Universidad de especialidades espíritu santo



Download 110.7 Kb.
Date23.04.2018
Size110.7 Kb.

UNIVERSIDAD DE ESPECIALIDADES ESPÍRITU SANTO


FACULTAD DE ESTUDIOS INTERNACIONALES

SYLLABUS

ENGLISH VERSION

FOR DAC 11 VER 12 03 09


COURSE: Lost Civilizations and CODE: UHUM280

Mythical/Ancestral Cultures 1

FACULTY: Robert A. Parsons CREDITS: 3

# CONTACT HRS: 48 #NONCONTACT HOURS: 96

YEAR: 2009 PERIOD: FALL I

DAYS: Mon-Thursday SCHEDULE: 19:25-20:45

ROOM # : F-203 DATE: August 20, 2009

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION


This course explores some of the lost civilizations and cultures considered mythical and examines traits of them in tales for young and old throughout the ages, places where Archaeology and Science Fiction cross paths. The course examines lost civilizations and imaginary worlds, such as the Giants and Plato’s Atlantis, Lemuria and the land of MU.
2. JUSTIFICATION

Nothing stimulates creativity more than imagining life in a lost civilization. The aim of this course is to have students research ancestral and mythical cultures and trace aspects of them to their own cultures. It is also important for students to realize how many of these lost civilizations can be part of our everyday lives and how they are alive in old tales around the world. Disney Productions have been very successful at bringing Lost Civilizations to the giant screen for the enjoyment of all. Children’s Literature carries the traditions of ancestral cultures forward into the modern era.


3. OBJECTIVES


  1. GENERAL

  • To take a fresh look at Lost Civilizations, Ancestral Cultures and Imaginary Worlds through the eyes of historians, archaeologists, movie producers, esoteric, and even science fiction writers

  • To develop a taste for reading tales for young and old.

  • To gain familiarity with the writings of Plato and the late 19th and early 20th century researchers (e.g. Churchward, Whitmore and Donnelly) on the theme of lost civilizations.

  • To understand and critique the way modern writers such as Shirley Andrews and Riane Eisner have continued the scholarly tradition of lost civilization into modern times.

  1. SPECIFIC

  • To research specific topics about the past and establish connections to life in the 21st century.

  • To expand vocabulary and to develop reading and writing skills.

  • To articulate the allure for modern people of constructions of past utopias.


4. COMPETENCIES

  • To identify the concept and the history of lost civilizations.

  • To describe the characteristics of the most well known lost civilizations.

  • To theorize on reasons for the persistence of lost civilization lure into the modern era.

  • To investigate the details of the most popular and persistent lost civilizations that have emerged throughout history to form the basis of the legends.

  • To recognize literary and cinematic manifestations of the theme of lost civilizations in the modern era.

  • To summarize, analyze and evaluate the writings of Plato and such 19th and 20th century researchers as Churchward and Donnelly on the theme of lost civilizations.

  • To summarize and evaluate the writings of contemporary writers such as Shirley Andrews and Riane Eisner on lost civilizations and to articulate their ideological perspectives where appropriate.

  • To theorize from psychological, artistic and historical perspectives on how and why similar cultural manifestations appear in many different parts of the world.


5. COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE


DATES &

SESSIONS



COMPETENCIES

UNITS/CONTENTS


READINGS


EVALUATION

Session 1

Aug. 31

The student identifies the concept and the history of lost civilizations.

An introductory overview of the many lost civilizations in mythology and in history.

Mysterious and mythological Places (see Webliography)

Discusses the extent of the topic of lost civilizations and types of lost civilizations to be considered. Each student selects a particular lost civilization from history or mythology as a short research project.

Session 2

Sept. 1

An examination of some of the most prominent mythological or historical civilizations of the past. The human need to construct utopias.

Individual online or print readings as appropriate and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utopia


Gives short (5 to 10 minute) oral reports on lost or mythical civilization chosen in previous class.

Session 3

Sept. 2

The student identifies and describes the general characteristics of the most well-know lost civilizations.

Commonalities and differences. Comparison and contrast of well-known lost civilizations. Analysis of writing samples.

Individual online or print readings as appropriate.

Transforms oral report into brief (2 to 3 paragraphs) essay on chosen civilization. Analyzes classmates’ essays in group discussion.

Session 4

Sept. 3

Commonalities and differences. Comparison and contrast of well-known lost civilizations. Analysis of writing samples.

Individual online or print readings as appropriate.

Analyzes classmates’ essays in group discussion.

Session 5

Sept. 7

The mysteries of Easter Island

Easter Island Home Page, http://www.netaxs.com/~trance/rapanui.html and LeBaron, Charles,“The Giants of Easter Island,” 92-105, The World’s Last Mysteries.

Writes short essay on Easter Island mysteries. Discusses the mysteries and legends of Easter Island.

Session 6

Sept. 8

The rise and disappearance of the Olmec culture.

http://www.crystalinks.com/olmec.html and http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/olmec/mystery.htm


Takes short quiz on the importance of the Olmec civilization. Discusses the achievements and decline of the Olmecs.

Session 7

Sept. 9

The Nazca mysteries

http://www.crystalinks.com/nazca.html



Writes short essay on the mysterious Nazca lines. Speculates on the purpose of the lines and discusses other Nazca cultural achievements.

Session 8

Sept. 10

The legends of Cíbola and Quivira and El Dorado

On Quivira and Cíbola http://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/1551092 and on El Dorado

http://www.kaiku.com/eldorado.html

and “Colombian Lake Holds Secret of El Dorado” at http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/754792/posts



Writes short essay on the origins of legends of golden cities. Discusses in groups or pairs the persistence of legend of El Dorado and similar mythical places.

Session 9

Sept. 14

Lost or mythical civilizations of the far northern realm: Hyperboreas and Thule

http://www.pytheas.net/name_logo/thule2.htm and http://miguelgoitizolo.ws/AtlantisAndHyperboreas.htm


Discusses in groups or pairs the characteristics of the mythical northern civilizations and analyses the ways the legends of the north have been used to support ideological biases.

Session 10

Sept. 15

The pre-Aztec civilization ofTeotihuacán

Teotihuacán homepage: http://archaeology.asu.edu/teo/



Discusses the remarkable achievements of Teotihuacán culture, its legacy in central Mexico and its mysterious decline and disappearance.

Session 11

Sept. 16


The mysteries of the Mayas.

Steirlin, Henri, “The Magnificent Realm of the Mayas,” 266-279,

The World’s Last Mysteries.


Discusses the characteristics of Mayan culture, their remarkable cities and artistic achievements. Speculates in groups or pairs on the reason for their decline.

Session 12

Sept. 17

Legends and myths of giants.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_(mythology) and http://waylandermyth.multiply.com/journal/item/30/Some_Giants_from_Mythology

Each student selects a myth about giants (or a particular giant) and makes an oral report to the class.

Session 13

Sept. 21

Other mythical lands: Avalon, Fortunate Isles, Camelot, Enchanted Forests, Midgard, Cockaigne, Mount Parnassus, Aztlán, Arcadia, Agartha and Shambhala.

Various websites

Each student writes a short essay (approx. 2 paragraphs) on one of the lesser known mythical lands. The class as a whole examines and critiques the writing samples.




Session 14

Sept. 22



EXAM








Session 15

Sept. 23


The student summarizes and evaluates the writings of 19th and 20th century researchers such as Churchward and Donnelly, and modern writers such as Shirley Andrews on the theme of lost civilizations.


The mythological continent of

Mu.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu_(lost_continent) and selection from Churchward’s The Lost Continent of Mu and Chapter 1, “The Motherland of Mu,” from S. Andrew’s Lemuria and Atlantis.

Disscusses Churchward’s and S. Andrew’s writings on the lost continent of Mu.

Each student selects one mythical or lost civilization as the bimester research project.



Session 16

Sept. 24

The mythological continent of Lemuria

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemuria_(continent) and Chapter 2, Andrews, “Life in Lemuria”

Writes short essay on Lemurian lure. Discusses blending of Lemuria and Mu in esoteric and occult writings.

Session 17

Sept. 28

The student identifies and describes the character­istics of the most well-know lost civilizations

An overview of the legend of Atlantis

http://theshadowlands.net/atlantis/index.htm l Part 1 only, “The Legend of Atlantis” and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantis


Identifies the main points of agreement and of uncertainty in the Atlantis legends as they survive in the modern era.

Session 18

Sept. 29

The student summarizes and analyzes the writings of Plato on the lost continent of Atlantis

.


Earliest references to Atlantis,

the most persistent legendary lost continent.



Plato’s “Critias” dialogue

Analyzes details of “Critias”

Session 19

Sept. 30

Earliest references to Atlantis,

the most persistent legendary lost continent.



Plato’s “Critias” dialogue

Analyzes details of “Critias” Gives brief update on research report.


Session 20

Oct. 1

The student summarizes analyzes and evaluates the writings such 19th and 20th century researchers as Churchward and Donnelly on the theme of lost civilizations.

Some of Ignatius Donnelly’s theories in support of the existence of Atlantis.

Donnelly, Atlantis, the Antediluvian World, Part III, Chapter 2, “The Identity of the Civilizations of the Old World and the New”

Discusses evidence presented by Donnelly.

Session 21

Oct.5

The student theorizes from psychological, artistic and historical perspectives on how and why similar cultural manifestations appear in many different parts of the world.

Carl Gustav Jung’s theories of the “collective unconscious” and their relevance to Atlantis studies.

http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/jung.html

and


http://www.kheper.net/topics/Jung/collective_unconscious.html

Discusses in groups or pairs Jung’s theories as they relate to mythical and lost cultures. Final updates on research report.


Session 22

Oct. 6

The student summarizes analyzes and evaluates the writings such 19th and 20th century researchers as Churchward and Donnelly on the theme of lost civilizations.

Kyle Van Mitchell’s revision and update of Preston B. Whitmore’s classic “The Mythical World of Atlantis.”

Whitmore and Van Mitchell, “The Historical Atlantis,” 34-47 and “The Atlantean People,” 48-60.

Summarizes in writing the important points of the Whitmore/Van Mitchell “collaboration.”

Session 23

Oct. 7

The student summarizes and evaluates the writings of contemporary writers such as Shirley Andrews and Riane Eisner on lost civilizations.

Ancestral cultures? Theories on North and South American connections with mythical cultures.

Shirley Andrews, Lemuria and Atlantis, chapters 6 &7, “North America” and “South America,” 55-64.

Discusses Andrews’ theories.

Session 24

Oct. 8


The student analyzes important literary and cinematic manifestations of the theme of lost civilizations in the modern era.

Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Riane Eisler, “The Chalice and the Blade,” Chapter 5, “Memories of a Lost Age: the Legacy of the Goddess,” 59-77.

Watches the movie Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Session 25

Oct. 12

Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Eisler, 59-77.

Finishes watching the movie Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Session 26

Oct. 13



Discussion and critique of Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire and of Eisler.

Reviews of Atlantis: The Lost Empire. Critical review of Atlantis: The Lost Empire due today.



Eisler, 59-77.


Discusses Disney’s feature film and Eisler’s ideas. Writes a 2 to 4 page critical review of Atlantis: The Lost Empire


Session 27

Oct.14

The student investigates the details of the most popular and persistent lost civilizations that have emerged throughout history to form the basis of the legends.


Research reports to class, 15 minutes each with questions and answers

None.

Each student writes research paper or fictional story and presents an oral summary of his/her written project.

Session 28


Oct.15

Research reports to class, 15 minutes each with questions and answers. Final written project due today.

None.

Each student presents an oral summary of his/her written project.

Session 29

Oct. 19




EXAM





Session 30

Oct. 20



Grade distribution and individual conferences




MIDTERM EXAM: September 23

FINAL EXAM: October 21.

6. METHODOLOGY


  • Participation in class discussions.

  • Oral reports to the class.

  • Short essays and other writing exercises.

  • Investigations/Research/creative writing.

  • Use of technological resources.


7. EVALUATION

7.1 Assessment Criteria

  • Class Participation

  • Group and individual projects

  • Research projects

  • Quizzes


Participation: Because this course has participatory and group activities, attendance is essential. Students are permitted two class absences without penalty. After the second absence, the class participation portion of the final grade is reduced by 20% for each absence. Class participation is active engagement in all class activities, such as contribution to full class discussions, and small-group projects and exercises. In accordance with UEES policy, seven class absences result in a failing grade for the course.
Quizzes: Most quizzes are announced. However, based on the assigned reading and the topics covered in class, several surprise quizzes will also be given during the course. Quizzes start at the beginning of the class and take from 15 to 20 minutes. Students who arrive more than five minutes after the start of a quiz will not be allowed to take the quiz that day. The lowest quiz grade will be dropped.
Homework: Homework will sometimes be assigned. The homework assignments should be handed in the next meeting. Students might be expected to conduct preliminary research, or summarize and analyze an website article, complete a written exercise or other short project. Some assignments require in-class presentation. All assignments must be word processed and printed out. NOTE: Students who do not hand in homework on time will be allowed to turn it in on another day but it will be graded over 70.
7.2 Performance Markers

  • Researches different lost and mythical civilizations

  • Evaluates contributions of different historical lost civilizations

  • Critiques ideological uses of mythical civilizations

  • Selects a lost or mythical civilization as a research topic

  • Writes a 4 to 6 page research paper on the chosen civilization and summarizes the research orally to the class. Or Writes a 4 to 8 page fictional story set in a lost or mythical place and presents the story to the class in the form of a summary or a dramatic reading.

  • Writes a 2 to 4 page critical review of Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire


7.3 Weighting

  • Individual REPORTS 15%

  • CLASS PARTICIPATION 15%

  • QUIZZES 15%

  • short essays 10%

  • Research paper and report 15%

  • MIDTERM 15%

  • FINAL EXAM 15%



8.BIBLIOGRAPHY
    1. REQUIRED


Selected readings from:

  • Andrews, Shirley. Atlantis: Insights from a Lost Civilization. Woodbury, Minnesota: Llewellyn Publications, 1997.
  • Andrews, Shirley. Lemuria and Atlantis: Studying the Past to Survive the Future. Woodbury, Minnesota: Llewellyn Publications, 2004.


  • Churchward, James. The lost continent of Mu. New York: I. Washburn, 1931.

  • Donnelly, Ignatius. Atlantis: The Antedeluvian World. 1882. (see WEBliography)

  • Eisler, Riane. The Chalice and the Blade: Our History, Our Future. New York: HarperCollins, 1988.

  • Plato’s Dialogue “Critias” (see WEBliography)

  • The World’s Last Mysteries. Multiple authors. Translation of Les derniers mystères du monde. Pleasantville, NY: Readers Digest Association, Inc., 1976.

    1. COMPLEMENTARY

  • Readings from C.G. Jung or readings about his theories on archetypes and the collective unconscious, online or as available in the library

    1. WEBLIOGRAPHY

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mythological_places

  • An interesting site of mysterious places that defy explanation

http://www.kaiku.com/mysterious.html

  • Donnelly, Ignatius. Atlantis: The Antedeluvian World. 1882. Entire text of 480 pages is available online at http://www.sacred-texts.com/atl/ataw/index.htm

  • The Active Mind: Atlantis – Facts, Fiction or Exaggeration? At http://www.activemind.com/Mysterious/Topics/Atlantis/#Introduction

  • Plato’s dialogue “Critias” translated from the Greek by Benjamin Jowett, at http://philosophy.eserver.org/plato/critias.txt (also accessible in its entirety in an earlier translation in Chapter II of Donnelly)

  • Sites on C.G. Jung’s concept of the collective unconscious:

  • http://www.carl-jung.net/collective_unconscious.html

  • http://www.kheper.net/topics/Jung/collective_unconscious.html

  • http://www.new-age-spirituality.com/philos/jung.html

  • http://www.archetypewriting.com/articles/articles_ck/archetypes1.htm


10.0

FACULTY INFORMATION

NAME: Robert A. Parsons

Professor, World Languages and Cultures

University of Scranton

Scranton, PA 18510 U.S.
BA, German (1970) West Virginia University

MA, German (1972) West Virginia University

MA, Spanish (1976) Ohio University

PhD, Spanish (1982) Pennsylvania State University
Emails: parsonsr1@scranton.edu

rap.parsons@gmail.com



10. 0

Prepared by: Robert A. Parsons Date: August, 2009

Reviewed by: Dean Mónica Reynoso Date: August, 2009

Download 110.7 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page