Canadian History in the Twentieth Century


Assessment/Evaluation Techniques



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Assessment/Evaluation Techniques


  • Formative teacher assessment of student’s knowledge and debating skills by means of a checklist or anecdotal notes. Aside from observing the contributions of those students who participated in the debate, the teacher can assess the understanding of non-contributing students by asking them probe questions in the debriefing session.

  • Formative assessment by the teacher of student notes on the topic of the contributions of various groups to Canada’s war effort

  • Formative assessment by the teacher of student lists describing increased government actions during wartime. By checklist or anecdotal notes the students’ lists are assessed for accuracy and completeness.

  • Formative assessment by the teacher of propaganda poster created by student. The poster is assessed on the student author’s understanding of government propaganda.

  • Summative evaluation by teacher of the role. Use a rubric. See Appendix 1.4.2.

Accommodations


  • Some students may require teacher or peer help in preparing arguments for the mock conscription debate.

  • Some students require teacher or peer guidance in researching material for the role playing.

  • Some students may require teacher and/or peer assistance in completing their propaganda posters and class notes.

Resources


Approved textbooks, library books, and use of the school Library/Resource Centre

Canadian Encyclopedias



Canadians at War 1914-1918 Canadiana Scrapbook.

Battle of Vimy Ridge. Four volume set. National Film Board.

The Kid Who Couldn’t Miss. National Film Board film on Billy Bishop.

World War I: Canada’s Role. Burnaby, British Columbia: Classroom Video.

Appendix 1.4.1

Assignment Sheet for Student Role-Playing





The Canadian person who is role played:

Name(s) of the student or pair of students who do the role playing:

A female factory worker during World War I




A Ukrainian farmer in Canada during World War I




A homemaker in Canada during World War I




A female army nurse during World War I




A Canadian soldier at the Battle of Ypres




A Canadian soldier at the Battle of Vimy Ridge




Wilfrid Laurier




Robert Borden




Sam Hughes




Billy Bishop




Arthur Currie




John McCrae




Tom Longboat




Nellie McClung




Emily Stowe




Emily Murphy




Agnes Macphail




William Lyon Mackenzie King




Sam McLaughlin




Frederick Banting




Charles Saunders






Appendix 1.4.2

A Rubric for Evaluating Role Playing





Criteria

Level 1
(50-59%)


Level 2
(60-69%)


Level 3

(70-79%)

Level 4
(80-100%)


Ability to research the most important and relevant information about your event or person

- a limited amount of important information provided

- some important information provided

- considerable important information provided

- all or almost all of the important information provided

Ability to demonstrate understanding of the facts and terms related to your topic

- a limited knowledge of facts and terms demonstrated

- some knowledge of facts and terms demonstrated

- considerable knowledge of facts and terms demonstrated

- a thorough knowledge of facts and terms demonstrated

Ability to take on the role of a character and to speak in the words of that character

- limited ability to take on the role of a character demonstrated

- some ability to take on the role of a character demonstrated

- considerable ability to take on the role of a character demonstrated

- a high degree of ability to take on the role of a character demonstrated

Ability to project your voice and to speak clearly during the role playing

- limited ability to project the voice and to speak clearly demonstrated

- some ability to project the voice and some ability to speak clearly demonstrated

- considerable ability to project the voice and considerable ability to speak clearly demonstrated

- high degree of ability to project the voice and a high degree of ability to speak clearly demonstrated

Ability to make eye contact with the audience while speaking

- limited ability to make eye contact with the audience demonstrated

- some ability to make eye contact with the audience demonstrated

- considerable ability to make eye contact with the audience demonstrated

- a high degree of ability to make eye contact with the audience demonstrated

Ability to answer teacher’s and/or peers’ questions related to your presentation

- limited ability to answer questions related to the presentation demonstrated

- some ability to answer questions related to the presentation demonstrated

- considerable ability to answer questions related to the presentation demonstrated

- a high degree of ability to answer questions related to the presentation demonstrated

Overall Level: Student Name:

Strengths:

Areas to Review:

Next Steps:

Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this assignment or activity.


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