Wood Products Business Media Contacts



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Weyerhaeuser

2016 NAHB International Builders’ Show - Booth C5031



Media Kit



Wood Products Business Media Contacts:


  • ELP – Carolyn Atkinson (253) 924-3696 carolyn.atkinson@weyerhaeuser.com

  • OSB – Jeremy Mauck (253) 924-2907 jeremy.mauck@weyerhaeuser.com

  • Distribution – Amy Warren (253) 924-3130 amy.warren@weyerhaeuser.com



Contributed Content and Press Releases:
January 2015

February 2015


  • Accommodate Heavy Snow Loads With the Right Roofing Panel

  • 9 Common Subfloor Mistakes – and How to Avoid Them

March 2015

  • In Depth: Lumber and Structural Panels

  • Weyerhaeuser Distribution Ramps Up Sales Team at Richmond Location

  • Product Spotlight: TimberStrand® LSL – What Can It Do For You

  • How to Manage Moisture for Stable, Beautiful Hardwood Floors

April 2015

  • Weyerhaeuser Distribution Centers Continue to Expand Product Brands and Selection

  • 4 Common Sales Mistakes Dealers Should Avoid

May 2015

  • TJ-Pro® Rating – A Conversion For Every Homeowner

  • A Day in the Life of a Software Support Specialist

June 2015

  • In Depth: Roofing

  • 7 Tips for Compelling Deck Displays

  • Weyerhaeuser Distribution Adds Sheathing Products from Ox Engineered to Houston Location

  • Weyerhaeuser’s Grayling, Mich., OSB Mill Earns Top Safety Award from APA

  • New Technologies, Smarter Driving Key to Managing Rising Fuel Costs

  • The Built-Up Column Conundrum

July 2015

  • Structural Solutions for Open Floor Plans

  • Beyond Code: Floor Framing Strategies for Satisfied Homeowners

  • Weyerhaeuser Distribution Offering Woodtone Exterior Tim Products in Denver

  • How to Boost Framing Efficiencies, Reduce Callbacks with TimberStrand LSL

August 2015

  • Weyerhaeuser Distribution Adds Fortress Railing Products in Three Markets

  • Components of a Backyard Oasis

  • Product Spotlight: Parallam PSL

  • Led By Multifamily, Housing Market Continues Cautiously Optimistic Pace

  • Modern Barn Houses Showcases Efficiency, Daylight and the Indoor-Outdoor Connection

  • 4 Strategies to Reduce jobsite Framing Waste

  • Energy-Efficient Homes Call for Subfloor Upgrades

September 2015

  • Sound Performance of Residential Trus Joist® Floor Systems

  • Beautiful Tile Starts Below the Surface

  • Weyerhaeuser Enhances Steller Dealer Operations Software

October 2015

  • Supporting Exercise Equipment with TJI® Joists

  • Proper Storage and Handling of Edge™ and Edge Gold™

  • Weyerhaeuser Distribution Adds Gossen PURE-Eco Millwork, Decking

November 2015

  • High-Performance Hardwood Flooring Starts Beneath the Surface

  • Simple Steps to Ensure Safety of Existing Decks

  • 6 Common Railing Mistakes – and How to Avoid Them

  • How to Control Moisture During and After Framing

December 2015

  • Specification of Metal Connectors with Parallam® Plus

Media Contact: OSB – Jeremy Mauck (253) 924-2907 jeremy.mauck@weyerhaeuser.com

Upgrading to 7/8″ OSB Provides Floor-Performance Benefits for Energy-Efficient Homes



Posted on woodbycom.com/blog January 2015

Contributed article for Building-products.com September 2015
When it comes to selecting a thickness of OSB panels for floors, walls and roofs, most builders follow the building code.

But savvy dealers know that, for certain conditions, a small bump in thickness can help customers construct more comfortable, durable homes.

Here are two applications where panel upgrades can make a significant impact on performance.

 

Energy-Efficient Floor Systems


For decades, 23/32” has been the most commonly used thickness of OSB subflooring. But a simple switch to 7/8” panels offers several advantages for accommodating a home’s energy efficiency and for ensuring the performance of finish materials and the overall feel of the floor. 

As an increasing number of builders move HVAC ductwork into conditioned space to improve energy efficiency (either as a competitive advantage or to meet energy code requirements), the prevalence of wider on-center joist spacing’s has also grown. 


Wider spacing, however, may lead to noticeable movement underfoot. Upgrading to 7/8” OSB subfloor can help ensure performance of finished floors such as tile and hardwood while also contributing to a more stable feel. The thicker OSB also offers at least 20% improvement in nail retention.
Although 23/32” panels are span-rated for floor systems spaced at 24” o.c., the National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA) suggests a thicker subfloor is necessary to reduce deflection of the subfloor and minimize pops and squeaks in the wood flooring. NWFA recommends a 7/8” panel for joists at 24” o.c. 
Similarly, tile requires sufficient stiffness. APA–The Engineered Wood Association’s publication “Technical Topics: Ceramic Tile Over Wood Structural Panel Floors,” provides guidelines for two-layer wood residential tile assemblies; a single layer of 7/8” OSB satisfies the recommended capacity for those two-layer wood assemblies across typical joist on-center spacing. 
Further, compared to a 23/32” panel, 7/8” OSB is more than twice as stiff and produces less than half the expected subfloor curvature between joists, which can help prevent tile and grout cracking.

Even for resilient and carpet floors, a thicker subfloor will feel more solid underfoot, while providing additional sound dampening for multifamily applications and reducing potential damage from drywall carts during construction.

 

Roofing Under Heavy Snow Loads


In most areas of the country, 7/16”- to 15/32”-thick OSB panels are sufficient for meeting code requirements for roof systems. However, in cold climates, going above code can help increase the performance and life span of the roof system.
Snow and ice accumulation put downward force on a building’s roof, and catastrophic failures happen when the load exceeds the weight it was designed to carry. Upgrading to 5/8” OSB panels, as part of a properly installed roofing system, can help handle the weight of the winter elements. The panels are thicker for added bending strength and are denser than commodity sheathing; in addition, panels with tongue-and-groove edges provide for more efficient distribution of heavy loads. 
Both panel upgrade options provide the same functionality as traditional code-compliant panels, so the change for contractors is minimal. In return, builders are crafting structures more likely to satisfy homeowners, with more comfortable steps underfoot and greater peace of mind overhead. 
About Jody Dedmon

Jody Dedmon has spent more than 25 years with Weyerhaeuser, 17 of them within the OSB division. In his current role as Market Development Manager, Jody applies in-depth knowledge of OSB manufacturing, installation practices, and market trends; leads a team of OSB Market Development Representatives; conducts training throughout the channel; and lends his extensive expertise to new product development and implementation.


Media Contact: OSB – Jeremy Mauck (253) 924-2907 jeremy.mauck@weyerhaeuser.com

Accommodate Heavy Snow Loads with the Right Roofing Panel
Federal Way, Wash., Feb 2, 2015 – Winter weather can take a toll on residential roof systems. Snow and ice accumulation put downward force on the roof, and if the load exceeds the weight it was designed to carry, catastrophic failures can occur.
One way to ensure roofs can stand up to hefty snow loads is to choose structural wood panels, such as 5/8″ Edge Gold Roofing, that can shoulder the additional weight. As part of a properly installed roofing system, Edge Gold Roofing is thicker for added bending strength in climates with heavy snow loads, and is denser than commodity sheathing for superior performance. Using the proven Edge Gold formula of its flooring relatives, it also provides superior wet weather properties.
Along with these features for winter weather climates, Edge Gold Roofing is also engineered flat and to stay flat; resists cupping, warping, and sagging; and includes fastener guides pre-printed on the surface. The panels are Structural 1 certified by APA.
“Beyond just performance, there are also practical reasons to switch to an enhanced roofing product,” said Fred Miller, OSB Market Development Rep for Weyerhaeuser in the New England region. “Through our research we’ve found that builders are increasingly interested in process reducing products (such as Edge Gold Roofing) because they add value by removing a step or two from the building process.”
“What’s more, the tongue-and-groove edges not only offer more efficient distribution of heavy loads, they also eliminate the need for the use of H clips, which can be time consuming to apply,” Miller continued. “The T&G profile on our panels fit together easier than anything else on the market, resulting in a perfectly gapped panel.”
For a limited time, first-time customers using Edge Gold Roofing can receive a rebate of up to $1.25 back per panel. (Click here for more information.)
The product is currently available only in select Northeastern markets. For more information on this or any other Weyerhaeuser OSB product, please contact Lou Bradner at lou.bradner@weyerhaeuser.com.
About Weyerhaeuser

Weyerhaeuser Company, one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands, began operations in 1900. We own or control nearly 7 million acres of timberlands, primarily in the U.S., and manage additional timberlands under long-term licenses in Canada. We manage these timberlands on a sustainable basis in compliance with internationally recognized forestry standards. We are also one of the largest manufacturers of wood and cellulose fibers products. Our company is a real estate investment trust. In 2014, our continuing operations generated $7.4 billion in sales and employed approximately 12,800 people who serve customers worldwide. We are listed on the Dow Jones World Sustainability Index. Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol WY. Learn more at www.weyerhaeuser.com.


Media Contact: OSB – Jeremy Mauck (253) 924-2907 jeremy.mauck@weyerhaeuser.com
9 Common Subfloor Mistakes – and How to Avoid Them
Federal Way, Wash., Feb 17, 2015 – A beautiful floor starts with a stable subfloor. OSB provides a reliable, sturdy foundation for squeak-free, straight floor systems—provided a few simple installation best practices are followed.

Here are nine common subfloor installation mistakes and how to prevent them:

1. Improper spacing.
To avoid buckling, subfloor panels should be spaced with a 1/8-inch gap at all edges and ends to provide room for naturally occurring expansion. Tongue-and-groove edges on many premium floor panels, such as Weyerhaeuser’s Edge Gold® OSB panels, are designed to self-gap.

2. Using green joists.


Wet lumber may lead to dimensional changes as the joists dry, resulting in nail pops and floor squeaks. Use Trus Joist® TJI® joists or kiln-dried, performance-tested lumber, such as Weyerhaeuser Framer Series® lumber, which is more dimensionally stable than green lumber.

3. Not letting a subfloor dry.


Always store floor panels under cover. OSB exposed during construction must be allowed to dry (especially before installing sensitive finish materials such as hardwood flooring). Edge Gold includes patented Down Pore® grooves that help shed standing water and a proprietary edge seal to reduce edge swell.

4. Improper nailing.


To avoid nail pops, pullouts, and shiners (nails that barely hit the joist), all of which can cause squeaks, use the correct nail size and spacing, and ensure the nails penetrate the floor joists and sink fully. Generally, nails (6d ring or screw shank, or 8d common) should be spaced 6 inches on center along supported panel edges and 12 inches on center on the panels’ interior supports, or as specified on the construction drawings. Many manufacturers print a fastener template directly on the panel face. For panels thicker than 1 inch, 10d nails should be used.

5. Forgoing glue.


A glue-nailed construction technique is optimal for ensuring a flat, stable floor. Use a solvent-based glue that meets ASTM D3498 performance standards; in cases where latex subfloor glue is required, careful selection is necessary due to the wide range of performance between brands.

6. Improper glue application.


Apply glue per manufacturer’s specifications. Be sure the joists are dry and free of dirt before applying. Many manufacturers recommend applying a continuous ¼-inch-diameter glue bead to framing members and using a serpentine pattern for supports that are 3½ inches or wider. Apply two beads of glue to panel joint locations; a 1/8-inch glue bead applied at the tongue-and-groove joints can further improve floor performance.

7. Letting glue dry.


If the glue develops a skin, it will lose some of its strength or may not bond at all. Apply only enough glue for one or two panels at a time, and completely fasten each panel before the glue is set. Check manufacturer specs for setting times, and keep in mind that warm weather can accelerate those times.

8. Hammering edges.


Using a sledgehammer to force a tongue and groove joint together tightly can crush the wood fibers, damaging both the panel hit as well as the one it is forced into. Further, it can close up the necessary gap on panel edges, leading to improper spacing issues mentioned above. Some premium panels, such as Edge Gold, are designed to fit together easily. If additional force is needed, always use a block of wood against the groove edge to minimize damage to the panel, and always allow a 1/8-inch gap between panels.

9. Forgetting to check your work.


Prior to finished floor installation, walk the subfloor to check for squeaks, missing fasteners, improper nailing, etc.

Simple strategies such as these can help provide flooring systems that are sturdy, stable, and squeak-free. For more detailed instructions and for tips on how to repair squeaky floors, download “Prevention and Repair of Floor Squeaks” here.



About Jody Dedmon

Jody Dedmon has spent more than 25 years with Weyerhaeuser, 17 of them within the OSB division. In his current role as Market Development Manager, Jody applies in-depth knowledge of OSB manufacturing, installation practices, and market trends; leads a team of OSB Market Development Representatives; conducts training throughout the channel; and lends his extensive expertise to new product development and implementation.


Media Contact: OSB – Jeremy Mauck (253) 924-2907 jeremy.mauck@weyerhaeuser.com

In Depth: Lumber and Structural Panels



This article originally appeared in LBM Journal – March 2015

Byline: Craig A. Shutt
New product sources and enhanced features are expanding the options for builders as they seek low-cost solutions that help make them more efficient.

LUMBER AND STRUCTURAL PANELS
RigidCoat plywood underlayment from Roseburg Forest Products features a water repellent coating over the top surface that blocks up to 40% of moisture absorption during construction. It comes with tongue-and-groove edges and is said to offer superior stiffness and strength. Produced from Douglas Fir and western species, it resists splitting, puncturing and impact damage.

This year’s combination of strong supply, rising market and interest among customers in improving efficiency will lead them to review product options and make some changes, manufacturers say. Some of those changes may come in the basic lumber products they use, as the choices and services expand and improve.

Supply won’t be a problem, they agree, especially with more options coming into the market. “The biggest trend we’re seeing is more supply of softwood being offered to the U.S. market,” says Geoff Berwick, director of risk management at Sherwood Lumber Corp. That results from the falling exchange rate with the Euro and Swedish Krona and to a lesser extent a lower cost for logs. “Sweden plans to increase shipments, and Central European sawmills are aggressively looking for commitments from U.S. buyers.”

These options, including Scots pine and Norway spruce, will offer alternatives for appearance-grade lumber. “The interest in these species is clearly there if the pricing and capacity are there—and they are reaching that point now,” Berwick says. “European producers are seeking diversity and a foothold in the improving U.S. market.”

Other factors also are boosting supply, says Steve Killgore, vice president of sales and marketing at Roseburg Forest Products. “The low currency exchange and China dropping back on its purchases has allowed Canada to ship more product into the U.S.”

Transportation issues that created bottlenecks last year also have cleared up, but challenges remain. “There is plenty of capacity to handle the anticipated supply, but transportation will continue to be an issue,” says Richard Mills, general lumber sales and marketing manager at Boise Cascade. “The ability to get the products to the market once they’re produced is first and foremost on everyone’s mind this year.”

Those challenges have lessened since last year, Killgore notes. “Rail companies did learn a lesson from the problems experienced last year, and new equipment is available in some places. The drop in oil prices has taken some of the pressure off of rail, so there’s more capacity available to ship. There are short-term problems, but they do have to be resolved.”

“The good part about last year’s problems is that the market demonstrated an ability to absorb consumption that was available without any major downward drag on pricing once rail equipment freed up,” Sherwood’s Berwick adds. Dealers also are carrying more inventory as business picks up, giving them more flexibility.



Builders’ Budgets Tighten
Builders will be looking for new options as their budgets tighten, says Neal Shunk, strategic marketing manager for lumber at Weyerhaeuser. “Builders have been catching up with the market and have consumed a large share of their land inventory,” he explains. “Now they need more, and land costs have been going up again. As a result, they’re paying more for their property, and they’re looking to suppliers and dealers to provide lower-cost solutions.”

That will be apparent in OSB sales in particular, notes Jody Dedmon, OSB market development manager with Weyerhaeuser. “The biggest trend for OSB products has been a move to enhanced products,” he says. “Part of that results from concerns over the labor shortage. We can’t build 25% more homes with the current labor supply, even if demand was there. Builders are looking for products that install quicker, with fewer callbacks or that take steps out of the process.”

That is leading to builders switching to products like enhanced subflooring that doesn’t require edge sanding, sidewall sheathing that doesn’t need house wrap, and roof sheathing that doesn’t need felt under the shingles, he notes. “Builders are willing to pay more upfront to reduce some of the process and allow them to frame quicker.”

Radiant-barrier sheathing also is growing in popularity due to its benefits in keeping the attic cooler, a significant factor in the south, Dedmon notes. “It’s definitely growing in use there, and we’re seeing its use extend further north all the time.”

Demand also is increasing for larger sizes of OSB, says Jeff Key, senior manager of marketing communications at Georgia-Pacific. “There has been more demand for 9- and 10-foot OSB lengths, due to the higher ceilings being put into homes more often. Longer length panels typically result in fewer seams, which aids in preventing air infiltration. We’re keeping an eye on that trend especially as the longer lengths become more popular. We’re also seeing different roof sheathing thicknesses, depending on the region or roofing materials used.”

OSB sales have faltered in recent months, according to statistics from Forest Economic Advisors LLC. Demand dropped slightly, from 18.417 billion square feet in 2012 to 18.369 billion square feet in 2014. “A big culprit in that decline was residential improvements, which the data we use from Census shows a 15% drop in 2014,” says Greg Lewis, vice president for wood panels with FEA. “We have trouble reconciling that with what we’ve heard from producers and some other data we’ve seen. Nevertheless, that’s the main reason for the drop off.”

Manufacturers don’t anticipate that trend will continue. “As housing starts rise, OSB demand will grow, as more of it goes into houses,” Roseburg’s Killgore says. “We expect the rise in that share will go to OSB, and it will continue to grow.”

Codes Cause Changes
Builders are making changes to meet code demands more energy efficient. Not all builders have yet resolved how they’ll meet those prescriptive needs. “We’re keeping a close eye on which products are preferred as builders adapt to changes in the building codes,” Georgia- Pacific’s Key says. “Many builders are focused on making homes tighter and more energy efficient, and we want to understand how that will affect the lumber and structural panels they are using. Their goal is to prevent air leakage to aid energy efficiency, and there are many ways they can achieve that.”

The changes are focusing some builders on adapting advanced-framing techniques, which in turn require longer lengths of lumber. “More builders are using a 24-inch on-center flooring or wall design,” Weyerhaeuser’s Dedmon says. “It allows them to stack studs on the joists to get more insulation into the cavity. The 24-inch on-center joist spacing also gives the HVAC trades more room to run ducts through the floor system, relocating the ducts from the unconditioned attic to the conditioned floor cavity to meet new energy codes.”

But some builders don’t realize that hardwood flooring installed over 24-inch on-center spacing requires a 7/8-inch subflooring to meet the National Wood Flooring Association and APA standards (rather than 3/4 inch or 23/32), he warns. “If they don’t upgrade, they’re not within the national guidelines. As they recognize this, it’s going to create a move toward 7/8-inch subflooring.”

Fire-resistant lumber is growing in interest, too, especially for multifamily builders. “There’s a lot of interest buzzing around it,” Sherwood’s Berwick says. “It costs more due to the premium for the coatings, of course, but it also offers more value. On top of offering more value, it inhibits mold and moisture, so coastal areas in particular are using it. Builders are selling it as an upgrade, and it’s being chosen more often.”

“Fire resistance is a growing interest,” Boise Cascade’s Mills agrees. “We’re taking it seriously and looking for alternatives that can meet the builders’ needs in a cost-effective manner.”

New products aren’t always the obvious approach, Roseburg’s Killgore points out. “We’re looking closely at how codes want builders to deal with fire. There are lots of solutions out there, but we believe the answer is more about technique than creating a new premium product. Using drywall may be the best answer in terms of efficiency and cost. The goal is always to find the low-cost solution, whatever format that takes. We’re optimistic that we can provide that.”



Service Remains Critical
Service remains a key requirement with these commodity products, but the definition of that term often differs between customers. “Service is a must-have when selling these products,” Georgia-Pacific’s Key says. “That essentially means being a comfortable fit for what the builder requires. Typically, that translates to on-time shipping, responsiveness to special needs and fast turnaround, as well as providing products where and when they need them on the site. We need to ensure we are easy to do business with as much as possible.”

Sherwood Lumber is ramping up its game in that regard, Berwick says. “Adding value in the commodity lines is the key to making a sale. Often, that’s through helping builders be more efficient and use their staff better. The more we do to help customers in new ways so they don’t have to add bodies, the more valuable we are to them. We’re looking to expand our services now, providing custom cutting and precision trimming, to meet our customers’ needs, and we will continue to add more services to better serve our customers.”

Other factors also play a role, Boise Cascade’s Mills notes. “The services that builders are most looking for are availability of high-quality products and management of their inventory flow so products arrive when they should. The days are long gone where the dealer can drop off one big load at once. The deliveries are becoming more technical in their methods. The builder expects to get the right products in the right place at the right time.”

That also means providing a consistent, high-quality product, he notes. “Dealers don’t want their stock to be picked over and the quality to drop, so they end up with a big batch of ugly looking pieces. They want customers to be able to select nice-looking pieces quickly and not have a lot of variability between them.”

Georgia-Pacific’s Key agrees. “We strive to ensure our customer base receives equal quality throughout our network of distributors. We balance grade quality and have improved the quality overall. Everyone expects a good-quality stick these days, and that’s been one positive result from the long recession.”

Service also requires having a range of products to meet all of the builders’ needs, Key adds. “Variety is definitely a key focus for building-material dealers. We see mixed truckloads of products, including sheathing, subflooring, radiant- barrier sheathing and other products together.”

As builders continue to look for more cost-effective solutions to meet code changes, labor shortages and other issues, manufacturers will stay in close touch with dealers and their customers to ensure they remain on track. “Our goal is to adapt as needs change,” Georgia- Pacific’s Key says. “We want to keep our eye on improving our products to help builders meet the changing landscape and new needs as they arise.”

Craig A. Shutt, senior contributing editor of LBM Journal, has more than 35 years of experience covering the LBM industry.

Media Contact: Distribution – Amy Warren (253) 924-3130 amy.warren@weyerhaeuser.com
Weyerhaeuser Distribution Ramps Up Sales Team at Richmond Location
Federal Way, Wash., Mar 6, 2015 – Weyerhaeuser Distribution’s Richmond, Va., distribution center has expanded its sales team in recent months, with several new positions and hires that will allow the full staff to increase attention on and service to dealer partners.

Additions and investments include:


• Area General Manager: Jan Marrs was hired as Area General Manager, and will focus on the needs of valued customers in the region. Jan has been with Weyerhaeuser for 25 years in various roles, including region general manager for recycling and manufacturing manager for engineered wood products.
• Inside Sales: The Richmond location added an inside sales team, consisting of Andrew Little, Danelle Wilder and Martina Martinez. Each new team member brings ample knowledge of and experience with the local building material environment.
• Outside Sales: A third outside salesperson—Tim Reed—has joined the distribution center, a move that will allow each salesperson more time in the field to assist customers with growing their businesses. Tim has 10 years of distribution experience with Weyerhaeuser. Tim joins Jason Mitchell and David Walls; together, they bring 51 years of industry experience.
• Product Specialist: Paul Bryant has also joined the Richmond Team as a Product Sales Representative. Paul specializes in lumber procurement and sales.
• Product Expert Designations: Within Richmond operations, Weyerhaeuser has identified product champions to ensure the team has the strongest product knowledge in the industry. Associates will leverage this increased product intimacy to support customers and help them meet growth initiatives across categories.
• Capital Investments: Weyerhaeuser Distribution has invested more than $150,000 in safety and efficiency improvements at the Richmond location, including paving and a new office.

Along with traditional product support, the Weyerhaeuser Distribution sales team provides a range of value-added services and training opportunities for its dealer partners, including support for LEAN projects and safety training.


“When our customers succeed, we succeed,” says Nate Jorgensen, vice president of Weyerhaeuser Distribution. “By ramping up our personnel and service capabilities in Richmond, we can better serve dealers in the Mid-Atlantic region, continuing our track record not just for efficient, accurate deliveries, but also for those training and support programs that set Weyerhaeuser Distribution apart.”
About Weyerhaeuser

Weyerhaeuser Company, one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands, began operations in 1900. We own or control nearly 7 million acres of timberlands, primarily in the U.S., and manage additional timberlands under long-term licenses in Canada. We manage these timberlands on a sustainable basis in compliance with internationally recognized forestry standards. We are also one of the largest manufacturers of wood and cellulose fibers products. Our company is a real estate investment trust. In 2014, our continuing operations generated $7.4 billion in sales and employed approximately 12,800 people who serve customers worldwide. We are listed on the Dow Jones World Sustainability Index. Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol WY. Learn more at www.weyerhaeuser.com.


Media Contact: ELP – Carolyn Atkinson (253) 924-3696 carolyn.atkinson@weyerhaeuser.com


Product Spotlight: TimberStrand® LSL – What Can It Do For You
Federal Way, Wash., Mar 16, 2015 – TimberStrand® LSL, one of our Trus Joist engineered wood product offerings, is manufactured in Kenora, Ontario.  It is made primarily from the underutilized and self regenerating aspen tree.   Once harvested, the logs are debarked and cut into strands to a specific width, length and thickness that is unique to this technology.  The strands are then dried and adhesive is applied prior to stacking them into a large mat.  The orientation that the strands are placed into the mat is a large driver of the final design properties the product will obtain.   The mat is then pressed in a steam injection process to make a large billet that is then cooled before being cut and sanded into the final product dimensions.  The ability to change the design properties based on strand orientation makes this the most versatile product we manufacture.
Beams and Headers:  TimberStrand® LSL is available as a beam/header material in 2 grades, 1.3E and 1.55E.   The 1.3E grade is available in 3.5” widths, while the 1.55E grade is available in both 1.75” and 3.5” widths.   The 3.5” width is an excellent choice to reduce labor time and costs (no need to nail or bolt plies together) as well as being more structurally stable due to the solid section.   The 1.55E grade beams/headers also has an allowable hole zone that is more flexible than any other engineered wood product.  This means larger holes located just about anywhere along the beam, even for beams supporting large point loads.   Our beam products specifier guide, TJ-9000, is a great resource for available sizes, grades, design properties and span charts.
Wall Framing:  Whether you are looking for a perfectly straight wall to hang your kitchen cabinets on or needing long length material that is strong and straight to support windows in a 2 story great room, TimberStrand® LSL wall framing is the right choice.   Available in 2×4, 2×6 & 2×8 stud sizes, and in lengths up to 48’, it can cover most any application.   Furthermore, the product can be sized using our single member sizing software, Forte®, for both vertical and lateral (wind load) situations.

In addition to studs and columns, TimberStrand® LSL is an excellent choice for wall plate material.  It can handle much higher loads than dimension lumber without crushing (due to a higher compression perpendicular to grain value).  And unlike dimension lumber, the concerns of plate shrinkage are nearly nonexistent.   Sill plate material is also available as our Strandguard® product, which is treated during the manufacturing process with zinc borate.  Strandguard® can be used in direct contact with concrete foundation walls and does not require special fastener protection that traditional pressure treated lumber sill plates require.


Roof Framing :   The same material used for beams, headers and wall framing can solve some of your most complex roof design problems.  Since it is manufactured straight and in very long lengths, it is ideal to use as roof rafters in steep slope cathedral ceilings as well as conventional roof framing.

Stair Stringers:  1-1/4” 1.3E TimberStrand® LSL which is typically used as rim board is also an ideal product for your stair stringer material.  It spans further and comes in longer lengths than traditional stringer material.  And due to its unique strand alignment, it resists bowing, shrinking and splitting that plagues traditional lumber stringers.   We also have tables for and 1-3/4” 1.55E TimberStrand® LSL stringers for longer span and higher load applications.


Industrial Components:   In addition to structural uses in residential and light commercial construction, you would be amazed what is made from TimberStrand® LSL components.  Its unique composition, high strength and screw holding capabilities makes it an ideal component for everything from window and door components, to furniture and crating material, to concrete form board and is even used as the substrate on bowling alley lanes.

It is pretty easy to see why this is the most versatile engineered wood product on the market and how it can solve many of your design and construction issues.  Feel free to contact our technical support staff at 1-888-453-8358 or email us for more information on TimberStrand® LSL or any of our Trus Joist products.


About Jerad Bankston, P.E.

Jerad Bankston, P.E. is a Weyerhaeuser engineer supporting Trus Joist Engineered Wood Products who is based out of St. Paul, Minnesota. During his 13+ years with Weyerhaeuser, Jerad has provided technical support and training for residential, multifamily and industrial applications.

Media Contact: OSB – Jeremy Mauck (253) 924-2907 jeremy.mauck@weyerhaeuser.com

How to Manage Moisture for Stable, Beautiful Hardwood Floors

Federal Way, Wash., Mar 17, 2015 – Edge Gold panels have long been a trusted subflooring material, helping provide a flat, solid base for a smooth, stable hardwood floor above. But like all wood products, proper moisture management is essential for quality installation.

If moisture content is too high or the moisture differential between Edge Gold and the hardwood is too great at the time of installation, problems can arise: Wet OSB will shrink as it dries, loosening around cleats and staples that attach the hardwood flooring and resulting in squeaks and pops. Additionally, wet OSB under drier hardwood flooring can cause moisture to migrate into the hardwood and result in cupped flooring. If the hardwood flooring is installed with excess moisture, it can warp or shrink and create gaps.

To help ensure a solid subfloor and stable hardwood, consider these easy-to-follow tips:

• Before installing the hardwood floors, get to know the Edge Gold panels underneath. Are panels properly installed, including the 1/8″ gap on all edges? When was it installed? When was the building closed up? Is the HVAC running? When was the floor last exposed to rain or standing water? These factors can help you determine whether the subfloor is too wet.

• Acclimate hardwood flooring to the interior environment according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Per recommendations from the National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA), don’t deliver hardwood flooring until the building is enclosed and temperature and humidity conditions match those that will be present once the building is occupied. Allow the hardwood to acclimate to the interior environment for at least five days prior to installation.

• Use a moisture meter to ensure the hardwood flooring has reached its equilibrium moisture content (the level at which it is no longer gaining or losing moisture) in accordance with manufacturer guidelines. It may be helpful to know the equilibrium moisture content of the local environment.

• Also use a moisture meter to check the Edge Gold panels’ moisture content. The NWFA considers a subfloor to be dry enough for hardwood installation in most regions when its moisture is 12 percent or less. The association recommends testing the subfloor in at least 20 locations per 1,000 square feet and averaging the results.

• Test the moisture on both the top and bottom of the Edge Gold panels and the bottoms of joists, especially over crawl spaces. An abnormally high reading in one spot can indicate a trouble zone that needs attention beyond simply allowing the entire floor time to dry out.

• Most types of hardwood flooring call for a vapor retarder between the hardwood flooring and subfloor to protect against moisture migrating up through the subfloor after the building is occupied. Note that this is not a substitute for ensuring a proper moisture balance between the hardwood and subfloor during installation.

• Once the hardwood flooring is acclimated and the Edge Gold substrate is adequately dry, the NWFA notes that the moisture difference between the two should not exceed 4 percent for solid strip flooring less than 3 inches wide and 2 percent for solid flooring 3 inches or wider. For engineered hardwood flooring, check the manufacturer’s requirements since they may vary based on hardwood species, other material components, and strip width and thickness.

Achieving a quality hardwood floor over an Edge Gold substrate is not difficult, and is largely the same as working on top of plywood. To avoid the costs and hassles of callbacks, take the time up front to allow for proper hardwood acclimation and a dry subfloor. With careful attention to moisture management at time of installation, the building occupants will enjoy a quality floor for years to come.
About Tracie Higley

Tracie Higley is a Product Manager for the OSB Business. She joined the OSB business in 2011 and has 23 years of experience within Weyerhaeuser in a variety of roles, such as Project Manager for the OSB Business & Transportation, Assistant Tax Director, Transportation Process Owner and Business Logistics Manager for Cellulose Fibers.


Media Contact: Distribution – Amy Warren (253) 924-3130 amy.warren@weyerhaeuser.com


Weyerhaeuser Distribution Centers Continue to Expand Product Brands and Selection
Federal Way, Wash., Apr 26, 2015 – Over the past few months, Weyerhaeuser Distribution has grown product offerings at locations around the country, including adding manufacturers to new regions and dramatically expanding product options and availability. The robust growth in product brands and types provides ample selection for dealers to meet the needs of their builder and remodeler customers and, ultimately, contributes to beautiful, high-performance homes.

Among the recent changes and additions across Weyerhaeuser locations:


• Moulding and boards, Georgia: Weyerhaeuser Atlanta Distribution has added HardieTrim™ moulding products to its product offering. This moulding line is the perfect complement to James Hardie® siding and trim products, creating a timeless, durable, low-maintenance exterior. In addition to the expanded moulding line, the Georgia operation is now offering Interfor 1×6 edge and center bead tongue-and-groove pattern stock, along with 2×6 V-joint roof decking. Raw and primed MDF boards and West Fraser HY-Line Spruce Lumber round out the extensive product offering.
• Trim and columns, Florida: Weyerhaeuser Jacksonville Distribution now offers Ply Gem trim and mouldings; the cellular PVC products, which offer the look of wood without the associated maintenance, are now available from Weyerhaeuser locations throughout the entire East Coast. Also available through Jacksonville distribution to add accent and charm to your next building project are HardieTrim™ moulding products and Cox pressure treated laminated columns.
• Deck railings, North Carolina: Now available to the Carolinas area are iron and aluminum railings from Fortress™ Railing Products and composite and vinyl railings from Fairway® Building Products.

• Deck railings, California: Weyerhaeuser’s Fontana and Santa Clarita distribution centers recently added do-it-yourself wood railings from BW Creative Railing Systems. The Western red cedar railings come in pre-measured and pre-drilled kits for simple installation. The Stockton distribution center also expanded its product offering with the addition of Fortress Railing Products and CertainTeed Insulation.


• Siding, Utah: Bitterroot Valley Forest Products is new to the Salt Lake City product offering. These log and timber sidings come in a variety of textures and wood species. Applications include interior, exterior and industrial use.
• Siding and trim, Colorado: The Denver distribution center now stocks James Hardie’s HardieTrim® in rough and smooth textures, along with James Hardie’s Smooth fiber cement siding line.

• Siding and trim, Illinois: The Naperville distribution center has added Eco-Side™ engineered wood siding and trim from KWP. Offerings include primed siding and trim board. Eco-Side two-coat pre-finished siding and trim comes in 10 colors, from earth tones to rich and vibrant hues.


• Specialty boards, Maryland: Dealers in the Baltimore region now have access to Arauco’s FJ Primed Radiata Boards as well as Pine Boards from Plum Creek in Select, Common and Industrial grades.
• Foundation products, Idaho: The Boise market now includes the Homasote 440 SoundBarrier®, a high-density structural board for sound control in floors, walls and ceilings.
For more information, please contact your local Weyerhaeuser Distribution representative.

About Weyerhaeuser

Weyerhaeuser Company, one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands, began operations in 1900. We own or control nearly 7 million acres of timberlands, primarily in the U.S., and manage additional timberlands under long-term licenses in Canada. We manage these timberlands on a sustainable basis in compliance with internationally recognized forestry standards. We are also one of the largest manufacturers of wood and cellulose fibers products. Our company is a real estate investment trust. In 2014, our continuing operations generated $7.4 billion in sales and employed approximately 12,800 people who serve customers worldwide. We are listed on the Dow Jones World Sustainability Index. Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol WY. Learn more at www.weyerhaeuser.com.

Media Contact: Distribution – Amy Warren (253) 924-3130 amy.warren@weyerhaeuser.com
4 Common Sales Mistakes Dealers Should Avoid
Federal Way, Wash., Apr 27, 2015 – It’s no secret that the job of a dealer salesperson is a competitive one, whether the market is in recession or rebound. Cutting through the price wars and setting yourself and your company apart takes thoughtfulness, careful planning and a good amount of relationship building.
In some cases, it’s also even simpler than that. We checked in with Rick Davis, a leading construction products sales trainer and owner of Building Leaders, to uncover some of the most common—and easily avoidable—sales mistakes that can sour a builder-dealer relationship before it even begins.
1. Showing Up Without an Appointment
Arriving at a builder’s office or jobsite unannounced makes you appear entitled and shows a lack of respect for the customer’s time. It also is a waste of your own efforts. Making an appointment ensures both parties have adequate time and focus, and will result in a better quality meeting—as well as a better impression.
2. Selling the Product First
A good sales leader understands how the customer goes to market, how they make money, how they schedule and how they make decisions. Only then can the salesperson understand the right products to meet those needs. “Your customer can get products from a lot of people,” says Davis. “What they need is someone who helps them succeed. This means showing them how they can benefit from your services with better profit, resale value, elimination of mistakes. And that means listening.”
3. Leading With Price
Too many salespeople show up on a job asking what can be bid on before they know anything about the builder’s business. This speeds up the process but drives the builder to only talk about price. And in doing so, reduces the salesperson to simply a number on paper.

Instead, a good salesperson should first understand how to provide products and services that meet the needs or solve the challenges of the builder and holding off on price until they know their chances for success are very high. This leads to stronger relationships instead of constant bidding wars.


4. Believing That Wood Is a Commodity
We recognize that wood is a commodity—but it shouldn’t be sold as such or it makes you, the dealer, a commodity too. “The dealer might buy a commodity, but what they’re selling is a service,” advises Davis. “The product comes to life when the right product is used for the right situation, when the takeoff is accurate, when the delivery is on time and when the contractor can count on zero hassles.”

For more LBM sales advice, check out Rick Davis’ columns in ProSales magazine here or visit http://www.buildingleaders.com.


About Weyerhaeuser

Weyerhaeuser Company, one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands, began operations in 1900. We own or control nearly 7 million acres of timberlands, primarily in the U.S., and manage additional timberlands under long-term licenses in Canada. We manage these timberlands on a sustainable basis in compliance with internationally recognized forestry standards. We are also one of the largest manufacturers of wood and cellulose fibers products. Our company is a real estate investment trust. In 2014, our continuing operations generated $7.4 billion in sales and employed approximately 12,800 people who serve customers worldwide. We are listed on the Dow Jones World Sustainability Index. Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol WY. Learn more at www.weyerhaeuser.com.


Media Contact: ELP – Carolyn Atkinson (253) 924-3696 carolyn.atkinson@weyerhaeuser.com


TJ-Pro® Rating – A Conversion For Every Homeowner
Federal Way, Wash., May 4, 2015 – When you bought your last vehicle did you want a soft, smooth ride or did you prefer something that was stiffer and more responsive?

What about a couch or recliner—do you want firm cushions or do you prefer to be enveloped when you sit down?


Are you a firm mattress person or soft mattress person?  A firm mattress with a pillow top?  A mattress where you can dial in your preferred level of support because your spouse doesn’t want the same thing as you?!?!



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