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this version: 9-29-07
subject “travel accounts” 1700H OR 1800H AHL/HA * 9-24-07
Fisher, Michael H. “FROM INDIA TO ENGLAND AND BACK: EARLY INDIAN TRAVEL NARRATIVES FOR INDIAN READERS.” Huntington Library Quarterly 2007 70(1): 153-172. * Period: 1766-1902.
Bleichmar, Daniela. “EXPLORATION IN PRINT: BOOKS AND BOTANICAL TRAVEL FROM SPAIN TO THE AMERICAS IN THE LATE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.” Huntington Library Quarterly 2007 70(1): 129-151. * Period: 1777-1816.
Safier, Neil. “"EVERY DAY THAT I TRAVEL . . . IS A PAGE THAT I TURN": READING AND OBSERVING IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY AMAZONIA.” Huntington Library Quarterly 2007 70(1): 103-128. * Period: 1770's-80's.
Rebok, Sandra. “A NEW APPROACH: ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT'S PERCEPTION OF COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICA AS REFLECTED IN HIS TRAVEL DIARIES.” Itinerario [Netherlands] 2007 31(1): 61-88. * Period: 1799-1804.
Wrobel, David M. “EXCEPTIONALISM AND GLOBALISM: TRAVEL WRITERS AND THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN WEST.” Historian 2006 68(3): 431-460.
Abstract: Assesses the significance of 19th-century travel writers who described the American West in critical rather than exceptionalist terms. Although long viewed by historians and the public as the most American region of the nation, the West was home to native peoples and Hispanic settlers who were subjugated by policies that strongly resembled European imperialist actions in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. George Catlin is cited as an American who exhibited his paintings of Indians, as well as Indians who came to England, noting more similarities than differences with colonized peoples. German-born Friedrich Gerstacker, though long forgotten, was a popular travel writer whose Narrative of a Journey Around the World (1853) went through many editions. He took a critical view of Western life and observed how Americans treated the many different nationalities in California during the gold rush. Catlin and Gerstacker provide evidence that the rhetoric of exceptionalism should not be given unqualified acceptance. * Period: 19c.
Costeloe, Michael P. “WILLIAM BULLOCK AND THE MEXICAN CONNECTION.” Mexican Studies 2006 22(2): 275-309.
Abstract: William Bullock (1773-1849) was one of the first British travelers to visit Mexico after independence in 1821. Accompanied by his son, he spent six months there in 1823, and, on his return to Britain, he published an account of his experiences. He also staged in 1824 the first exhibition in Britain of Mexican artifacts and natural fauna. A year later, he liquidated all his business interests and took his family back to Mexico, where he hoped to make a fortune in silver mining. This article examines Bullock's Mexican ventures in London and in Mexico. It also provides much new biographical data on Bullock himself and on his family connections with Mexico that continued throughout the 19th century. * Period: 19c.
Woods, Fred E. “"SURELY THIS CITY IS BOUND TO SHINE": DESCRIPTIONS OF SALT LAKE CITY BY WESTERN-BOUND EMIGRANTS, 1849-1868.” Utah Historical Quarterly 2006 74(4): 334-348. * Period: 1849-68.
Brown, Matthew. “RICHARD VOWELL'S NOT-SO-IMPERIAL EYES: TRAVEL WRITING AND ADVENTURE IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY HISPANIC AMERICA.” Journal of Latin American Studies [Great Britain] 2006 38(1): 95-122.
Abstract: Richard Vowell was a British mercenary who served in the wars of independence in Hispanic America. A study of his writings offers a new perspective from which to reconsider the influential arguments of Mary Louise Pratt's Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation (1992). The article emphasizes the ways in which Vowell depicted Hispanic American masculinities, indigenous peoples, collective identities, and the diverse groups that made up society during the wars of independence. Vowell's writings suggest that further sources might be read against the traditional canon of commercial travel literature generally used by historians for the period 1800-50. * Period: 1800-50.
Nally, David. “"ETERNITY'S COMMISSIONER": THOMAS CARLYLE, THE GREAT IRISH FAMINE AND THE GEOPOLITICS OF TRAVEL.” Journal of Historical Geography [Great Britain] 2006 32(2): 313-335.
Abstract: In 1846 and again in 1849 Scottish-born historian and social critic Thomas Carlyle traveled through Ireland accompanied by Irish nationalist Charles Gavan Duffy. Significantly, these dates profile the beginning and the deadly culmination of the Great Irish Famine. It is somewhat surprising, therefore, that Carlyle's published memoirs of his travels and his various pamphlets on Ireland have merited little scholarly attention. In addition to addressing this oversight, the article places Carlyle's travel writing within the ideological contours of the Great Famine and, to this end, outlines a specific example of the "geopolitics of travel," offering an empirical and theoretical analysis of how powerful political rationales are produced at the "contact zone" of two cultures. Carlyle's shift from being a critic of laissez-faire to being a defender of property parallels his propensity to qualify what amounts to human value through environmental and racial readings of the famine. Carlyle's work thus sheds light on issues of "governmentality" and capitalist political economy, perhaps the two most powerful forces directing the course of the Irish Famine. * Period: 1846-49.
Miller, Charles William. “THE VOYAGE OF THE PARTHIAN: LIFE AND RELIGION ABOARD A 19TH-CENTURY SHIP BOUND FOR HAWAI`I.” Hawaiian Journal of History 2006 40: 27-46. * Period: 1827-28.
Collins, Robert P. “A SWISS TRAVELER IN THE CREEK NATION: THE DIARY OF LUKAS VISCHER, MARCH 1824.” Alabama Review 2006 59(4): 243-284. * Period: 1824.
Rubies, Joan-Pau. “TRAVEL WRITING AND HUMANISTIC CULTURE: A BLUNTED IMPACT?” Journal of Early Modern History [Netherlands] 2006 10(1-2): 131-168. * Period: 16c-18c.
Tilburg, Marja van. “THE ALLURE OF TAHITI: GENDER IN LATE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH TEXTS ON THE PACIFIC.” History Australia [Australia] 2006 3(1).
Abstract: Analyzes the descriptions of first contact between French explorers and Tahitians, especially travelogues that deal with the contribution of women to these encounters. Questions how 18th-century French travelogues about the Pacific represent indigenous women through a textual analysis of Louis Antoine de Bougainville's Voyage Autour du Monde (1771) and Denis Diderot's influential Supplement (1796), examining contemporary notions of femininity and the influence of the Enlightenment and early Romanticist debate on the nature of the sexes. * Period: 1770's-90's.
Glassford, Sarah. “SEAMAN, SIGHTSEER, STORYTELLER, AND SAGE: AARON THOMAS'S 1794 HISTORY OF NEWFOUNDLAND.” Newfoundland and Labrador Studies [Canada] 2006 21(1): 149-175. * Period: 1794.
Sassi, Jonathan D. “AFRICANS IN THE QUAKER IMAGE: ANTHONY BENEZET, AFRICAN TRAVEL NARRATIVES, AND REVOLUTIONARY-ERA ANTISLAVERY.” Journal of Early Modern History [Netherlands] 2006 10(1-2): 95-130.
Abstract: Compares Anthony Benezet's influential 1771 antislavery tract, Some Historical Account of Guinea, with the sources from which he gleaned his information about Africa and the slave trade, the narratives published by European travelers to West Africa. Benezet, a Philadelphia Quaker and humanitarian reformer, cited the travel literature in order to portray Africa as an abundant land of decent people. He thereby refuted the apology that cast the slave trade as a beneficial transfer of people from a land of barbarism and death to regions of civilization and Christianity. However, Benezet employed the travel narratives selectively, suppressing contradictory evidence as well as controversial material that could have been used to construct an alternative depiction of African humanity. Nonetheless, Benezet's research shaped the subsequent debate over the slave trade and slavery, as antislavery writers incorporated his depiction into their rhetorical arsenal and proslavery defenders searched for a rebuttal. * Period: 1720's-70's.
Warburg, Gabriel. “EUROPEAN TRAVELLERS AND ADMINISTRATORS IN SUDAN BEFORE AND AFTER THE MAHDIYYA.” Middle Eastern Studies [Great Britain] 2005 41(1): 55-77.
Abstract: Analyzes a variety of sources stemming from European travelers and administrators who explored or served in the area of the Upper Nile in the second half of the 19th century. This period was characterized by Egypt's strategic interest in the Sudan for access to the waters of the Nile and a need for military manpower and agricultural labor - the latter met by a flourishing slave trade. The focus here is on British attempts to abolish slavery, which became a major cause of Mahdism in the Sudan; some travelers noted the fact that Europeans had no understanding of Islam, socioeconomic conditions in the region, or the role of slavery. Indeed, many of the sixty thousand slaves freed in the Sudan by Egypt under British pressure joined the forces of the Mahdi as the only alternative to homelessness and starvation. * Period: 1772-1902.
Sohrabi, Bahram. “EARLY SWEDISH TRAVELERS TO PERSIA.” Iranian Studies 2005 38(4): 631-660.
Abstract: Swedish travelers began to visit Persia in the early 17th century, but their numbers were small in comparison to visitors from other European countries due in part to the relative unimportance of political and commercial relations between the two countries. Some merely passed through, but a few, principally military men and physicians, sought fortunes in the service of the court or the army and stayed for longer periods. After the end of the Safavid dynasty, Persia in the late 18th and 19th centuries lost its attraction for foreign visitors, but in the 19th century Conrad Fagergren (1818-79) and Bertrand Hybennet (1846-1931) achieved fame and fortune in the medical profession, while Sven Hedin (1865-1952) traveled in Persia on three occasions and passed on a great deal of knowledge of the region to the Swedish reading public. * Period: 17c-19c.
Berglund, Barbara. “CHINATOWN'S TOURIST TERRAIN: REPRESENTATION AND RACIALIZATION IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY SAN FRANCISCO.” American Studies (Lawrence, KS) 2005 46(2): 5-36.
Abstract: Chinatown tourist literature - accounts by white visitors to San Francisco's Chinatown published in books, newspapers, and magazines during the 1850's-90's - found a national audience and was essential to public perceptions of Chinese immigrants as a race, shaping debates about immigration policy and the place of Chinese immigrants in American society at large. Part of a well-established 19th-century genre of urban tourism literature, Chinatown tourist writings exhibited both an Orientalist fascination with Chinatown culture and contempt for the Chinese. Stressing a familiar set of exotic sights such as opium dens and "Joss houses" (temples), such writings ultimately portrayed Chinese immigrants as unassimilable, rehearsing white fears of labor competition as well as anxiety about Chinese immigration's effects on public health and morality. While the dominant effect of Chinatown tourist literature was to reinforce segregation and discrimination against Chinese immigrant communities through the discursive racialization of the Chinese, the genre itself expressed, to a degree, the cultural mixing produced by white writers' forays into Chinatown. * Period: 19c.
McNairn, Jeffrey L. “MEANING AND MARKETS: HUNTING, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND BRITISH IMPERIALISM IN MARITIME TRAVEL NARRATIVES TO 1870.” Acadiensis [Canada] 2005 34(2): 3-25.
Abstract: Attitudes toward hunting and economic development in travel narratives about Canada's Maritime Provinces before 1870 can be divided into three different phases. In the first, or mercantilist, phase, beginning in the mid-18th century, hunting was seen in starkly utilitarian terms as a commercial venture - the fur trade - in which Native Americans played a valuable role. In the second, or agrarian, phase, from around 1815 through the 1850's, agriculture was seen as more important than hunting, and native hunters were seen as indigents and social outcasts. In the third, or romantic, phase, from the 1850's to 1870, hunting was seen as a sport, and native guides exemplified the antimodern values of elite sportsmen. * Period: 1750's-1870.
Francois, Pieter. “IMAGES OF FRENCH CATHOLICISM AND BELGIAN PROTESTANTISM.” French History and Civilization [Australia] 2005 1.
Abstract: Analyzes mid-19th-century British views on religion in France and Belgium. The analysis is based on the numerous travel guides and accounts of British travelers touring through the continent. Whereas the observed religious situation was relatively similar, Catholicism was in both countries overwhelmingly dominant, the interpretation was strikingly different. French Catholicism was perceived as an integral part of the French national identity. The opposition between French Catholicism and British Protestantism was part of a long chain of perceived interconnected oppositions between France and Britain. After the independence of 1830, Belgium and the Belgians occupied a unique position in British imagination. Belgium was increasingly perceived as a "little Britain" or "little England on the continent." The construction of the image of "Protestant Belgians in Catholic Belgium" is a powerful example of the projection of British/English values on Belgium. In Belgium Catholicism was perceived as hostile to the true Belgian national identity and was associated with the perceived chain of foreign rulers of Belgium. * Period: 1830's-60's.
Aarstad, Rich and Stapp, Jennie. “TRAVEL AND EXPLORATION NARRATIVES IN THE MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION.” Montana 2005 55(3): 63-65.
Abstract: Discusses three rare books in the Montana Historical Society first-edition collection: the Lewis and Clark journals edited by Nicholas Biddle, the journal of Alexander Mackenzie's voyage of 1789-93, and John Allen Hosmer's travel account from Montana to the East Coast in 1865. In addition to their value as historical documents, these texts are examples of the art of bookmaking, revealing watermarks and collation marks. * Period: 1790's-1867.
Lee, Heidi Oberholtzer. “"THE HUNGRY SOUL": SACRAMENTAL APPETITE AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF TASTE IN EARLY AMERICAN TRAVEL WRITING.” Early American Studies 2005 3(1): 65-93.
Abstract: A wide-ranging comparison from the 17th century to the 1850's of the representation of food and eating in New England captivity narratives, the writings of mid-Atlantic Quaker missionaries, and the diaries of missionary nuns in Chile reveals the ways New World pilgrims used gustatory language to express their spiritual journeys. Lacking the holy sites of the Old World, such writers focused devotional language on the corporeal experience of travel itself, particularly the consumption of unfamiliar foods. In Mary Rowlandson's A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1677) and Elizabeth Hanson's God's Mercy Surmounting Man's Cruelty, Exemplified in the Captivity and Redemption of Elizabeth Hanson (1728), the captives' ability to eat repellent food signifies their spiritual transformations and the triumph of spirit over the body, while the early-18th-century Quaker missionary writings of Elizabeth Ashbridge, Susanna Morris, and Elizabeth Hudson, as well as the later journals of members of the Society of the Sacred Heart in Chile, powerfully link the satisfaction of bodily appetites with spiritual communion. * Period: 17c-1850's.
Bauer, Nancy Marshall. “A QUAKER GENTLEMAN'S ADVENTURES ABROAD: SAMUEL MARSHALL'S TRIP TO EUROPE AND THE MIDDLE EAST.” Wisconsin Magazine of History 2005-2006 89(2): 28-43.
Abstract: Presents a series of diary and journal entries as well as letters written by Samuel Marshall (1820-1907), a Wisconsin banker, while on a business and pleasure trip to Europe and the Middle East in 1855-56. Marshall made the trip with his nephew, Samuel S. Grubb, and William Corbin, a friend of Grubb's. A selection of Grubb's sketches made during the trip are also included. * Period: 1855-56.
Fox, John. “WILLIAM KELLY, GENTLEMAN GOLD DIGGER: CALIFORNIA, 1849-50; AUSTRALIA, 1853 AND 1858.” California Territorial Quarterly 2005 (64): 36-42.
Abstract: Describes the experiences of gold seeker William Kelly as he crossed North America to California in 1849. A world traveler and writer, Kelly wrote of his adventures in Across the Rocky Mountains from New York to California (1851) and other works. The article does not include a discussion of Kelly's experiences in Australia. * Period: 1849-50.
Kolk, Heidi. “TROPES OF SUFFERING AND POSTURES OF AUTHORITY IN MARGARET FULLER'S EUROPEAN TRAVEL LETTERS.” Biography 2005 28(3): 377-413.
Abstract: Traces the prodigal child mythos in Margaret Fuller's autobiographical travel letters, arguing that the povera soletta and similar types appearing in her later correspondence were the culmination of the material realities and competitive practices inherent in 19th-century travel experience. * Period: 1840's.
Hanson, James A. “RUXTON AND HIS RIFLE.” Museum of the Fur Trade Quarterly 2005 41(2): 2-8.
Abstract: Recounts the life of English adventurer George Frederick Ruxton, especially his participation in the Mexican War and his travels in the Great Lakes area and the Southwest, which he described in such writings as Life in the Far West (1848). The article also describes the 1979 auction of a rifle belonging to Ruxton, detailing the weapon's characteristics and provenance. * Period: 1830's-40's.
Elleray, Michelle. “CROSSING THE BEACH: A VICTORIAN TALE ADRIFT IN THE PACIFIC.” Victorian Studies 2005 47(2): 164-173.
Abstract: Discusses The Narrative of the Late George Vason (1840), an autobiographical account of an early-19th-century missionary who went to Tonga but ended up crossing over into local society. Stories such as this illustrate the emergence of the beachcomber as a figure in Victorian literature. Unlike the more heroic and less troubling narratives of maritime explorers, stories about the often morally dissolute and usually culturally suspect beachcombers called into question the all-important boundaries that separated Europeans from "natives" in Victorian eyes. * Period: 1840.
Kuegler, Dietmar. “MAXIMILIAN OF WIED IN PITTSBURGH.” Western Pennsylvania History 2005 88(3): 18-23.
Abstract: Provides an account of Prince Maximilian of Wied's visit to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the 1830's. Before traveling further west, the German explorer and naturalist stayed in Pittsburgh to prepare for his travels and provided written accounts of his sojourn, including descriptions of the city and surrounding areas. * Period: 1830's.
Comer, Denise K. “"WHITE CHILD IS GOOD, BLACK CHILD HIS [OR HER] SLAVE": WOMEN, CHILDREN, AND EMPIRE IN EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY INDIA.” European Romantic Review 2005 16(1): 39-58.
Abstract: Texts by British women travelers in India during the Romantic era show that British women and children were not merely passive agents in colonial situations. In their use of wet nurses in early-19th-century India, British women reinforced colonialism by cultivating the perception that British children were superior to the children of the Indian women whom they displaced for nutrition and affection. These British women were also complicit in colonial oppression by tolerating their children's rudeness to servants and by physically punishing servants in front of their children. * Period: 1805-20's.
Clements, Paul. “TENNESSEE NOTES: AN ANALYSIS OF "THE ORIGINAL" DONELSON JOURNAL AND ASSOCIATED ACCOUNTS OF THE DONELSON PARTY VOYAGE.” Tennessee Historical Quarterly 2005 64(4): 338-349.
Abstract: The "original" journal, held in the Tennessee State Library and Archives, of Colonel John Donelson's 1779 trip by river to what is now the Nashville area is certainly a copy made by his son in the 1820's, following the publication of John Haywood's Civil and Political History of Tennessee (1823). Another text, in Donelson's fee-book from the period, may contain the true contemporary account of this voyage. Historians should consider all the available versions to best understand this important trip. * Period: 1779-1820's.
Lange, Lou Ann. “TRAVELERS AND TRAVEL'S "SIGNIFICANT OTHERS": THREE VISITORS TO THE ARKANSAS TERRITORY IN 1818-1819.” Missouri Historical Review 2005 100(1): 19-39.
Abstract: Analyzes the travel literature written by three men who ventured into the Arkansas territory from 1818 to 1819. Timothy Flint, Thomas Nuttall, and Henry Rowe Schoolcraft separately set out to chronicle their experiences on the Western frontier with the hope of becoming successful travel writers. Through an examination of their writings, the article identifies a common faith in progress and civilization underlying their observations about the environment and people they encountered. Flint, Nuttall, and Schoolcraft each described Native Americans as nomadic people who would eventually be erased from history because they refused to submit to the disciplines of law and labor essential to civilization. Their writings exemplify the predominant beliefs about the West and Native Americans held by Anglo-Americans at the time. * Period: 1818-19.
Krishnan, R. S. “EXOTIC TRAVELS, TRAVELING EXOTICS: SATIRE AND NATIONALISM IN GOLDSMITH AND HAMILTON.” Lamar Journal of the Humanities 2005 30(1): 5-16.
Abstract: Discusses how some 18th-century British fiction used social satire and the genre of travel literature to champion nationalism. The author analyzes two epistolary works that employ the figure of an Eastern traveler to critique English society: Oliver Goldsmith's Citizen of the World (1762) and Elizabeth Hamilton's Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah (1796). * Period: 1762-96.
McVey, David. “"THAT HONEST AND INTELLIGENT TRAVELLER."“ History Scotland [Great Britain] 2005 5(3): 24-28.
Abstract: Recalls John Bell (1691-1780), a Scot whose 1763 Travels from St. Petersburg in Russia to Diverse Parts of Asia related his service as a physician and diplomatic aide in British embassies and missions in Russia, China, and Turkey. * Period: 1715-80.
Gibbons, Michael and Gibbons, Myles. “CHARLEMONT ON THE GRAND TOUR.” History Ireland [Ireland] 2005 13(2): 21-27.
Abstract: Surveys aspects of the grand tour (1746-54) of James Caulfield, 4th Viscount Charlemont (1728-99, subsequently 1st Earl of Charlemont), Irish statesman, antiquarian, and patron of the arts. A tour was a commonplace experience for youthful aristocrats in the 18th century, but this one was unusual for its inclusion (1749-50) of Greece, the eastern Mediterranean islands, Egypt, and Turkey and for its focus on antiquarian research. Two essays by Charlemont, based on his diaries of the eastern part of the tour, contain perceptive if biased commentary on the people and customs of the Ottoman lands. * Period: 1749-50.
Groenewald, Gerald. “FRIENDS OLD AND NEW: THE LAMMENS SISTERS AT THE CAPE, 1736.” Quarterly Bulletin of the National Library of South Africa [South Africa] 2005 59(4): 160-174. * Period: 1736.
Nayar, Pramod K. “MARVELOUS EXCESSES: ENGLISH TRAVEL WRITING AND INDIA, 1608-1727.” Journal of British Studies 2005 44(2): 213-238.
Abstract: Discusses the rhetorical transformation in English travel writing about India during 1608-1727 from detailed descriptions of the subcontinent's natural wealth and fertility to condemnations of its excesses and moral depravity. Writers such as Edward Terry, Thomas Herbert, and John Freyer tried to fulfill the demands of English academic, scientific, and commercial audiences by providing detailed accounts of India's natural resources and exotic customs. These positive appraisals of India, however, were increasingly accompanied by allusions to the country's natural excesses - such as climate, dangerous animals, and native iconography - and negative moral judgments, the latter of which anticipated the overtly colonialist English attitudes toward India that became commonplace after the 1750's. * Period: 1608-1727.
Kappeler, Andreas; Yurkevich, Myroslav, transl. “UKRAINE IN GERMAN-LANGUAGE HISTORIOGRAPHY.” Journal of Ukrainian Studies [Canada] 2004 29(1-2): 245-264. * Period: 18c-20c.
Dym, Jordana. “"MORE CALCULATED TO MISLEAD THAN INFORM": TRAVEL WRITERS AND THE MAPPING OF CENTRAL AMERICA, 1821-1945.” Journal of Historical Geography [Great Britain] 2004 30(2): 340-363.

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