integrity and knowledge. As an expression of support for academic integrity throughout the Saint Mary’s learning community and as an administrative tool to discourage academic dishonesty, Saint Mary’s has implemented an Academic Honor Code. The Academic Honor Code has been approved by the ASSMC Student Body, the

Faculty Academic Senate, the Provost and the President of Saint Mary’s College.


Kines 122 Course Calendar - Spring 2013

Students are responsible for completing the assigned reading prior to class and are expected to actively participate in class.

**These are approximate dates


DATE TOPIC READINGS

02/12/13 Introduction, Functional Movement Screen

02/14/13 Functional Movement Screen

02/19/13 Chapt 1 & 2 review/Basic Concepts of training theory

02/21/13 Quiz #1/Chapter 3 & 4 review

02/26/13 Adaptations to Anaerobic Training Programs

02/28/13 Adaptations to Aerobic Endurance Training

03/05/13 Exam #1

03/07/13 Principles of test selection and administration

03/12/13 Administration, scoring and interpretation of selected tests

03/14/13 Warm-up and Stretching – group discussion- journal review due

03/19/13 Resistance training and spotting/ Quiz #2

03/21/13 Resistance training continued

03/23/13-4/01/13 SPRING BREAK

04/02/13 Plyometrics

04/04/13 Speed and Agility

04/09/13 Exam #2

04/11/13 Aerobic Exercise Prescription

04/16/13 Developing Resistance Training Programs /periodization

04/18/13 Developing Resistance Training for Sport Teams

04/23/13 Training Intensity/ Observation paper due

04/25/13 CSCS practice exam

04/30/13 Strength Training for Seniors

05/02/13 Strength Training for Young Athletes

05/07/13 Olympic Lifting

05/09/13 Facility Design and Risk management

05/14/13 Injury Prevention

05/16/13 Review



05/21/13 Final Exam

  1. Review of experimental offering:

The change as a result of the experimental offering is a change of the course text.




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